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Profile: WeaselADAPT
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User Name: WeaselADAPT
Forum Rank: Advanced Member
Occupation: Freelance Editor; Disability Rights Advocate
Interests: Christ is my King; Stephen King, Pearl Jam
Gender: Male
Home Page http://facebook.com/WeaselADAPT
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Joined: Thursday, November 6, 2014
Last Visit: Tuesday, November 5, 2019 4:14:46 AM
Number of Posts: 318
[0.03% of all post / 0.17 posts per day]
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  Last 10 Posts
Topic: know something from a hole in the ground
Posted: Saturday, November 2, 2019 5:01:19 PM
Malty's answer/contribution was clear, brief and direct. The "vulgarity" was literally taken straight from TFD. Malty's only mistake, in my opinion, was not correctly applying the link:

https://idioms.thefreedictionary.com/not+know+your+ass+from+a+hole+in+the+ground

the Weasel
Topic: The Suda
Posted: Saturday, November 2, 2019 4:08:22 PM
Instead of using a purely alphabetical system, the lexicon’s compiler arranged its entries using what organizational structure?

Quote:
The lexicon is arranged alphabetically with some slight deviations from common vowel order and place in the Greek alphabet (including at each case the homophonous digraphs, e.g. αι,ει,οι, that had been previously, earlier in the history of Greek, distinct diphthongs or vowels) according to a formerly common in many languages system that is called ἀντιστοιχία, antistoichia; namely the letters follow phonetically in order of sound, in the pronunciation of the tenth century which is similar to that of Modern Greek.


the Weasel
Topic: engine room
Posted: Monday, October 28, 2019 11:48:27 PM
Great, thanks. Of course, being a wheelchair user or disabled means no longer being capable of being a team or group's "engine room."

You had a great opportunity here, TFD, and ya blew it!

the Weasel
Topic: Badlands
Posted: Sunday, October 27, 2019 8:37:36 AM
alibey1917 wrote:
"Such systems and deployments fit perfectly into a world where the enemy is deemed to be ‘within’ the domestic megacity; mobilisation is permanent within boundless ‘wars’ against drugs, terrorism, insurgency or political disruption; and the labyrinthine worlds of urbanised terrain sprawls toward, and beyond, the horizon. ‘Domestic’ helicop-ter deployments to the ‘badlands’ of the homeland thus become less and less distinguishable from full-on counterinsurgency operations against occupied colonies."

I found two idiomatic meaning of "badlands" that can be fitted to this sentence: 1- The area outside of your county’s jurisdiction; 2- The ghetto portion of North Philly! Can also be used to describe any ghetto parts of Philadelphia.

But, I can't be sure that these meanings are correct, and that the writer means that. Moreover, perhaps can we think of a third idiomatic meaning: urban concrete jungle?

What do you think?

The source: Vertical by Stephen Graham


Hi, Ali.

Again, I think the key to truly grasping this passage is just before the text you've shared. This begins with, "Such systems and deployments," which makes me think it must have just described the nature and destinations of those deployments. That is the context that is really needed in order to confirm what this passage is trying to say.

Without having access to that text, I would say that the phrases, "a world where the enemy is deemed to be ‘within’ the domestic megacity," and, "the labyrinthine worlds of urbanised terrain sprawls toward, and beyond, the horizon," tell us that the bad guys are, indeed, hiding somewhere within the immediate/nearest, great, sprawling cityscape, so that's probably what he's referring to as "the badlands."

Honestly, I think the last sentence of the passage you've shared speaks more to the idea that the author views himself as a more capable writer than he really is; that he believes this flowery, self-made vocabulary is a big hit with the readers, when it actually just has everyone scratching their heads and thinking they are the dumb ones for having such trouble with the "professional author's" text. For instance, unless he has previously described what "full-on counterinsurgency operations against occupied colonies" looks like, then the contrast he's attempting to pull off between that and these "'Domestic' helicopter deployments to the 'badlands' of the homeland" kind of falls flat (in my opinion).

In conclusion, from what we have to work with here, I think "urban concrete jungle" (where "jungle" implies there's a lot of bad guys hiding in the bushes) is a pretty spot-on definition for what Graham is referring to as "the badlands." I also think Sar's explanation of how the term has evolved adds a very helpful perspective.

the Weasel
WeaselWorks Freelance Editing
Topic: Not nearly
Posted: Sunday, October 27, 2019 7:59:10 AM
Atatürk wrote:
The British do not eat nearly as much fish as the Spanish.

The Spanish eat a lot more fish than the British.

Do they both mean the same?


Hi, Turk.

Yes, they do mean the same.

Quote:
The British do not eat nearly as much fish as the Spanish. <-- The British do not eat as much. = The British eat less. = The Spanish eat more.

The Spanish eat a lot more fish than the British. <-- The Spanish eat more.


Also, these sentences even match each other's intensifiers:

Quote:
The British do not eat nearly as much fish as the Spanish. <-- = The British eat a lot less fish than the Spanish.

The Spanish eat a lot more fish than the British. <-- = The Spanish eat a lot more fish than the British.


I hope this helps (rather than makes things worse). It looks to me like I made a mess of things!

the Weasel
WeaselWorks Freelance Editing
Topic: whom or which
Posted: Sunday, October 27, 2019 7:41:57 AM
Koh Elaine wrote:
The migrants, six of which were thought to have been Vietnamese, were naked or had minimal clothing when they were found in the container on Wednesday in Essex.

Should it be "whom" instead?

Many thanks.


Yes, indeed. Great catch!

the Weasel
WeaselWorks Freelance Editing
Topic: It is not much comfort to me to know that ...
Posted: Sunday, October 27, 2019 7:39:09 AM
onsen wrote:
Hello,

Quote:

It is not much comfort to me to know that everyone else has money problems too.
(Harrap’s Standard Learners’ English Dictionary)


I’d like to use 'also' or 'as well' instead of the 'too' at the end of the example sentence.
How does one do that?

My try:
as to 'also'
It is not much comfort to me to know that everyone else also has money problems.

as to 'as well'
It is not much comfort to me to know that everyone else has money problems as well.

Thank you.


Both of your tries are exactly what I would have suggested, Onsen, if attempting to replace "too" with your alternatives. And frankly, I prefer your "also" line over ther other.

the Weasel
WeaselWorks Freelance Editing
Topic: Sylvia Plath (1932)
Posted: Sunday, October 27, 2019 2:09:31 AM
Quote:
Her literary reputation grew rapidly after her death, and she became the first poet to win what prize posthumously?

In 1982, she won a Pulitzer Prize posthumously, for The Collected Poems.

the Weasel
Topic: To live was then in itself a delight, because living implied seeing.
Posted: Sunday, October 27, 2019 1:23:29 AM
Please—just start calling these Excerpts of the Day! They often make little sense or hold little value as nuggets of wisdom when taken outside of the context in which they originated.

the Weasel
Topic: Using En Dashes to Indicate a Range of Values
Posted: Sunday, October 27, 2019 1:15:44 AM
Phew! Until I reached the end, this lesson was making me think I'd been making a major mistake for quite some time:

Quote:
It’s also not uncommon to see an en dash used instead of an em dash, especially in published writing. Again, this is not the preferred mark according to the majority of style guides, but it is not necessarily incorrect. If en dashes are used, they should be surrounded by spaces to avoid making the words appear too close together.


the Weasel

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