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Profile: AlyonaSunlight
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User Name: AlyonaSunlight
Forum Rank: Advanced Member
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Joined: Wednesday, October 1, 2014
Last Visit: Wednesday, October 9, 2019 12:56:37 PM
Number of Posts: 401
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  Last 10 Posts
Topic: Most popular synonyms for “tired”
Posted: Wednesday, October 9, 2019 12:56:37 PM
Hello!

I’ve found these 24 synonyms for the word “tired”.
I wonder which of them would you mark as the most popular and widespread (like top 5 or something like that)?
Except for “exhausted” I know it’s widely used.

1. I'm exhausted.
2. I'm (dead) beat.
3. I'm drained.
4. I'm worn out.
5. I'm done in.
6. I'm spent.
7. I'm dead on my feet.
8. I'm running on empty.
9. I'm fatigued.
10. I'm tired out.
11. I'm weary.
12. I'm dog tired.
13. I'm bone-weary (bone tired, tired to the bone).
14. I'm knackered.
15. I'm dragging.
16. I'm bushed.
17. I'm dead-tired.
18. I'm shattered.
19. I'm whacked.
20. I'm running on fumes.
21. I'm wiped out.
22. I'm wrung out.
23. I'm knocked out.
24. I'm pooped. (US?)


Thank you in advance!
Topic: Lyrics “High Hopes” - Panic at the Disco
Posted: Wednesday, September 25, 2019 11:17:02 AM
thar, thank you very much !
Topic: Lyrics “High Hopes” - Panic at the Disco
Posted: Wednesday, September 25, 2019 9:48:09 AM
Hello everyone!

My question is based on the lyrics of the song “High Hopes” (Panic at the Disco)

“... Mama said
It's uphill for oddities
The stranger crusaders
Ain't ever wannabes
The weird and the novelties
Don’t ever change...”

I’d like to know what the word “novelties” means in this situation.
Should it be translated as “unusual people”? Or are they compared to “cheap toys”?

And I’d also like to understand the meaning of this line:
“The stranger crusaders ain’t ever wannabes”

Is it like:
Those who take part in crusades are not those who want to become famous/successful etc 🤪

I do realize that sometimes songs lyrics don’t makes much sense but who knows maybe it’s not one of those cases.

Thank you in advance!
Topic: Wellington boots in the USA, Canada and Australia
Posted: Thursday, September 12, 2019 3:33:28 AM
Hello!
Could you tell me, please, what the most common names for “Wellington boots” are:

In the USA
Canada
Australia

On Wikipedia I found this:

the USA and Canada -
rubber boots, also galoshes, mud boots, rain boots, mucking boots, billy boots, or gum-boots.

Australia - "gumboots" or "gummies", "wellies".

I’d like to know if this information is accurate enough.

Thank you in advance.
Topic: Order of adjectives
Posted: Thursday, September 12, 2019 3:29:38 AM
Hello everyone!
Basically, I have three questions about the order of adjectives.

1. Could you, please, tell me which order is correct?

#1

1️⃣ opinion
2️⃣ size
3️⃣ AGE
4️⃣ SHAPE
5️⃣ colour
6️⃣ origin
7️⃣ material
8️⃣ purpose

#2

1️⃣ opinion
2️⃣ size
3️⃣ SHAPE
? CONDITION
4️⃣ AGE
5️⃣ colour
6️⃣ origin
7️⃣ material
8️⃣ purpose

2. Where should I put the word “dirty” because not all classifications include “condition” and I assume in this case it beings to “opinion”?

For example, dirty / old / silk tie
What is the correct order, in your opinion?

Thank you in advance!
Topic: chill / chill out / chillax / unwind / wind down
Posted: Sunday, July 21, 2019 5:34:00 PM
Hello, everyone!

Could you explain me, please, the difference (if any) between these words:

to chill / chill out / chillax / unwind / wind down?


Thank you in advance!
Topic: Shiver, tremble, shudder, quake, quiver, shake
Posted: Tuesday, July 16, 2019 6:45:51 AM
Thank you so much, FounDit and Drag0nspeaker!!! You are the best!
Topic: Shiver, tremble, shudder, quake, quiver, shake
Posted: Monday, July 15, 2019 2:18:21 PM
Hello! I have a few questions about the following words:

TO SHAKE is the most general word.

TO QUIVER is a light degree of shaking
Almost unnoticeable
Due to nerves or excitement
Often used for describing “lips”

TO SHIVER is a bit stronger than quiver
Due to cold, fear

TO TREMBLE is stronger than shiver
Due to fear, nerves, excitement, anger, weakness

TO SHUDDER is stronger than tremble due to fear, horror, disgust

TO QUAKE is stronger than shudder
Due to shock, fear, anger??? (Not sure about these 3)



Do I get the difference and usage of these verbs correctly?
Is the order of them correct? (According to the degree of shaking)

And where would you put SHAKE itself?


THANK YOU IN ADVANCE!


 


Topic: either of / neither of
Posted: Wednesday, April 3, 2019 4:16:55 PM
Thank you very much!
Topic: either of / neither of
Posted: Wednesday, April 3, 2019 7:40:42 AM
Hello!
I'm a bit confused by the rule of "either of/neither of" because I've read different explanations in different sources and sometimes they contradicted each other...

I know that "Neither of" can take both plural and singular verbs:
Neither of the restaurants we went to was (or were) expensive.

But what about either? In some sources it was stated that it can take only singular, while in some other books I've seen it was used with plural verbs.

So, the question is: Can we say -
Either of the restaurants we went to was (or were) expensive.

Maybe this particular sentence sounds clumsy but it doesn't matter really in this case).

Thank you in advance!

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