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Daemon
Posted: Friday, May 15, 2015 12:00:00 AM
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Aoi Matsuri

One of the three major festivals of Kyoto, Japan, the Aoi Matsuri, or Hollyhock Festival, is believed to date from the sixth century. The festival's name derives from the hollyhock leaves adorning the headdresses of the participants; legend says hollyhocks help prevent storms and earthquakes. Today, the festival, which was revived in 1884, consists of a re-creation of the original imperial procession. Some 500 people in ancient costume parade with horses and large lacquered oxcarts carrying the "imperial messengers" from the Kyoto Imperial Palace to the shrines. More...
striker
Posted: Friday, May 15, 2015 8:56:04 AM
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springtime in japan are full of festivals
monamagda
Posted: Friday, May 15, 2015 11:09:14 AM

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Aoi Matsuri in Kyoto, the world's oldest festival




15th May, 2014 |at the Kamigamojinja and Shimogamojinja shrines, Kyoto

Aoi Matsuri in Kyoto has been called the world's oldest festival. Held at the Kamigamojinja and Shimogamojinja shrines, it features a procession with 600 or so men, women and children dressed in costumes like those worn by nobles and members of the Imperial court in the Heian Period (794-1185). The men wear white or grey tunics with wedge shaped black hats and women wear bright orange kimonos.
Also featured in the procession are huge decorated carts pulled by oxen with orange-colored yokes and costumed riders on horseback that shoot arrows at three targets 100 meters apart while riding at a full gallop. The festival gets its name from the aoi or hollyhock leaves carried by the participants.
The festival dates back to a time when Kyoto was often ravaged by floods and local people asked the gods for help. When relief appeared the people showed their thanks by throwing a festival. The central act of the festival is the offering of aoi leaves as a sign of respect to gods of Kamigamo and Shimogama shrines.

official website ›› http://kanko.city.kyoto.lg.jp/
Absurdicuss
Posted: Friday, May 15, 2015 7:33:36 PM

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It does not appear, from the photo, to be a happy festival.


"Now" is the eternal present.
Stvn
Posted: Friday, May 15, 2015 9:30:10 PM
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What a Wonderful World. Full of cultures and colours.

Most of the face make-ups and masks worn in the Japanese, Korean or Chinese culture festivals do not have a smiley face, but it doesn't mean that it's a gloomy event.
Absurdicuss
Posted: Friday, May 15, 2015 10:23:40 PM

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All better now.

Thanks Stvn Dancing


"Now" is the eternal present.
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