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Profile: navi
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User Name: navi
Forum Rank: Advanced Member
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Joined: Friday, May 16, 2014
Last Visit: Friday, March 24, 2017 4:35:05 PM
Number of Posts: 309
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  Last 10 Posts
Topic: in order for him to win
Posted: Thursday, March 16, 2017 5:01:45 AM
1) What did Pete do for John to win the match?
2) What did Pete do in order for John to win the match?

Do these mean that Pete wanted John to win the match?
Do they imply that Pete actually did win?

Is this one correct:
3) What mistake did Pete make for John to win the match?

Does it imply that Pete deliberately made a mistake for John to win?


Gratefully,
Navi.
Topic: like some others
Posted: Monday, March 13, 2017 4:33:29 PM
1) I am not beholden to anyone like some of the other members of our party are.
2) I am not beholden to anyone as some of the other members of our party are.

3) I am not beholden to anyone the way some of the other members of our party are.

4) I am not beholden to anyone, like some of the other members of our party are.
5) I am not beholden to anyone, as some of the other members of our party are.

Which of the above mean:

a) I am not beholden to anyone, but some of the other members of our party are.

and which mean:

b) I am not beholden to anyone in the same manner as some of the other members
of our party are.

Gratefully,
Navi.
Topic: there was Tom
Posted: Friday, March 10, 2017 5:48:39 PM
Thank you both very much,

So, basically those sentences seem impossible to you. There is no way

1) There was Tom injured in the accident.

would really be used. Right?

Gratefully,
Navi.
Topic: there was Tom
Posted: Friday, March 10, 2017 7:44:19 AM
Is this sentence correct:

1) There was Tom injured in the accident.

It is supposed to be -more or less- the equivalent of 'Tom was injured in the accident'.

A says: Was there anyone injured in the accident?
B replies: 2) Yes. There was Tom injured in the accident.

A says: Nobody was hurt in this town yesterday,
B replies: 3) -That's not true. There was Tom injured in an accident. And there was Jane who cut her hand.

I changed 'the' to 'an', but if they both know about the accident, then the second one will say 'the'.

I don't use this structure. I don't like it. But I think if it might work, especially if one is making a list.

Gratefully,
Navi.



Topic: a robot to teach
Posted: Friday, March 10, 2017 7:18:12 AM
Are these sentences correct:

1) They designed a robot to teach children English.
2) They made a robot to teach children English.

The robot is going to do the teaching.

Gratefully,
Navi.
Topic: like they do now
Posted: Thursday, March 09, 2017 6:34:09 AM
Thank you very much, Pjharvey,

I am not sure in which sentences 'like' should be replaced with 'as'.

Allow me to ask another question:

How about:

2) Back then, they didn't have fun activities as they do now in this establishment.

Does that correspond to 'a' or to 'b'?

It is clear that if we add the commas that exist in your version, then the meaning would be 'b'.

Gratefully,
Navi.
Topic: like they do now
Posted: Thursday, March 09, 2017 4:03:30 AM
1) Back then, they didn't have fun activities like they do now in this establishment.

Does this mean:
a) Back then, they didn't have fun activities like the ones they have now in this establishment.
or:
b) Back then, they didn't have any fun activities in this establishment, but they do now.

Gratefully,
Navi.
Topic: either here or there
Posted: Wednesday, March 08, 2017 3:00:23 AM
Thank you all very much,

Palapaguy, would you say that both sentences are ambiguous?
Could both be followed by 'I don't know which'?
In one scenario, he has been in one of the two places and the speaker doesn't know which place he has been in.

In the other scenario, his place has changed once or multiple times. I think that meaning could be rendered with:

3) For the last three months, he has been only in solitary confinement and in the prison clinic.

Do you see an ambiguity in '1' and '2'?

If I am not mistaken, Wilmar believes that '2' corresponds to the 'I don't know which' interpretation and '1' corresponds to the other one.

Gratefully,
Navi.
Topic: either here or there
Posted: Tuesday, March 07, 2017 5:37:26 AM
1) For the last three months, he has been either in solitary confinement or in the prison clinic.

2) For the last three months, he has been in solitary confinement or in the prison clinic.


Could these sentences be used if he spent part of the last three months in solitary confinement and part of it in the prison clinic?

Gratefully,
Navi.
Topic: any usage
Posted: Thursday, March 02, 2017 5:35:08 PM
Thank you very much, Romany,


1) "I think my experiences have shaped me. I think it's impossible for me now to ever fall in love."
"It's not impossible to love anyone. Even for you, I'm sure."


If I get it correctly, this one means: You might fall in love with anyone.



2) "Loving anyone is not impossible. But loving HIM is a different matter."


If I get it correctly, this one is a bit self-contradictory. It is rhetorical, I suppose. If 'loving anyone' is possible then loving HIM must be possible too. If one wanted to make the whole thing logically airtight, one would say "Loving anyone else is not impossible. But loving him is a different matter."

Have I got it?

Gratefully,
Navi.




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