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While the laughter of joy is in full harmony with our deeper life, the laughter of amusement should be kept apart from it.... Options
Daemon
Posted: Wednesday, May 6, 2015 12:00:00 AM
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While the laughter of joy is in full harmony with our deeper life, the laughter of amusement should be kept apart from it. The danger is too great of thus learning to look at solemn things in a spirit of mockery, and to seek in them opportunities for exercising wit.

Lewis Carroll (1832-1898)
sandeep patra
Posted: Wednesday, May 6, 2015 1:49:02 AM

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Very true keeping a eye on our activities does create the discipline not to hurt others...Applause
marija15.4.2015.
Posted: Wednesday, May 6, 2015 2:11:51 AM
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I think this is true. Very nicely said.
JUSTIN Excellence
Posted: Wednesday, May 6, 2015 2:12:16 AM

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I've realized that joy is a state of being I can recognize as ever present in the very core of my being. Mr. Carroll as you implied; the state of being should be solemn and not mean to be seen like a mockery. Then I begin to look at joy. Joy can only be experienced in the present moment. It’s not something that happens in the past or future. It functions on a linear basis of past causes and future effects... Joy and being are constant, outside time. Joy is experienced in the present moment.




pedro
Posted: Wednesday, May 6, 2015 4:09:08 AM

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Daemon wrote:
While the laughter of joy is in full harmony with our deeper life, the laughter of amusement should be kept apart from it. The danger is too great of thus learning to look at solemn things in a spirit of mockery, and to seek in them opportunities for exercising wit.

Lewis Carroll (1832-1898)



He bears the look of one who has endured far too much amusement
Bully_rus
Posted: Wednesday, May 6, 2015 4:27:13 AM
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Some say that boredom have itself dangers just as well. Anyway, balance is of the essence... And if not, who cares?
belll
Posted: Wednesday, May 6, 2015 5:30:27 AM

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True true true. Mockery being just silly stuff, joy being the enjoyment of life's great moments. The sort of laughter that brings warmth to the heart even if its a 60second laugh it seems like eternity and everytime you remember the laughter it just brings healing and comfort to soothe every other heart ache

😊
Wagner Douglas
Posted: Wednesday, May 6, 2015 7:06:15 AM
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So very true!!!!

I totally agree with beIII.

THis quote can be found on the book: The Life and Letters of Lewis Carroll.
ChristopherJohnson
Posted: Wednesday, May 6, 2015 7:07:33 AM

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He is one of my favourite writers who have greatly influenced my world outlook, taste, and everything. God bless your soul, Charles L. Dodgson!
mudbudda669
Posted: Wednesday, May 6, 2015 8:47:34 AM

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This is almost impossible not to do . . .
striker
Posted: Wednesday, May 6, 2015 8:52:35 AM
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i dislike very much when people ridicule other for what they wear or how they look etc. very disturbing.
striker
Posted: Wednesday, May 6, 2015 8:53:22 AM
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i dislike very much when people ridicule other for what they wear or how they look etc. very disturbing.
Milica Boghunovich
Posted: Wednesday, May 6, 2015 10:04:19 AM
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Daemon wrote:
While the laughter of joy is in full harmony with our deeper life, the laughter of amusement should be kept apart from it. The danger is too great of thus learning to look at solemn things in a spirit of mockery, and to seek in them opportunities for exercising wit.

Lewis Carroll (1832-1898)


Applause Applause Applause Ha, ha, ha!!!
Gary98
Posted: Wednesday, May 6, 2015 10:32:43 AM

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such nuanced feelings
monamagda
Posted: Wednesday, May 6, 2015 10:57:49 AM

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The quote in its context from : THE LIFE AND LETTERS OF LEWIS CARROLL -(REV. C. L. DODGSON)
Chapter VIII - Page 315


"My Dear Dora,—In correcting the proofs of "Through the Looking-Glass" (which is to have "An Easter Greeting" inserted at the end), I am reminded that in that letter (I enclose a copy), I had tried to express my thoughts on the very subject we talked about last night—the relation of laughter to religious thought. One of the hardest things in the world is to convey a meaning accurately from one mind to another, but the sort of meaning I want to convey to other minds is that while the laughter of joy is in full harmony with our deeper life, the laughter of amusement should be kept apart from it. The danger is too great of thus learning to look at solemn things in a spirit of mockery, and to seek in them opportunities for exercising wit. That is the spirit which has spoiled, for me, the beauty of some of the Bible. Surely there is a deep meaning in our prayer, "Give us an heart to love and dread Thee." We do not mean terror: but a dread that will harmonise with love; "respect" we should call it as towards a human being, "reverence" as towards God and all religious things.

Yours affectionately,

C.L. Dodgson."

http://www.gutenberg.org/files/11483/11483-h/11483-h.htm#CHAPTER_IX_T
Victor Alexandre Berto Pereira
Posted: Wednesday, May 6, 2015 11:11:14 AM

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too intense for me Shhh
Lizanne
Posted: Wednesday, May 6, 2015 12:19:00 PM

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JUSTIN Excellence wrote:

I've realized that joy is a state of being I can recognize as ever present in the very core of my being. Mr. Carroll as you implied; the state of being should be solemn and not mean to be seen like a mockery. Then I begin to look at joy. Joy can only be experienced in the present moment. It’s not something that happens in the past or future. It functions on a linear basis of past causes and future effects... Joy and being are constant, outside time. Joy is experienced in the present moment.




Thank you Justin, Your writing is the one that resonates within me.
Thanks, Elizabeth in NY~
Bobby Angell
Posted: Wednesday, May 6, 2015 2:31:03 PM

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I think many of us do this more as we age, we become cynical and sarcastic instead of joyful and wondrous. Leave it to Lewis Carol to point out the difference.
Tirumal Jallepalli
Posted: Wednesday, May 6, 2015 5:15:45 PM

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The quote on its own is noteworthY, but there is a lot more to it than that - quite a bit deeper and more illuminating. We get that by studying what MONANAGDA has supplied us. He provided quotation by Rev. C. L. Dodson from "THE LIFE AND LETTERS OF LEWIS CARROLL." My comments on the quoted text therein; The last points should be like this: "NOT JUST respect towards humans, Reverence NOT ONLY toward god and all things religious. For human is religious as human is god's creation and devotes himself to god's service. Reverence therefore should be towards human as well;that then be truly harmonious and joyful.
Bobby Angell
Posted: Wednesday, May 6, 2015 6:36:18 PM

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I think he nailed that one right on the frumious bandersnatch.
Verbatim
Posted: Thursday, May 7, 2015 6:52:01 PM
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Daemon wrote:
While the laughter of joy is in full harmony with our deeper life, the laughter of amusement should be kept apart from it. The danger is too great of thus learning to look at solemn things in a spirit of mockery, and to seek in them opportunities for exercising wit.

Lewis Carroll (1832-1898)


Just as well, that laughter of amusement should be separated from the laughter of joy: the latter being in full harmony with our deeper life
is also the hardest to bring up.

Most of us seldom experience that laughter of joy, much like the natural freedom. Amusement is what we get, at best, and there is little solemnity in that.
But we laugh easier when amused.

Today's anniversary of the Ninth Symphony gala debut in Vienna brings to mind "The Ode to Joy" and how "Freude" (joy) replaced "Freiheit" (freedom) in Schiller's title
for the poem that inspired Beethoven's choral final movement. --TFD Today in History: "The Ninth Symphony was premiered on 7 May 1824 in the Theater am Kärntnertor in Vienna."
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