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Profile: Priscilla86
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User Name: Priscilla86
Forum Rank: Advanced Member
Occupation: Architect
Interests: Language
Gender: Female
Home Page http://rushbijoux.blogspot.sg/
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Joined: Wednesday, May 28, 2014
Last Visit: Friday, October 13, 2017 6:05:19 AM
Number of Posts: 902
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  Last 10 Posts
Topic: Does the verb to study fit here?
Posted: Thursday, September 07, 2017 6:47:02 AM
robjen wrote:
I am not sure if it makes sense to say: you study the following subjects.

(1) I like to study fashion design.

(2) I like to study plumbing.

(3) I like to study baking arts.

(4) I like to study baking.

(5) I like to study culinary arts.

Thanks for your help.

Hello, robjen!

First of all, there should be 'would' before 'like' as in "I'd like to study...". It means you want to study certain subjects. But if the emphasis is on the 'like' then I'd use a gerund as in "I like studying fashion."

Back to your question, here's my two cents:

(1) I'd like to study fashion design. Sounds OK.

(2) I'd like to study plumbing. Makes sense grammatically but I don't know if it sounds natural. I usually hear people say "I'd like to be a plumber" or "I'm taking a course on plumbing" because it's a vocational training, not a class in a university. Technically there are university classes about plumbing-related subjects but I think they will use terms more high brow than 'plumbing' Whistle Perhaps other members who are native speakers could advise you on this.

(3) I'd like to study baking arts. Personally, I'd do a minor tweak: "I'd like to study the art of baking."

(4) I'd like to study baking. I think people usually say "I'd like to learn how to bake." unless you really mean you want to study baking without being a baker yourself, then you might as well use (3), because if you are going to study baking, might as well the artsy kind, right?Whistle

(5) I'd like to study culinary arts. Sounds OK.




The greatest thing you'll ever learn is just to love and be loved in return.
Topic: Nepal outlaws menstration huts.
Posted: Tuesday, September 05, 2017 4:34:03 AM
I wonder if introducing fines will persuade those who wax lyrical about "keeping traditions alive" to finally abandon this archaic practice?

I often joke with my friends that people would eat dirt or go to jail for what they believe in, but impose a hefty fine and those ideals would go out the window faster than the speed of light.

I remember reading about the Polish plait (feel free to Google it but fair warning: it's very gross) and how its popularity finally dwindled after some politician proposed to impose fines and tax on those having a Polish plait.


The greatest thing you'll ever learn is just to love and be loved in return.
Topic: Last Minute
Posted: Monday, July 24, 2017 1:40:59 AM
Ah, yes, that's it! Thanks, Ilker.

The greatest thing you'll ever learn is just to love and be loved in return.
Topic: Last Minute
Posted: Sunday, July 23, 2017 11:08:46 PM
Is there a more formal way to say 'last minute' as in 'Unfortunately, Mr. ABC and Ms. XYZ were unable to attend due to the last-minute nature of the meeting'? FYI, this is for a minutes of meeting.

The greatest thing you'll ever learn is just to love and be loved in return.
Topic: Sprinkler
Posted: Wednesday, July 12, 2017 11:38:51 PM
Do native speakers say 'the building is sprinklered' to refer to a building with a sprinkler system?

The word 'sprinklered' is not recognized by TFD and Microsoft Word. In my line of work, I have to know if a sprinkler system is provided in a building to calculate the escape distance to exit doors. We usually say "Is it sprinklered?". I wonder what native speakers say.

There is the word 'sprinkled' but I feel it has a different meaning when I say 'is it sprinkled?'. I feel like I'm not asking whether a building is equipped with a sprinkler system, I feel like I'm buying donuts.


The greatest thing you'll ever learn is just to love and be loved in return.
Topic: Which one(s) sound(s) natural to native English speakers?
Posted: Tuesday, July 11, 2017 5:27:38 AM
Ashwin Joshi wrote:



If you are asking some other person like a friend, an unknown person or somebody else. then, it should be :

(2) What is the procedure for renewing one's passport?


Ashwin Joshi is right about the distinction between asking an officer and a friend but I'd like to add that, depending on the setting, 'one' might sound a little formal. In casual American setting, I'd use a general 'your': "What is the procedure for renewing your passport?"

'One' might sound OK in casual British setting though I'm not so sure. Hopefully other members can advise you on that.


The greatest thing you'll ever learn is just to love and be loved in return.
Topic: Shouldn't it be 'were' instead of 'was'?
Posted: Tuesday, July 11, 2017 5:01:17 AM
thar, I happen to have a colleague who just went to Iceland recently, so I asked him. He said he didn't know about this hot dog stall (though he is the type who doesn't do much research before going somewhere. But he went with a tour so I'm surprised that they didn't take him there. They took him to - surprise, surprise - the Blue Lagoon. But he said he went to an 'Americanized street' where there was a cowboy-themed shop. I wonder if this hot dog stall is located there.

Why is this hotdog chain such an institution, though? Do you frequent this chain?


The greatest thing you'll ever learn is just to love and be loved in return.
Topic: Which one(s) sound(s) natural to native English speakers?
Posted: Tuesday, July 11, 2017 4:29:38 AM

Hi!

"How do I renew my passport?" --> This sounds natural to me. This is what I would use and what I've heard most often. It is understood to mean that you want to know the steps to renew or procedure of renewing your passport, so if you want to be more specific with your question, either (1) or (2) would work.

Sentence (3) however...doesn't sound quite right to me Think

The correct preposition is 'of': "What is the process of renewing my passport"

I still don't like it but it's probably a personal preference issue. To me, I'll use 'process' if I want to get an emotionally descriptive answer instead of a more matter-of-fact one.

"What's the process like?"
"Oh, awful. I stood in line for two hours!"


The greatest thing you'll ever learn is just to love and be loved in return.
Topic: the cooling of the refrigerator or the cooling temperature of the refrigerator
Posted: Tuesday, July 11, 2017 3:57:40 AM
Hello, luckyguy! My two cents:

I still prefer your original sentence to the other two sentences. I especially don't like sentence #2 because it gets cooler as the temperature decreases, so it creates a confusion when you say 'increase' the cooling temperature.

A little context would help here. Do you want to make the temperature of your fridge even cooler or has it stopped cooling things and you want to make it work again?

For the former, you can say "how do I set the temperature of my/this refrigerator?" You don't need to specify whether you want to set it cooler or warmer, once you know how to set the temp, you can do as you wish.

For the latter, you can say "how do I fix my/this refrigerator?"

edit: the suggestion above is based on what sounds 'natural' meaning how native speakers would usually say it in certain situation, which may not be what people in your native language would say in the same situation. If what you want is a direct translation, you can say "How do I make the temperature cooler?"


The greatest thing you'll ever learn is just to love and be loved in return.
Topic: Shouldn't it be 'were' instead of 'was'?
Posted: Tuesday, July 11, 2017 12:39:48 AM
Drag0nspeaker wrote:


I would expect him to be offered a rent subsidy, not a rental subsidy.


I don't catch the difference. Could you elaborate on why 'rental subsidy' is wrong?

=======================

thar, about 'hawker', it is a local term.

To understand this use, you need to know the history a little bit: Before the rapid urbanization in the 1950s and 1960s, Singapore used to have a lot of street food hawkers much like those found in less developed countries today. They were unlicensed and varied in terms of hygiene. The Government sought to standardize them, so they took these hawkers off the street, put them in a proper sheltered place with shared tables and chairs for patrons, and traded their carts with stalls and so, hawker centers were born.

They are what you would call 'food courts' in the US, not sure in UK or Europe. They are termed so because they started off as centers for hawkers. Nowadays, most stalls are operated by the second or third generation of the original 'hawkers' who haven't been 'hawkers' in the actual sense of the word in a long time - or they may even be new players on the scene - but they are still called 'hawkers'.

Hawker centers specifically refers to those without air-conditioning and bare-minimum service. No tax. No receipt. You collect the food yourself and (ideally) clean up after yourself though not many observe this rule.

Another term that has been localized which you may find amusing is 'coffee shop'. In Singapore, some people refer to a small hawker center as a 'coffee shop'. They usually have the same set-up as hawker centers (no AC, shared tables and chairs) but with only 3-4 food stalls plus a drink stall, unlike in the US where it refers to a single-vendor establishments such as Starbucks or a cafe.


The greatest thing you'll ever learn is just to love and be loved in return.

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