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Profile: navi
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User Name: navi
Forum Rank: Advanced Member
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Joined: Friday, May 16, 2014
Last Visit: Thursday, September 19, 2019 3:58:37 AM
Number of Posts: 428
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  Last 10 Posts
Topic: including
Posted: Monday, September 16, 2019 5:10:15 AM
Is this sentence correct:


1) He taught me how to operate this machine, including the safety mechanisms.


Gratefully,
Navi
Topic: which I have never done before
Posted: Wednesday, September 11, 2019 4:10:58 PM
Thank you all very much,

"He called my uncle by his first name, which I have never heard before."

That's interesting. I think in that sentence 'which I have never heard before' modifies 'his first name'. I also think that it has to be 'which I had never heard before'....

Gratefully,
Navi
Topic: a great number of...
Posted: Monday, September 9, 2019 6:14:09 AM
Thank you very much, Romany,

Come to think of it, you're right! I hadn't given a serious thought to the number I was using. I should have used 'hundreds' probably... A least...

Topic: a great number of...
Posted: Monday, September 9, 2019 4:30:13 AM
Which are correct:

1) A great number of accidents indicates that there is something wrong with the policies adopted by urban authorities.

2) Tens of accidents in our city indicate that there is something wrong with the policies adopted by urban authorities.
3) Tens of accidents in our city indicates that there is something wrong with the policies adopted by urban authorities.

4) In a city like ours, tens of accidents indicate that there is something wrong with the policies adopted by urban authorities.
5) In a city like ours, tens of accidents indicates that there is something wrong with the policies adopted by urban authorities.

6) Tens of accidents would indicate that there is something wrong with the policies adopted by urban authorities.


The idea in every case is that: 'The occurrence of.... indicates that there is something wrong with the policies adopted by urban authorities.

Gratefully,
Navi
Topic: are the same
Posted: Friday, September 6, 2019 5:38:44 AM
1) In every letter he sent today, the first five sentences are the same.
2) In each letter he sent today, the first five sentences are the same.
3) In all the letters he sent today, the first five sentences are the same.

What do these sentences mean?

a) All the letters begin with the same five sentences.
b) All the letters begin with the same sentence repeated five times

I think both meaning are possible, but common sense would dictate meaning 'a'... Not sure though...


Gratefully,
Navi
Topic: so that/such that
Posted: Monday, September 2, 2019 4:28:39 AM
1) We will arrange things so that I can meet him this afternoon.
2) We will arrange things such that I can meet him this afternoon.

Which can be used if the intended meaning is:
We will arrange things in such a way that I can meet him this afternoon.


3) He pushed me so that I'd fall.

4) He pushed me such that I'd fall.

Which can be used if the intended meaning is:
He pushed me in such a way that I'd fall.

Gratefully,
Navi

Topic: like you did
Posted: Saturday, August 31, 2019 1:34:01 AM
1) He did things like you did.

Can '1' have both these meanings:

1a) He did things as you did. He did things in the way you did.

1b) He did things like the ones you did.

=================

2) He said things like you did.


Can '2' have both these meanings:

2a) He said things as you did. He said things in the way you did.

2b) He said things like the ones you said.

=================

3) He said things like you said.

Can '3' have both these meanings:

3a) He said things as you did. He said things in the way you did.
3b) He said things like the ones you said.

I think '1' is ambiguous, but '2' and '3' aren't. As far as I can see '2' corresponds to '2a' and '3' corresponds to '3b'.

I think '1', '2' and '3' are informal.

Gratefully,
Navi
Topic: away from
Posted: Saturday, August 31, 2019 1:18:39 AM
1) That was three years away from his graduation from high school.
2) That was three years from his graduation from high school.

3) He was three years away from graduating from high school.
4) He was three years from graduating from high school.


Can one tell if 'away from' and 'from' mean 'before' or 'after' in these sentences?

Gratefully,
Navi
Topic: from... to
Posted: Thursday, August 29, 2019 3:16:27 PM
Which are correct:

1) Between eleven o'clock and noon there were six phone calls. I didn't answer any of them.

2) From eleven o'clock till noon there were six phone calls. I didn't answer any of them.
3) From eleven o'clock to noon there were six phone calls. I didn't answer any of them.

Gratefully,
Navi
Topic: you would never believe
Posted: Wednesday, August 21, 2019 12:53:13 AM
Thank you both very much,

Now, I have another question, if I may. It is about one of DraOnSpeaker's sentences.


When writing his letter, he made such bad/terrible/stupid mistakes you'd never believe it.

Is the 'it' at the end of the sentence necessary?
Could the sentence work without it?

I don't think it could, but I am not sure.

Gratefully,
Navi



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