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Profile: QP
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User Name: QP
Forum Rank: Advanced Member
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Joined: Thursday, May 28, 2015
Last Visit: Monday, October 09, 2017 11:10:24 PM
Number of Posts: 371
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  Last 10 Posts
Topic: What do these words mean?
Posted: Wednesday, October 04, 2017 10:37:47 PM
For more information, my teacher said it is from a classic English literature written in the 18th century. It is old novel.
Topic: What do these words mean?
Posted: Wednesday, October 04, 2017 11:09:03 AM
Hi friends,

I read a novel and got some questions on the following words:-

A: “Why do you love him, B?”
B: “Well, because he is handsome, and pleasant to be with.”
A: “Bad!” was my commentary.
B: “Because he is young and cheerful.”
A: “Bad still.”
B: “And because he loves me.”
A: “Indifferent, coming there.
B: “And he will be rich, and I shall like to be the greatest woman of the neighbourhood, and I shall be proud of having such a husband.”
A: “Worst of all. And now, say how you love him?”
B: “As anybody loves—You’re silly, A.”
A: “Not at all—Answer.”
B: “I love the ground under his feet, and the air over his head, and everything he touches, and every word he says. I love all his looks, and all his actions, and him entirely and altogether. There now!”

Could anyone let me know the meaning of 'coming there' and 'there now' in the above sentence?

Thank you.

Topic: What does this sentence mean?
Posted: Tuesday, October 03, 2017 10:43:23 AM
Thank you very much for your help.
Topic: What does this sentence mean?
Posted: Tuesday, October 03, 2017 3:20:00 AM
Hi friend,

I read an old novel and found these sentences:-

“He’s doing his very utmost; but his constitution defies him.
Mr. Kenneth says he would wager his mare, that he’ll outlive any man on this side Gimmerton,
and go to the grave a hoary sinner; unless some happy chance out of the common course befall him.”

I don't understand the bold sentence. Does it mean "and go to the grave of a hoary sinner" or "die as a hoary sinner"? or other it has other meanings.

Can any one help to explain, please.

Thank you

QP
Topic: Put dents on wall?
Posted: Thursday, August 24, 2017 9:14:03 PM
Thank you all viewers. I have got the answers.
Topic: Put dents on wall?
Posted: Thursday, August 24, 2017 8:52:37 AM
Hi friends,

I would like to ask for your help on explaining this sentence:-

Prisoners play baglama, put dents on the walls.

I understand that it means make holes on the walls. If my understanding is correct, the question is

Is it correct to use put dents on the walls or should it be put dents in the walls.

ps. bag lama is Turkish instrument.

Best regards,
QP
Topic: Get one on his own back?
Posted: Tuesday, August 08, 2017 3:56:19 AM
Thank you very much. I am clear now.
Topic: To loosen the top button?
Posted: Tuesday, August 08, 2017 2:59:01 AM
Thank you all. I get it now.
Topic: What does this sentence mean?
Posted: Tuesday, August 08, 2017 2:11:17 AM
Thank for all.
Topic: what does "raging" mean in this sentence?
Posted: Tuesday, August 08, 2017 2:06:23 AM
Thank you Mr. Thar. I get it now.

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