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Profile: navi
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User Name: navi
Forum Rank: Advanced Member
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Joined: Friday, May 16, 2014
Last Visit: Wednesday, April 17, 2019 2:21:45 PM
Number of Posts: 378
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  Last 10 Posts
Topic: stolen objects
Posted: Tuesday, April 16, 2019 11:00:54 PM
1) Do not think about stolen objects.
2) Do not worry about stolen objects.

Could this mean:
a) Do not worry/think about the fact that objects might or will be stolen. Do not worry about the theft of objects?

Or does it only mean: Do not worry/think about the objects that have already been stolen.

Gratefully,
Navi
Topic: afraid of
Posted: Friday, April 5, 2019 1:03:39 AM
1) I am worried about his failing the test.
2) I am worried about his failure.

3) I am afraid of his failing the test.
4) I am afraid of his failure.

Have the 'failing' and the 'failure' already taken place, am I sure they will happen, or am I worried that they might happen?



Gratefully,
Navi
Topic: afraid of fighting
Posted: Tuesday, April 2, 2019 10:26:56 PM
Which are correct:

1) Who are you afraid of fighting?

2) Who are you worried about helping?

3) Who are you worried about coming here?

Meaning: The possibility of whose coming here worries you?



4) Who are you worried about losing?

Two possible meanings:
4a) You are worried about losing someone. Who is that person?
4b) You are worried that someone might lose. Who is that person?

Gratefully,
Navi


Topic: the painting in the living room
Posted: Monday, March 25, 2019 3:01:00 AM
1) I sold the painting in the living room.

Isn't that sentence ambiguous?

a) I sold the painting that was in the living room.
(Maybe I sold it somewhere else)
b) In the living room, I sold the painting. (Maybe I never hung it up in the living room. Maybe it was in the living room for a very short time)

Gratefully,
Navi
Topic: the man at the post office
Posted: Monday, March 25, 2019 2:58:50 AM
1) I was running in the park today and ran into the man from the post office.

2) I was running in the park today and ran into the man at the post office.

Let's say that we have met a man at the post office, or I have talked to you about a man I met at the post office. I meet this man again in the park. Which of the sentences '1' or '2' could I use?

Does '1' necessarily implies that he works at the post office?

Gratefully,
Navi
Topic: all or some?
Posted: Saturday, March 23, 2019 1:12:38 AM
Thank you very much, DragOnSpeaker,

Would these work:



1a) We have not studied all of his works, let alone any by his mentors.


3a) We have not studied all of his works, not to mention any by his mentors.


I think they make clear that we haven't studied any works by his mentors, but do they work?!!

Gratefully,
Navi
Topic: all or some?
Posted: Friday, March 22, 2019 10:59:43 PM
1) We have not studied all of his works, let alone those of his mentors.
2) We have not even studied all of his works, let alone those of his mentors.


3) We have not studied all of his works, not to mention those of his mentors.
4) We have not even studied all of his works, not to mention those of his mentors.



Do these mean we have studied none of his mentors works or only some of them?

Gratefully,
Navi
Topic: for doctors
Posted: Wednesday, March 6, 2019 1:40:14 PM
Are all of these sentences correct and correctly punctuated:

1) This is a device that is extremely precise for doctors.
2) This is an extremely precise device for doctors.


3) This is a device that is extremely precise, for doctors.
4) This is an extremely precise device, for doctors.


===========================================
5) This is a device that is extremely expensive for doctors
6) This is an extremely expensive device for doctors.

Aren't '5' and '6' ambiguous?

Gratefully,
Navi
Topic: combined sum of money
Posted: Thursday, February 28, 2019 1:59:26 PM
Which are correct:

1) Tom and Jane were paid one hundred dollars together.

2) Tom and Jane were paid one hundred dollars between them.
3) Tom and Jane were paid one hundred dollars collectively.
4) Tom and Jane were paid one hundred dollars jointly.


Let us say they did some work together and got one hundred dollars for it. They own the money jointly.

Gratefully,
Navi
Topic: in/with taking me
Posted: Tuesday, February 19, 2019 3:25:35 PM
1) She was a great help taking me to the hospital.
2) She was a great help with taking me to the hospital.
3) She was a great help in taking me to the hospital.

In which case:
a) she took me to the hospital
in which:
b) she helped those who took me to the hospital
and in which case
c) The sentence is ambiguous?


Gratefully,
Navi



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