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Joined: Thursday, May 15, 2014
Last Visit: Saturday, November 30, 2019 4:37:18 AM
Number of Posts: 317
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  Last 10 Posts
Topic: which allowed the cat to run away
Posted: Wednesday, November 20, 2019 3:53:54 PM
Thank you very much, FounDit,

You are right. My question was not properly formulated. Do the sentences work? Do they convey the intended meaning correctly?


Many thanks
Topic: which allowed the cat to run away
Posted: Tuesday, November 19, 2019 5:01:10 PM
Are the following sentences grammatically correct?

a. The lights were on and the curtains were drawn back, which allowed the neighbors to see me dancing.

b. The cat was frisky and John forgot to close the window when he left, which allowed the cat to run away.

In (a) the combination of the two facts allowed the neighbors to see me dancing.
In (b) the only the second fact (John's forgetting to close the window) allowed the cat to run away.

Many thanks.
Topic: not only
Posted: Monday, November 18, 2019 2:43:42 AM
a. Not only you, but I can do that too.

b. Not only you can do that, but I can too.

c. Not only can you do that, but so can I.

d. Not only can you do that, but I can too.


Are the above sentences grammatically correct and meaningful?



Many thanks
Topic: useful for you
Posted: Saturday, November 16, 2019 11:37:40 PM
Thank you all very much!

I really appreciate your contributions!

I have to say that I said something like (a). It sounded very natural to me, but I suddenly started having doubts about it. Then I thought of this sentence:

e. This book is useful to understand the basic concepts of physics.


Does that sound correct?

It doesn't sound correct to me. I think you need 'for understanding'.

I am not sure at all, but if (e) is not correct, then can (a) be correct? Maybe... And maybe (e) is correct...

Many thanks.
Topic: useful for you
Posted: Friday, November 15, 2019 3:54:50 PM
a. This book is useful for you to understand the basic concepts of physics.
b. This book is useful for you for understanding the basic concepts of physics.
c. This book is useful to you for understanding the basic concepts of physics.
d. This book will be useful to you for understanding the basic concepts of physics.


Are these sentences grammatically correct?

Many thanks.
Topic: who is tall
Posted: Monday, November 11, 2019 11:18:23 PM
a. She is my favorite tall actress.
b. She is my favorite actress who is tall.
c. She is my favorite actress, who is tall.

The meaning of (c) is clear. She is my favorite actress and she is tall.

I think there's a difference between the meanings of (a) and (b).

It seems to me that in (a) is saying that among tall actresses she is my favorite. (Maybe none of my favorite actresses is tall and she isn't even among my favorite actresses. But if I had to chose among tall actresses then she'd be my favorite.)

To me, (b) seems to be saying that among my favorite actresses, she is the one who is tall. She is definitely one of my favorite actresses.

Is that right?

I am not sure (b) is really natural.

Many thanks.
Topic: a very expensive dress
Posted: Friday, November 8, 2019 12:45:34 AM
a. That is a very expensive dress, to be worn at official ceremonies.

b. That is a very expensive dress, to wear at official ceremonies.


Are the above sentences grammatically correct?
Is their punctuation acceptable?

Do they mean that the dress shouldn't be worn on occasions other than official ceremonies?


Many thanks.
Topic: to use in case of emergency
Posted: Saturday, November 2, 2019 10:33:12 PM
a. This is a flare gun, to use in case of emergency.
b. This is a flare gun, to use only in case of emergency.


c. This is a flare gun, to be used in case of emergency.
d. This is a flare gun, to be used only in case of emergency.


Are the above sentences grammatically correct? Obviously, 'only' changes the meaning somewhat. But does the comma work in those sentences? It is there to give the sentence a double focus. We are conveying two bits of information that are equally important. It is possible that the second part is added as an afterthought. In that case, it becomes less important.

Maybe the comma makes the following phrase non-defining. Maybe if there was no comma the implication would be that there are more than one flare guns and one is for use in case of emergency.

Many thanks.
Topic: like in the movies
Posted: Monday, October 28, 2019 11:03:53 PM
Thank you both so much.

One more question here:
Would the sentences work with the given meanings if 'like' is replaced only with 'as' (and not with 'as if')?

a1. Those men were talking AS in gangster movies.
(Meaning: They were talking the way they do in gangster movies.)

b11. The workers in the toy shop were wearing masks and capes, AS in superhero movies.

(Meaning: They were wearing masks and capes, and in that respect they were similar to people in superhero movies.)

Many thanks.
Topic: like in the movies
Posted: Monday, October 28, 2019 1:38:36 AM
a. Those men were talking like in gangster movies.
(Meaning: They were talking the way they do in gangster movies.)

b. The workers in the toy shop were wearing masks and capes, like in superhero movies.
(Meaning: They were wearing masks and capes, and in that respect they were similar to people in superhero movies.)

Are the above sentences grammatically correct?
Do they correspond to the given meanings?

In (a) their manner of talking is the same as the manner of talking in gangster movies.
In (b) it is not the manner that is the issue. In both cases, you have capes and masks, and that is what constitutes the similarity.


Many thanks.

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