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Profile: Konstantin Frolov
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User Name: Konstantin Frolov
Forum Rank: Newbie
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Joined: Wednesday, December 03, 2014
Last Visit: Sunday, January 07, 2018 12:39:39 PM
Number of Posts: 31
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  Last 10 Posts
Topic: Possessive case with the gerund
Posted: Sunday, January 07, 2018 10:17:13 AM
Oh, I'm terribly sorry, what I actually meant to write is 'stories about people mysteriously disappearing' and 'the President's mysterious disappearing'. As I'm writing this, however, it's getting clearer to me: in the first clause disappearing is a verb and a noun in the second. Am I right?

PS. The original sentence which aroused my question is 'Read on for 3 bizarre stories of people disappearing'
Topic: Possessive case with the gerund
Posted: Sunday, January 07, 2018 2:45:18 AM
Hi!

I'm feeling confounded about the absence of the possessive 's in the sentence 'the stories of people mysterious disappearances', whereas it's incorrect to omit it in 'the president's mysterious disappearance'. Could anyone kindly explain to me the difference and give a couple more examples on both cases?

Kind regards
Topic: Plural subject with singular verb
Posted: Saturday, November 18, 2017 3:25:47 AM
Thanks to both authors for very helpful answers!
Topic: Plural subject with singular verb
Posted: Friday, November 17, 2017 4:57:35 AM
Thank you for answering.

I'm afraid, however, the question still remains: what I was asking about is 'the short twenty years ... has taught me'
Topic: Plural subject with singular verb
Posted: Friday, November 17, 2017 4:08:44 AM
Hello!

In the sentence over here, the speaker uses the subject '20 years' with has. I've seen some similar cases but I still don't feel how to use that in my language correctly. Could anyone please briefly expand on the topic or provide a reference as to where the material may be found in grammar books or something?

Thanks!
Topic: Proper meaning of for
Posted: Sunday, November 12, 2017 1:48:55 PM
Thanks a lot!
Topic: Proper meaning of for
Posted: Sunday, November 12, 2017 4:53:46 AM
Hello!

Could anyone please explain the sense of the phrase in the clip? The speaker doesn't mean that during her speech the previous debater did but retell Twilight, does he? I'm then inclined to think that the clause 'for all her talk about true love' means: in spite of giving such a speech about true love, she is known to have been reading Twilight.
Is it correct? Is it possible that you give me a proper explanation otherwise?

Thanks!
Topic: Game of words or regular sentence?
Posted: Sunday, October 22, 2017 2:57:58 AM
Thank you very much for your answers
Topic: Game of words or regular sentence?
Posted: Saturday, October 21, 2017 10:09:49 AM
Hello!

Hope you'll find this no less interesting than I have.
video
Could you please share your opinion whether Mr.Pozner's phrase 'That's not the way you debate, unless maybe it is' is a game of words, where object 'you' refers to any person in general in the first clause and to his opponent exclusively in the second, having been used only once? Or is it just an ordinary way of speaking?

Thank you!
Topic: Decipher a phrase
Posted: Tuesday, February 21, 2017 10:38:27 AM
Sarrriesfan wrote:
The interviewer said 'have you always been musical'.
I hope this helps.


Thank you very much! That solved the problem.

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