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Joined: Thursday, May 15, 2014
Last Visit: Wednesday, May 23, 2018 1:07:27 PM
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  Last 10 Posts
Topic: driving down the street
Posted: Tuesday, May 22, 2018 2:11:40 AM
Thank you all so much.

Thank you Romany.

The question is whether an 'ing clause' at the end of the sentence always modifies the subject. Could it modify the object adjectivally?

I am trying to come up with sensible examples, but there seems to be a block in my mind!

How about these? Do they work? Don't the first two unambiguously mean Tom was wearing her wedding dress? Maybe they are ambiguous?

1. Tom kissed her wearing her wedding dress. (she was wearing the wedding dress)
2. Tom kissed her, wearing her wedding dress. (she was wearing the wedding dress)

3. I tripped him up walking out the door. (I tripped him up when he was walking out the door)
4. I tripped him up walking out the door. (I tripped him up when he was walking out the door)

5. I talked to her putting on her clothes. (I talked to her when she was putting on her clothes)
6. I talked to her, putting on her clothes. (I talked to her when she was putting on her clothes)


Many thanks.
Topic: driving down the street
Posted: Monday, May 21, 2018 3:13:34 AM
a. They injured him sitting behind the wheel of his car.
b. They injured him, sitting behind the wheel of his car.

c. They shot her in the shoulder driving down the street she lived on.
d. They shot her in the shoulder, driving down the street she lived on.

e. I talked to her driving down the street she lived on.
f. I talked to her, driving down the street she lived on.


Are these sentences correct if he was the one sitting behind the wheel of his car and she was driving down the street she lived on.



Many thanks


Topic: to pay and see
Posted: Sunday, May 13, 2018 1:24:30 PM
Can one say

a. These are some of our favorite stand-ups to watch. And now we are meeting them in person.
b. These are some of our favorite stand-ups to pay and watch. And now we are meeting them in person.

?

(b) is a bit jocular. We normally love to pay and watch these people, but now we are meeting them and talking to them for free!

Many thanks.

Topic: round and round and up
Posted: Sunday, May 13, 2018 1:23:14 PM
a. There was a sudden gust of wind. The leaves moved up and sideways.
b. There was a sudden gust of wind. The leaves moved up or sideways.
c. There was a sudden gust of wind. The leaves moved either up or sideways.



Which could be used if
1. All of the leaves moved up first and then sideways
and which could be used if
2. Some of the leaves moved up and the others moves sideways
and which could be used if
3. All the leaves moved up and sideways at the same time.
?

Could the sentences mean anything else?


Many thanks.
Topic: to learn how to keep pets
Posted: Monday, May 7, 2018 2:07:11 AM
Can one say

a. I gave him the flashlight to find his way.

b. I gave him the cat to learn how to keep pets.

c. Mother nature gave us this child to learn how wonderful life can be.

?


Many thanks.
Topic: under no amount of pressure
Posted: Sunday, May 6, 2018 3:28:09 AM
Thank you so much Thar.

This one is confusing. I had to think about it after reading your reply.

I'd say (a) means he gave in without being under pressure and (b) means he did not give in, no matter how much pressure he was under.

That said, I am not sure (a) is a good sentence.

Many thanks.
Topic: under no amount of pressure
Posted: Sunday, May 6, 2018 1:13:21 AM
Can one say
a. He gave in under no amount of pressure.
b. Under no amount of pressure did he give in.

?

Many thanks.
Topic: gave John and Patrcik a flashlight
Posted: Wednesday, April 25, 2018 1:06:47 PM
a. She gave John and Patrick fifty dollars.
b. She gave John and Patrick a knife and a flashlight.

c. She gave fifty dollars to John and Patrick.
d. She gave a knife and a flashlight to John and Patrick.


Can we tell if
1. John and Patrick each received fifty dollars/a knife and a flashlight
or if
2. John and Patrick together received fifty dollars/a knife and a flashlight
?

Many thanks.
Topic: gerund
Posted: Tuesday, March 20, 2018 12:16:38 PM
Can one use
a. Performing better than him will make him angry.
instead of
b. Your performing better than him will make him angry.

if the context makes it clear that we are talking about 'you'?

Can one use
c. Performing better than him will make him angry.

if the intended meaning is
d. When someone performs better than him he gets angry.
and the context makes the meaning clear?


Many thanks.
Topic: which they aren't
Posted: Tuesday, February 27, 2018 5:32:03 AM
Thank you both so much.

I thought as that part was parenthetical, the contraction would work nicely!

So you'd say these are better

a1. I think if they are not dumb, which a lot of them are not, they will soon realize that John is a charlatan.
b. I think if they are not dumb, which they are not, they will soon realize that John is a charlatan.


right?

Many thanks.

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