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Profile: navi
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User Name: navi
Forum Rank: Advanced Member
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Joined: Friday, May 16, 2014
Last Visit: Monday, October 15, 2018 2:55:51 PM
Number of Posts: 349
[0.04% of all post / 0.22 posts per day]
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  Last 10 Posts
Topic: the best ever
Posted: Monday, October 15, 2018 2:54:39 PM
Which are correct:

1) Hendrix was the best rock guitar player ever.

2) Hendrix was the best rock guitar player to have ever lived.
3) Hendrix was the best rock guitar player to ever live.

The idea is that even after his death no one matched him.


Gratefully,
Navi

Topic: to take care of you
Posted: Monday, October 15, 2018 1:10:46 AM
1) Jane is the nurse to take care of you.

Does that mean:

a) She's the best nurse there is for taking care of you
or:
b) She's the only nurse there is for taking care of you
or:
c) She's the nurse who is capable of taking care of you (this is basically the same as 'a')
or:
d) She's the nurse who has been given the task of taking care of you

Gratefully,
Navi
Topic: happy for them to win
Posted: Sunday, October 14, 2018 2:49:30 PM
Which are correct:
1) I am happy that they won the game.
2) I am happy for them to have won the game.
3) I am happy for them to win the game.


Can '3' refer to a game that they have already won?

Is there a difference in the meanings of '1' and '2' and '3'?


Gratefully,
Navi
Topic: happy for
Posted: Sunday, October 14, 2018 2:47:52 PM
1) I am happy for him to go to jail.

Is he going to jail now or is he going to go to jail?
Could one say that sentence if one doesn't like him and doesn't think that going to jail will benefit him?

Gratefully,
Navi
Topic: not for anything
Posted: Friday, October 12, 2018 2:06:40 AM
1) She won't do it for anything.
2) She will do it for nothing.

Which means
a) There's nothing that can make her do it
and which means
b) She'll do it for free
and which means
c) She'll do it, but for no particular reason or for any gain

I doubt that '1' could be used for 'b'. But can't it be used for 'c'?

Consider:
A) She won't do it for anything (in particular). It'll just be an irrational impulsive act.

And can't '2' have all three meanings?

Consider:
B) She'll stop for nothing.

Gratefully,
Navi

Topic: I gave him what he wanted
Posted: Friday, October 5, 2018 2:15:21 PM
1) He said he had wanted what I gave him.
2) He said he wanted what I gave him.

3) He said he had wanted what I had given him.
4) He said he wanted what I had given him.


In which cases:
a) The wanting came before the giving (he wanted something and I gave it to him)
in which:
b) The wanting came after the giving (he wanted what I had given him again)
in which:
c) We had a period of time in which I provided him with what he wanted
and in which cases:
d) One cannot tell

Gratefully,
Navi
Topic: what might happen/what will happen
Posted: Friday, October 5, 2018 1:16:35 AM
1) I'm curious to see what might happen next.
2) I'm curious to see what will happen next.

Is there any difference in the meanings of these sentences?

Does '2' imply that something will necessary happen, while '2' leaves open the possibility of nothing happening?

I don't think there is a real difference. But I'd still say that the speaker probably considers the chances of nothing happening higher if he or she utters '1'?


One could argue that if nothing happens, something has still happened!

Gratefully,
Navi
Topic: frequently/usually
Posted: Thursday, October 4, 2018 2:37:50 PM
Another wonderful reply from Dragonspeaker!

Thank you so very very much!

Respectfully,
Navi
Topic: frequently/usually
Posted: Thursday, October 4, 2018 1:49:11 AM
I'd like to ask a follow question here.

Does this one work at all:

5) I can't see my son usually. (Note the absence of comma before 'usually')

It sounds strange to me. For some reason, I get the feeling that it means

5a) I can't see my son in the usual way.

I don't know if that is possible though. Could 'usually' mean 'in the usual way'?

Gratefully,
Navi
Topic: frequently/usually
Posted: Wednesday, October 3, 2018 4:07:24 AM
Thank you all very much, especially Dragonspeaker, who once again provides a wonderful and detailed reply!

I had mistyped '4'. Sorry about that. Dragonspeaker read my mind and corrected it as it was supposed to be corrected!

4) I can't usually see my son.

Respectfully,
Navi

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