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Profile: navi
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User Name: navi
Forum Rank: Advanced Member
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Joined: Friday, May 16, 2014
Last Visit: Monday, July 15, 2019 10:54:47 PM
Number of Posts: 406
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  Last 10 Posts
Topic: his time
Posted: Tuesday, July 2, 2019 4:07:10 AM
Thank you very much, DragOnspeaker,

So you'd go for:

1a) His talent, playing the guitar, was amazing.

That is almost like:

1b) His talent (playing the guitar) was amazing.

Isn't it?

Do you consider '1' (without the commas) incorrect?

Gratefully,
Navi

Topic: his time
Posted: Tuesday, July 2, 2019 2:30:18 AM
Which are correct:
1) His talent playing the guitar was amazing.
2) His talent for playing the guitar was amazing.
3) His talent at playing the guitar was amazing.

4) His time playing chess had to be reduced.
5) His time at playing chess had to be reduced.

Gratefully,
Navi
Topic: how is it possible
Posted: Saturday, June 22, 2019 3:05:15 AM
Which are correct:

1) How can he win a gold medal and I not even win a bronze?

2) How is it possible that he should win a gold medal and I not even win a bronze?


3) How can he be invited to that party and I not be invited?

4) How can he be invited to that party and not I?

5) How is it possible that he should be invited to that party and I shouldn't be?

Gratefully,
Navi
Topic: got his arm broken
Posted: Thursday, June 20, 2019 10:21:40 PM
Are these sentences correct:

1) He slipped on the wet stair, fell and got his arm broken.

2) He wanted to impress his girlfriend, so he jumped off the balcony and got his leg broken.

Gratefully,
Navi
Topic: as well as John on a stage
Posted: Thursday, June 20, 2019 10:19:18 PM
Thank you very much, FounDit,

How about:

2) I could walk like Brando right into the sun.
From the song It's Hard to be a Saint in the City by Bruce Springsteen

Source:
https://genius.com/Bruce-springsteen-its-hard-to-be-a-saint-in-the-city-lyrics

Does '2' mean:
a) I could walk right into the sun the way Brando walked right into the sun.
or:
b) I could walk right into the sun the way Brando walked.

Gratefully,
Navi
Topic: as well as John on a stage
Posted: Thursday, June 20, 2019 4:26:34 PM
1) I can act as well as John on a stage.

Can't this sentence have three meanings:

a) John doesn't act well on a stage. He acts well in another place (say, in front of a camera). I can act as well as him on a stage.
b) I can act as well as John acts on a stage.
c) I can act as well on a stage as John acts on a stage.

Gratefully,
Navi
Topic: my brother in Paris
Posted: Sunday, June 16, 2019 8:24:15 PM
1) I will write a letter to my brother in Paris.
2) I will write a letter to my brother who is in Paris.


Do both of these necessarily mean the same as:

3) I will write a letter to that brother of mine who is in Paris.

--------------------------------------

4) I will write a letter to my brother, in Paris.
5) I will write a letter to my brother, who is in Paris.


Do both of these necessarily mean the same as:

6) I will write a letter to my brother. My brother is in Paris.

----------------------------

I think '1' and '4' could also mean:
7) I will write a letter to my brother when I am in Paris.

Gratefully,
Navi
Topic: the tragic
Posted: Saturday, June 15, 2019 3:16:54 AM
Are these sentences correct:

1) One can feel the tragic of the play in the very first sentences.
2) The tragic of the story is what gives it depth.
3) One has to accept the tragic of life.

As far as I know 'tragic' is an adjective and not a noun. Now, I know sometimes certain adjectives can become abstract nouns if they are preceded by 'the' ('the beautiful', 'the real', 'the good'), but I don't think sentences 1-3 really work.
I'd have less of a problem with:

4) One has to acknowledge the tragic in life.

Here, it seems to me that 'the tragic' has sort of become an abstract noun akin to 'the beautiful'.


Gratefully,
Navi



Topic: who had seen the accident
Posted: Tuesday, June 11, 2019 10:49:22 PM
1) I talked to him who had seen the accident.
2) I talked to him, who had talked to you.

3) They arrested him who had caused the accident.
4) They arrested him, who had caused the accident.

5) They let him go who was innocent.
6) They let him go, who was innocent.

7) He who had seen the accident went to the police.
8) He, who had seen the accident, went to the police.

Which of the above would you consider grammatical?
I wouldn't use any of them, and don't any of them particularly natural. But I was curious to see if any of them would be considered grammatical.


Gratefully,
Navi
Topic: standing right behind him
Posted: Tuesday, June 11, 2019 10:16:36 PM
Thank you very much, FounDit,

I think I have a problem with '4' (with '3' as well).

Consider:

A) He heard a whisper. He turned around. It was Jane.

(I am just simplifying things)

Well, Jane was obviously not the whisper, but the whisperer. So what is 'It was Jane.' mean here?

I think one could argue that it means: 'It was Jane who had uttered the whisper.'

Would you say that is correct?

Gratefully,
Navi

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