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Profile: NKM
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User Name: NKM
Forum Rank: Advanced Member
Occupation: Retired computer programmer; musician
Interests: Language in general, English in particular
Gender: Male
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Joined: Saturday, February 14, 2015
Last Visit: Wednesday, March 29, 2017 11:55:31 PM
Number of Posts: 3,205
[0.40% of all post / 4.13 posts per day]
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  Last 10 Posts
Topic: Are both questions correct?
Posted: Wednesday, March 29, 2017 11:38:50 PM
You're right, on all counts!

Topic: by which
Posted: Tuesday, March 28, 2017 10:22:45 PM
Yes — That makes sense.

But it's hard to use the future perfect without sounding like a prophet!

Whistle
Topic: Is and would
Posted: Monday, March 27, 2017 11:54:07 PM
Just to be charitable, perhaps?

Topic: is or are
Posted: Sunday, March 26, 2017 10:58:39 PM
Yes — It should be is.

"Together with", "as well as" and "along with" are not usually treated the same as "and." That is, they do not necessarily cause the combined subject to be treated as plural.

In this particular case, as YouKnow points out, it is clear that the attention and the person's feeling constitute a single "message."

Topic: I'm trying to explain in a simpler way the red part, but I don't find the way, could you help me, p
Posted: Sunday, March 26, 2017 10:48:24 PM
Hi, David -

In case you're not aware of it, let me suggest that there is a rather common hyphenated adjective "one-time," which can mean either "happening only once" or "happening in the past." (Context determines which meaning is intended.)

Topic: Unlikely
Posted: Sunday, March 26, 2017 10:42:22 PM
"Unlikely" here is an adjective, suggesting that Mr. Hardy is someone who would seem unlikely (unqualified?) to have become a star. Yet he is, apparently, a star.

Topic: The grammar is different
Posted: Saturday, March 25, 2017 7:32:46 PM
"Grammar" is essentially the way words are used. In this case, "the grammar is different" means that there are differences among these particular kinds of construction.

Topic: a or the
Posted: Saturday, March 25, 2017 7:28:17 PM
Personally, I'd be much more comfortable with using "the" — even though I can think of a number of words which would be more appropriate.

To my American ear, "a correct/right word " sounds strange.

Topic: grammatical vs grammatically correct
Posted: Friday, March 24, 2017 2:04:59 PM
That's right.

But, in everyday usage, most people would say that the two sentences have exactly the same meaning.

Topic: by which
Posted: Friday, March 24, 2017 2:02:06 PM
D00M wrote:
Hello

Which of the followings is correct?

WE need to mention a specific time in the future by which the action will be completely taken place.
WE need to mention a specific time in the future by which the action is completely taken place.
WE need to mention a specific time in the future by which the action will have been completely taken place.

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Are "WE" soothsayers, fortune tellers, or perhaps time travelers? If not, how are we to know when the action will have been completed?

I suspect you mean: "We need to mention a deadline by which time the action must be completed."

Or, better, "We need to specify a deadline for completion of the action."

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