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Profile: tunaafi
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User Name: tunaafi
Forum Rank: Advanced Member
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Joined: Tuesday, June 03, 2014
Last Visit: Sunday, April 30, 2017 6:59:56 PM
Number of Posts: 3,897
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  Last 10 Posts
Topic: Bernie Sanders on tRump's first 100 days
Posted: Sunday, April 30, 2017 12:44:36 PM
I should miss the depth of the intellectual content, the sharpness of the wit and the extent of the vocabulary if I stopped reading them

Far away is close at hand in images of elsewhere – The Master of Paddington.
Topic: Pronunciation of flower and flour
Posted: Sunday, April 30, 2017 5:21:11 AM
Both the Cambridge English Pronouncing Dictionary and the Longman Pronunciation Dictionary give the same phonetic transcriptions for both words.

Far away is close at hand in images of elsewhere – The Master of Paddington.
Topic: Where would you like to go?
Posted: Sunday, April 30, 2017 4:28:44 AM
Yes.

Far away is close at hand in images of elsewhere – The Master of Paddington.
Topic: better/had better
Posted: Saturday, April 29, 2017 5:44:00 PM
NKM wrote:
I've never heard anyone (child or not) say "bettn't " — whereas I may have heard "oughtn't " once or possibly even twice during my whole life.

The difference is that 'oughtn't' was the recognised and correct question-tage form in BrE when I was at school hald a century ago. 'Ought not' was the only standard negative; 'didn't ought' was marked as incorrect.

I have heard 'bettn't' (and then only rarely) from very young children, who tend make many grammaical mistakes caused by false analogy.


"The negative is ought not. Didn't ought, hadn't ought and shouldn't ought, heard in some southern regions of England, are all vulgarisms."

Wood, F T (1954), The Groundwork of English Grammar, London: MacMillan

Far away is close at hand in images of elsewhere – The Master of Paddington.
Topic: No, Mr. President, You Can't Just Do What You Want - Really?
Posted: Saturday, April 29, 2017 12:51:51 PM
Hope123 wrote:
I wonder what his supporters think of these five changes made quietly.

I imagine that mentally-ill hunters who like shooting hibernating bears and wolves and then dumping their bodies in streams will be pretty happy, as will those who win contacts by bribing foreign politicians.

Bears, wolves and ethically-minded business people probably aren't Trump supporters anyway, so these measures will just reinforce their prejudices.


Far away is close at hand in images of elsewhere – The Master of Paddington.
Topic: Bernie Sanders on tRump's first 100 days
Posted: Saturday, April 29, 2017 11:28:01 AM
palapaguy wrote:


Oscar, take your political crap to an appropriate forum where others just might be interested in it. It's annoying to have to put up with it in a grammar forum such as this one.



How many times do we have to tell you that this is the [bpPolitics[/b] forum? The grammar forum is
here.

Far away is close at hand in images of elsewhere – The Master of Paddington.
Topic: Trump uses executive orders at unprecedented pace
Posted: Saturday, April 29, 2017 11:23:54 AM
palapaguy wrote:

Oscar, take your politics elsewhere. You're unnecessarily annoying others in this forum.


If one doesn't agree with a person's views, one often finds them annoying. That's something one has to live with in a politics forum.


Far away is close at hand in images of elsewhere – The Master of Paddington.
Topic: better/had better
Posted: Saturday, April 29, 2017 10:01:35 AM
The absence or inaudibility of the 'd is so common with some people that I have heard young children say "We better go in now, bettn't we?"

Far away is close at hand in images of elsewhere – The Master of Paddington.
Topic: I had been in Italian love since years [Present Perfect, Past Perfect tense]
Posted: Friday, April 28, 2017 3:49:46 AM
A cooperator wrote:


Thanks a lot, Tunaafi
Have you listened to the audio file?

Yes. I reported what I heard.


Quote:
Finally: why do you think it was it not said as follows:
I've had an Arab lover for years.


The present perfect would be correct, if the speaker still had an Arab lover. However, I detected no trace of a /v/ sound.


Quote:
Or
I'd had an Arab lover for years.


I detected no trace of a /d/ sound, and there is no context to suggest that a past perfect would be appropriate.


Quote:

Moreover, I think "years" is a time period, the preposition "for" must be used, not "since". As a result, a present perfect or past perfect must be used since "for" or "since" are used with either.

'For' + time period can be used with any tense. A perfect aspect is appropriate only if the duration up to a later time point is important:

I worked in China from January to August 2002.
I worked there for eight months.
(from a to b)

When I left China, I had worked there for eight months.
(up to b)


Far away is close at hand in images of elsewhere – The Master of Paddington.
Topic: Would be easier
Posted: Friday, April 28, 2017 3:31:27 AM
'Would' is the back-shifted form of 'will' in this reported thought.

He did not necessarily think it would be 'easy', merely 'easier' (less difficult') than it avtually is.

Far away is close at hand in images of elsewhere – The Master of Paddington.

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