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Profile: Ivan Fadeev
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User Name: Ivan Fadeev
Forum Rank: Advanced Member
Gender: None Specified
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Joined: Saturday, February 21, 2015
Last Visit: Monday, January 27, 2020 12:46:40 PM
Number of Posts: 481
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  Last 10 Posts
Topic: talk strange/brave
Posted: Saturday, January 25, 2020 11:55:59 PM
Thank you! But "brave" is a quote from a movie.

Rajesh: You know who's got to be the bravest person in the Marvel Universe? Whoever has to give She-Hulk a bikini wax.
Howard: You want to talk brave, how about Captain America's undocumented Mexican gardener?
Leonard: He's not braver than whoever uses the bathroom after The Thing.

Getting back to FounDit's interpretation. I see that he provided two different meanings.


1 He talks strange. = He says strange things.
2 He talks brave. = He talks of bravery.

Syntactically the sentences are the same, but they have different meanings. I have no clue why.
Topic: talk strange/brave
Posted: Saturday, January 25, 2020 1:19:53 AM
How would you explain them?

Let's talk politics. = Let's talk about politics.

But how about these?

1 He talks strange. - (The things he says are strange) or (He talks about strange things)
2 He talks brave. - (The things he says are brave) or (He talks about bravery)
Topic: What is there
Posted: Wednesday, January 22, 2020 10:54:07 PM
Thank you! One more thing. Am I imagining that

What is there on the table? - may mean what are the things which are usually on the table?

What is on the table? - may mean what are the thing which you can see now on the table?

And here is an example with soup


What is there in this soup? - Does it mean "What are the ingredients of the soup?"
What is in this soup? - Does it mean "What's that in this soup? Is it a fly?"
Topic: What is there
Posted: Wednesday, January 22, 2020 3:30:56 PM
I think these pairs mean different things:

1 What is there in your bag?
2 What is in your bag?

3 What is there on the table?
4 What is in the table?

I think 2 and 4 are used when I want to know what is in or on something at the current moment. 1 and 3 sounds as something permanent as if "What is (always) there in your bag?"? Do you agree? Are there any more nuances?
Topic: have something
Posted: Wednesday, January 22, 2020 3:19:09 PM
Is this a possible construction?

They have a war been going on for several years.
They have a war having been going on for several years.

I know a man been working in this company for 2 years.
I know a man having been working in this company for 2 years.
Topic: immediate past
Posted: Monday, January 20, 2020 12:32:24 PM
Thank you for having added "about" but I have written enough to demonstrate my point for you to see it. Drago doesn't disapprove of the present perfect continuous and it makes me wonder why.

PS: by they way - let's start with fixing up or by fixing up?
Topic: immediate past
Posted: Monday, January 20, 2020 11:50:37 AM
Thank you very much. It's getting clearer. One more thing. Being a person interested in English I am open to different opinions of natives and I remember being exposed to the idea expressed by some natives that there is a difference between:

1 What have you been talking? (the present perfect continuous)
and
2 What were you talking? (the past continuous)

They said that 1 implied a series of talks in the recent past while 2 implied a one-off conversation in the immediate past. Does it hold water? If it's true then d and h are not OK in my contexts or maybe it's possible to stretch them to the point where they are acceptable. What do you think?
Topic: immediate past
Posted: Monday, January 20, 2020 2:06:32 AM
What tenses are good for the actions in the immediate past?

One of my colleagues is coming back to the office from the street and I want to know what he/she has just done. They might have been smoking/talking on the phone etc. What are good options?

- You are coming back from the street...

a) What were you (just) doing there?
b) What did you do there?
c) What have you done there?
d) What have you been doing outside?


A similar scenario. I enter the office and I see my colleague is sitting still thinking. What questions would be fine?

e) What were you (just) doing ?
f) What did you (just) do?
g) What have you (just) done?
h) What have you been (just) doing?
Topic: restrictive relative clause
Posted: Sunday, January 19, 2020 1:23:18 PM
Could you shed some light on it?

1 The apples that some shops sell in this town are expensive. (restrictive relative clause)

2 Apples, which some shops sell in this town, are expensive. (non-restrictive relative clause)

I hope I constructed the sentences correctly. My question is this:

What is the factor which determines what article should go with "apples"? Is it punctuation or the words "which" and "that"? Would it be correct to put them this way?


3 The apples which some shops sell in this town are expensive. (restrictive relative clause)

4 Apples, that some shops sell in this town, are expensive. (non-restrictive relative clause)
Topic: going to be the first time
Posted: Saturday, January 18, 2020 8:10:59 AM
I think that "This is the first time I have smoked" can be also used after the action "smoking" has just finished.