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Profile: Ivan Fadeev
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User Name: Ivan Fadeev
Forum Rank: Advanced Member
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Joined: Saturday, February 21, 2015
Last Visit: Wednesday, May 1, 2019 1:46:58 PM
Number of Posts: 354
[0.04% of all post / 0.23 posts per day]
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  Last 10 Posts
Topic: the longest
Posted: Wednesday, April 17, 2019 8:06:15 AM
Surprisingly so, but an american friend of mine has told me that he would say like this:

When was it that you spent the longest amount of time ever in a traffic jam?

Does it sound OK to you?
Topic: for + gerund
Posted: Monday, April 15, 2019 1:20:06 AM
Does this one work?

I need it for cooking.
Topic: for + gerund
Posted: Thursday, April 11, 2019 2:08:15 PM
So, is this one correct?

He is (at) the perfect age for learning to ride a motorbike.
Topic: for + gerund
Posted: Thursday, April 11, 2019 8:41:11 AM
Some sentences with this construction work others don't. Could you tell which ones are correct?

This word is difficult for remembering
It's a perfect place for fishing.
It's time for doing this work.
He is at the age for riding a motorbike.
O know some techniques for remembering a lot of words.
This is a program for drawing
This is site for watching the city.


Topic: during the/a year/day
Posted: Wednesday, April 10, 2019 3:38:56 PM
Not a single example with "during a day"? Amazing!
Topic: during the/a year/day
Posted: Wednesday, April 10, 2019 3:17:02 PM
Are there any examples with "during a day" which are idiomatic?

What about this?

The sun rises once and sets once during a day.
Topic: past perfect/past simple
Posted: Monday, April 1, 2019 6:30:14 AM
I see that punctual verbs work differently with WHEN than DURATIVE.

1 When football practice ended, the kids came home.

Ended and came are punctual verbs.

But I want to explore the usage of WHEN with DURATIVE verbs.


That's what I want to know:

Can "while she was cooking" equal to "when she cooked"?
Topic: past perfect/past simple
Posted: Monday, April 1, 2019 6:19:32 AM
thar wrote:
That doesn't work because 'cooked lunch' is is not a single time, it is a duration.

OK. In other words you are saying that "When Helen cooked lunch" means "When Helen was cooking lunch". Right?

Why can't it work then?

When Helen was cooking lunch the kids came home.

Can When Helen cooked lunch the kids came home. mean:

Every time (whenever) Helen was cooking lunch the kids came home.



Topic: For (the last) two day
Posted: Monday, April 1, 2019 5:48:16 AM
I also wonder if it's a Monday today, what are the two last days?

I haven't seen her in the last two days.

Does it mean Saturday and Sunday or Sunday and Monday?
Topic: past perfect/past simple
Posted: Monday, April 1, 2019 5:41:05 AM
I see, thank you.

When Helen cooked lunch the kids came home.


Does it mean that the two actions take place at the same time in this sentence?

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