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Profile: Ivan Fadeev
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User Name: Ivan Fadeev
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Joined: Saturday, February 21, 2015
Last Visit: Friday, September 21, 2018 4:36:15 PM
Number of Posts: 86
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  Last 10 Posts
Topic: A few contexts with Continuous and Simple
Posted: Thursday, September 20, 2018 2:48:00 PM
Thanks a lot, DragONSpeaker, RuthP and Thar! Большое спасибо!
Topic: A few contexts with Continuous and Simple
Posted: Thursday, September 20, 2018 10:48:38 AM
It is an interesting concept of action versus event. But I can't firmly grasp it because every event can't be itself without an action, as well as, every action can be considered an event. It's hard for me to separate them.
Topic: A few contexts with Continuous and Simple
Posted: Thursday, September 20, 2018 10:40:44 AM
By the way, I know that PS is about a habitual actions. But sometimes it can be used within a very short period of time. I heard this in a cartoon.

One guy was trying to fix a robot and he wasn't getting on well with it. He shouted to his friend.
"Nothing I try is working"

He was trying virtually for 30 seconds in the cartoon. I don't think that 3- seconds is enough for an action to become habitual. I am talking about his TRYING. It puzzles to some extent.
Topic: A few contexts with Continuous and Simple
Posted: Thursday, September 20, 2018 10:28:42 AM
I see. One thing to elaborate.
Why can't we apply "a fixed, inevitable plan" to examples 1 and 3?

1)I don't work tomorrow because tomorrow is my day-off. (a fixed plan)

3) I don't work today. I am on holiday. (an inevitable situation)

Just trying to understand.

Thank you for the prompt response.


Topic: A few contexts with Continuous and Simple
Posted: Thursday, September 20, 2018 10:13:16 AM
1) Which one is better Continuous or Simple?

I don't work tomorrow because tomorrow is my day-off.
I am not working tomorrow because tomorrow is my day-off.

2) When do you meet Tom tomorrow?
When are you meeting Tom tomorrow?

3) I don't work today. I am on holiday.
I am not working today. I am on holiday.
Topic: A change in activity
Posted: Thursday, September 20, 2018 5:22:26 AM
That was a typo. If I didn't know that I would not have been able to communicate more or less difficult sentence, conditionals are included as well. But thank you for elaboration.
Topic: be off
Posted: Wednesday, September 19, 2018 1:59:14 AM
Thank you all. I get it. Just a note. In my view (which is a foreigner's view), it's hard to see a significant difference in similar situations for work and classes (studies). If my work ends at 16.00 and someone else's classes end at 16.00, it means that we are free at 16.00. And it beats me why it is OK to say "I will get off work at four" but it's not OK to say "I will get off my classes at four". The main idea is the same. But one mustn't venture into others' home with a charter of one's own.
Topic: be off
Posted: Tuesday, September 18, 2018 4:25:54 PM
I don't like those two whens.
Topic: be off
Posted: Tuesday, September 18, 2018 4:07:41 PM
I just stumbled upon this passage:

Hurry it up, will you, Val?” Val stepped into the hall. “I have to get back to work now, sheriff. Can we talk about this later?” John realized he had no choice but to agree. “I reckon. When will you be off work tonight?”

What do you recommend for me to say instead?

1 When are you done with your work/studies today?
Topic: be off
Posted: Tuesday, September 18, 2018 3:45:18 PM
Do these work for you?

1) When will you be off work tonight?
2) When will you be off your studies today?

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