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Profile: navi
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User Name: navi
Forum Rank: Advanced Member
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Joined: Friday, May 16, 2014
Last Visit: Friday, May 26, 2017 3:21:58 AM
Number of Posts: 318
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  Last 10 Posts
Topic: even though crazy
Posted: Friday, May 26, 2017 3:21:58 AM
1) He is extremely smart, even though crazy.
2) He is extremely smart, although crazy.
3) He is extremely smart, even if crazy.
4) He is extremely smart, if crazy.

Which of these mean:
a) He is extremely smart, although he is crazy.
and which mean:
b) He is extremely smart, although he might be crazy.

Gratefully,
Navi.
Topic: during the First World War
Posted: Saturday, May 20, 2017 1:49:43 AM
Which are correct:

1) St. Bartholomew's Day Massacre, in 1572, is another example of what
religious intolerance can do.

Meaning: St. Bartholomew's Day Massacre, which took place in 1572, is another example of what religious intolerance can do.


2) The First World War, from 1914 to 1918, claimed many civilian lives.
Meaning: The First World War, WHICH TOOK PLACE from 1914 to 1918, claimed many civilian lives.

3) The Russian Revolution, during the First World War, was seen by many as a turning point in history.
Meaning: The Russian Revolution, WHICH TOOK PLACE during the First World War, was seen by many as a turning point in history.

Gratefully,
Navi.
Topic: after the release of their first album
Posted: Sunday, May 14, 2017 2:32:04 AM
Can one use:
1) Their concerts, during the second half of the year, made them even more popular.
instead of:
2) Their concerts, which took place during the second half of the year, made them even more popular.


Can one use:
3) Their concerts, after the release of their first album, made them even more popular.
instead of:
4) Their concerts, which took place after the release of their first album, made them even more popular.


Can one use:
5) The peasant uprising, in the first half of the sixteenth century, were very violent.
instead of:
6) The peasant uprising, which took place in the first half of the sixteenth century, were very violent.

Gratefully,
Navi.
Topic: articles to read
Posted: Saturday, May 13, 2017 4:24:13 PM
1) I have articles to read tonight.
2) There are articles I have to read tonight.


Can't these sentences mean two things:

a) There are articles I am obligated to read tonight.
I am sorry, but I can't go to the movies tonight. I have articles to read./There are articles I have to read.

b) There are articles I can read tonight. (I won't be bored. I have something to do.)
Last night I really got bored, but tonight I have articles to read/there are articles I have to read.


Gratefully,
Navi.
Topic: in the bedroom
Posted: Wednesday, May 03, 2017 4:32:56 AM
1) He burned the books in the bedroom.

Can't this sentence have two different meanings:
a) In the bedroom, he burned the books. (Maybe he took them to the bedroom from elsewhere.)
b) He burned the books that were in the bedroom. (Maybe he burned them somewhere else.)

Gratefully,
Navi.
Topic: some/certain/any
Posted: Tuesday, May 02, 2017 3:42:35 AM
1) From where I was, I couldn't tell if some of those men were injured or not.
2) From where I was, I couldn't tell if certain of those men were injured or not.

Can't these sentence have two meanings:

a) I couldn't tell if any of those men were injured or not. Maybe none of them was injured and maybe some of them were.

b) As far as I could tell, it was possible some specific men among those men were injured. I couldn't tell if some specific men among those men were injured or not. As regards the others, I could tell.

Gratefully,
Navi.
Topic: tense question/might be and might have been
Posted: Tuesday, May 02, 2017 3:33:00 AM
Thank you very much, DragOnspeaker, for this wonderful and detailed reply!

Your reply was truly brilliant. I thought I had everything covered, but you came up with a case I had not thought about!

How about these sentences:

3) As far as I could tell, he might have spent time in prison.


4) As far as I could tell, he might have been in prison.

5) As far as I could tell, he might have been imprisoned.

I think we have two cases:

a) He was not in prison at the time I was talking about, but have been in prison at a time prior to that.

b) He might have been in prison at the time I was talking about. (Maybe I was on the phone with him and I thought to myself: "He might be in prison."

I think '3' corresponds to 'a' and '4' and '5' are ambiguous and could mean either 'a' or 'b' depending on the context.

Gratefully,
Navi.
Topic: tense question/might be and might have been
Posted: Tuesday, May 02, 2017 1:51:57 AM
1) I met a man and woman seven years ago in a restaurant. As far as I could tell, they might be husband and wife.

2) I met a man and woman seven years ago in a restaurant. As far as I could tell, they might have been husband and wife.

Is there a difference in the meanings of the above sentences?

Which could be used if NOW I think they might be husband and wife NOW?
Which could be used if BACK THEN I thought they might be husband and wife BACK THEN?
Which could be used if BACK THEN I thought they might be a divorced couple?

Gratefully,
Navi.
Topic: for routine meals at home for her family
Posted: Thursday, April 20, 2017 4:43:41 AM
1) She sometimes uses canned beans for this dish and other dishes for routine meals at home for her family.


Can't this sentence be parsed in two ways?

"For routine meals at home for her family' could be postmodifying 'other dishes'. 'other dishes for routine meals at home for her family'could be a single unit, a noun phrase.

It could also be a sentence adverbial. The sentence could be equivalent to:

2) For routine meals at home for her family, she sometimes uses canned beans for this dish and other dishes.


Is that correct?

Gratefully,
Navi.




Topic: in order for him to win
Posted: Thursday, March 16, 2017 5:01:45 AM
1) What did Pete do for John to win the match?
2) What did Pete do in order for John to win the match?

Do these mean that Pete wanted John to win the match?
Do they imply that Pete actually did win?

Is this one correct:
3) What mistake did Pete make for John to win the match?

Does it imply that Pete deliberately made a mistake for John to win?


Gratefully,
Navi.

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