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Profile: NKM
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User Name: NKM
Forum Rank: Advanced Member
Occupation: Retired computer programmer; musician
Interests: Language in general, English in particular
Gender: Male
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Joined: Saturday, February 14, 2015
Last Visit: Friday, October 19, 2018 7:44:34 PM
Number of Posts: 4,913
[0.54% of all post / 3.65 posts per day]
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  Last 10 Posts
Topic: Lay
Posted: Friday, October 19, 2018 7:32:05 PM
D00M wrote:
Hello respected teachers,

Which of the following is better English?


We began to extend the railway track and lay it among more interesting landscape by planting trees, which in turn attracted more wildlife, and by making cuttings through the rock.

We began to extend the railway track and laid it among more interesting landscape by planting trees, which in turn attracted more wildlife, and by making cuttings through the rock.

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Both are grammatically correct, but I don't like either of them.

We began to extend the railway track through some more interesting landscape, cutting through rock and planting trees along the way in hopes of attracting more wildlife.

Topic: Carry
Posted: Friday, October 19, 2018 7:21:53 PM
D00M wrote:
Hello respected teachers,

What's the difference between the following two?

Carry on with your work while I am away.

Carry on your work while I am away.

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"Carry on with your work" sounds quite natural, and is equivalent to "Continue doing what you've been doing."

"Carry on your work" seems rather strange — an awkward way to say "Do your work."

Topic: become vs became
Posted: Friday, October 19, 2018 11:59:48 AM
Yes!

Topic: correct punctuation
Posted: Friday, October 19, 2018 11:57:54 AM
Good advice from Romany!

Both sentences are correct, though personally I like the first one better.

In fact the sentence would be correct, and at least fairly readable, with all three commas, or with no commas at all.

It's just a matter of style.

Topic: effort vs efforts
Posted: Friday, October 19, 2018 11:50:54 AM
As pj says, it sounds rather impersonal — like a "form letter" from a corporate hierarchy.

It would seem more sincere, perhaps, with a different adjective: "Thank you for your valiant effort(s)."

Topic: Is "embrace it" correctly used in the sentence?
Posted: Wednesday, October 17, 2018 11:56:41 AM
Certainly it is correct, assuming that "it" (Myoho-Renge-Kyo) is a something like a philosophy, method or set of beliefs.

Topic: Is "on" needed?
Posted: Wednesday, October 17, 2018 11:49:26 AM
Koh Elaine wrote:
I thought that since I had nothing to lose, I should let the Buddha help me and decide (on) my path.


Is "on" needed?


Thanks.



Is the "and" needed?

Topic: A vs The
Posted: Wednesday, October 17, 2018 11:40:43 AM
Amybal wrote:
HI, I'm just curious did I used "A" in a correct way for "A pulse-pounding.. or should be The pulse-pounding...?

A pulse-pounding thrillers where anyone can get away with murder!

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It could be either "A pulse-pounding thriller" or "The pulse-pounding thrillers".

If it's about more than one thriller it's probably best with no article at all; if it's only one thriller, either article would work.

(Depends on context, of course; with just an isolated fragment it's hard to be sure.)

Topic: Inhabit with
Posted: Friday, October 12, 2018 11:49:12 AM
Clearly that is what it means, though the use of "inhabit" without a direct object feels downright wrong to me.

Topic: is vs was
Posted: Friday, October 12, 2018 11:44:49 AM
I'm a firm believer in the use of the subjunctive, but in this situation "was" is the right word.

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