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Oxygenated toothpaste Options
pedro
Posted: Tuesday, April 27, 2010 11:07:19 AM

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I discovered that my eyesight is fading whilst unpacking my groceries and discovering that the toothpaste I had purchased contained tiny inserted bubbles of ....oxygen !

I always thought that Oxygen (other than the diluted version we inhale) was very damaging like other free radicals. Is this so?

There is also the faint possibility that with over-vigorous brushing I might set my teeth on fire. Insights welcome.

All good ideas arrive by chance- Max Ernst
RuthP
Posted: Tuesday, April 27, 2010 11:23:06 AM

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I suspect what you have is toothpaste with hydrogen peroxide added. Hydrogen peroxide provides a great many free-radicals. Due to this, it is a mild bleaching agent and a mild disinfectant. Use also, however, runs the risk of irritating gum tissues, particularly if the concentration is too high or too frequent.
Galad
Posted: Tuesday, April 27, 2010 11:59:32 AM

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For years I've been concerned about the same thing: setting my teeth on fire while brushing. In order to guard against this, I typically keep plenty of cold beer by my side.

The Law often allows what Honor Forbids- Bernard-Joseph Saurin
Susie
Posted: Tuesday, April 27, 2010 12:05:32 PM

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Galad wrote:
For years I've been concerned about the same thing: setting my teeth on fire while brushing. In order to guard against this, I typically keep plenty of cold beer by my side.

Good idea!! My husband will love this one!Applause
I once heard of a woman who used butter to brush her teeth and had her children doing so as well.
There is also oxygen infused (?) with my laundry detergent, so with all that agitation going on should I worry about my washing machine catching fire? Oh the worries of cleanlinessThink
Vickster
Posted: Tuesday, April 27, 2010 1:03:48 PM

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For years my mother made us use baking soda to brush our teeth...now I have sensitive teeth and no enamel on my teeth... UGH!! Galad... got any cures for this that I might like... the beer cure is a great one!!!

He who sings scares away his woes. ~Cervantes
Anthony57
Posted: Tuesday, April 27, 2010 1:35:51 PM

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Great comments. However, could it be that the manufacture is in fact using oxygen as a filler (a four once tube of toothpaste = 3.5 ounces of paste and 0.5 ounces of oxygen)? Of course, the cost would remain the same since you are buying 4 ounces of something. Sufferin’ succotash. LOL

Living is easy with eyes closed ~ misunderstanding all you see. Dr. Winston O’Boggie
kisholoy mukherjee
Posted: Tuesday, April 27, 2010 3:48:07 PM

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Yeah, RuthP is right. I think it is hydrogen peroxide that you are talking about, Pedro. It is H2O2, and the anion is O2 with an oxidation number of -2, instead of the normal anion of O (-2). It actually consists of single covalent bond between two oxygen atoms. It is hence, unstable and highly reactive. Which is why it helps in cleansing.
For more details: (from wiki)

In inorganic chemistry, peroxide is the anion O22−. It is highly basic, and present in ionic compounds. Pure peroxides (containing only cations and the peroxide anions) are usually formed by burning alkali metals or alkaline earth metals in air or oxygen. Sodium peroxide Na2O2 is a typical example.

The peroxide ion contains two electrons more than the oxygen molecule. These two electrons, according to the molecular orbital theory, complete the two π* antibonding orbitals. This has as result a weakening of the bond strength of the peroxide ion and a greater length for the bond O-O : Li2O2 130 pm to BaO2 147 pm. Furthermore, the peroxide ion is diamagnetic.

The peroxides of the alkali metals and Ca, Sr and Ba are ionic. The peroxides of a number of electropositive metals such as Mg, the lanthanides and the uranyl-ion show an intermediary character, between ionic and covalent. The peroxides of metals such as Zn, Cd and Hg are mainly covalent.

Peroxides are powerful oxidizers, and usually fairly unstable. Ionic peroxides react with water and diluted acids to form hydrogen peroxide. Organic compounds are oxidized to carbonates, even at normal temperatures. Sodium peroxide is a powerful oxidator of metals, such as iron.

The oxides, peroxides and superoxides are closely related, forming a chain of oxygen ions of progressively higher oxidation number.

Barium peroxide is used in pyrotechnics and tracer ammunition, and was once used in the manufacture of hydrogen peroxide. Sodium peroxide is used as a carbon dioxide absorber and oxygen regenerator (e.g. in some submarines), through the reaction:

2 Na2O2 + 2 CO2 → 2 Na2CO3 + O2

Gotcha, bud, again
kisholoy mukherjee
Posted: Tuesday, April 27, 2010 3:50:17 PM

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I think some of the most recommended toothpastes are those with KF (potassium Fluoride) or any fluoride for that matter, because they go easy on the gums and teeth.

Gotcha, bud, again
grammargeek
Posted: Tuesday, April 27, 2010 4:41:30 PM

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grammargeek
Posted: Tuesday, April 27, 2010 5:07:22 PM

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I don't know what brand you bought, Pedro, but I found this article on the contents of a Colgate version of oxygenated toothpaste. I've never bothered to read the list of ingredients in any toothpaste before now. Who knew?


WIRED MAGAZINE: ISSUE 15.10

What's Inside: Colgate Whitening Oxygen Bubbles Brisk Mint Toothpaste
By Patrick Di Justo Email 09.25.07

Sodium Monofluorophosphate
A type of fluoride. Tooth enamel — made mostly of the mineral hydroxyapatite — is vulnerable to the acids in food, plaque bacteria, and saliva. Fluoride's job is to bind with the existing enamel to form a new compound, fluora patite, which is more resistant to these acids. Brushing with a fluoride toothpaste (or drinking fluoridated tap water) actually re engineers your teeth. Is it safe? Yes: The only bodily fluid contaminated by fluoridation is urine.

Hydrated Silica
You know those packets of silica gel that come with electronic gear? The ones that are clearly labeled DO NOT EAT? Same stuff. Here it's used as a gentle abrasive to scrub food and plaque stains from the teeth. Turns out it's not really poisonous.

Propylene Glycol
Remember the headlines about contaminated Chinese toothpaste? Bootleggers were using cheaper diethylene glycol, which, like its propylene cousin, is a syrupy liquid that acts as a thickener and moisturizer. Of course, DEG is toxic and sometimes used as antifreeze.

Tetrasodium Pyrophosphate
This phosphate coats the surface of your choppers to prevent tartar (calcified plaque) from attaching to the enamel.

Sodium Bicarbonate
Good old baking soda. It's another gentle abrasive, even better than hydrated silica at penetrating scratches in tooth enamel. It also neutral izes acidic saliva, creating foamy bubbles in the process.

Sodium Saccharin
Most chemicals in toothpaste taste bitter. Manu facturers could mask this with sugar, but that would kind of defeat the point. So instead, the companies turn to artificial sweeteners — in this case, saccharin.

Pentasodium Triphosphate
Another phosphate, this substance bonds to food particles, preventing them from settling on the outer surface of the teeth and causing stains.

Sodium Lauryl Sulfate
This is the detergent part of the toothpaste, the stuff that makes most of the lather when you brush (it shows up in shampoo for the same reason). It has a strange side effect, though: It desensitizes the taste buds that register sweetness. That's why orange juice tastes so awful right after you brush your teeth — your tongue is picking up only the sour and bitter flavors. As the amount in your mouth diminishes after brushing, your taste buds return to normal.

Carrageenan
Seaweed gum. You'll find it almost everywhere if you look hard enough. This is essentially the paste in toothpaste.

Flavor
In this case, brisk mint. The taste likely comes from real mint, but the brisk? Probably roasted malt. In 2001, a team of German scientists identified a chemical in malt that tells certain skin receptors to feel "cool." Of course, "brisk" might also come from any number of recently discovered chemical additives that stimulate the cold receptors in the mouth.

Sodium Hydroxide
Sitting down? This is the chemical name for lye. A drain cleaner. In your toothpaste. It's here to neutralize the pH of other ingredients. It may also be one of the main reasons the box warns, "If more than used for brushing is accidentally swallowed, get medical help..."

Calcium Peroxide
When you brush, this stuff breaks down into calcium chloride — a whitening agent — and a few oxygen radicals. Peroxide could burn the inside of your mouth, but generally there is too little in toothpaste to do any real damage.
Susie
Posted: Tuesday, April 27, 2010 5:14:59 PM

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Grammageek, that had to be one of the best, thurough answers yet. Great job, I learned something again from this site. What a great place to check into. I even have my daughter read many of these postings (she calls them blogs- darn teens think they know everything).
I read many lables, but have to admit, I have not read the toothpaste, but I will when I get home.Applause Applause
nooblet
Posted: Tuesday, April 27, 2010 5:46:09 PM

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Interesting break down, GG. As for the silica not being toxic, it true that it is not toxic and passes through the system no problem. The silica gel packets CAN be harmful, because they only partially consist of silica dioxide. It's the dopants, fungicides, and pesticides that are sometimes contained within the silica gel that are dangerous. Read more here: http://encyclopedia.thefreedictionary.com/Silica+gel
Lady Penelope
Posted: Tuesday, April 27, 2010 9:27:27 PM

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Thanks for the info GG, Applause I will be looking more carefully at the content when I buy the next lot of toothpaste. I remember an aunt would only use salt to clean her teeth, uugh.Sick

Plan for tomorrow, live for today, learn from yesterday.
pedro
Posted: Wednesday, April 28, 2010 4:11:11 AM

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Thanks for the very thorough and informative replies. I think I'll use salt from now on and save the Colgate for the drains.

All good ideas arrive by chance- Max Ernst
AnthA1G
Posted: Wednesday, April 28, 2010 1:13:29 PM

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I will try brushing my teeth with salt when I run out of toothpaste.

When I was a kid I always asked for sweet toothpaste, the ones with cool colors and shining pieces of I-don't-know-what, just to eat it!!!!! Was somebody in here that insane also? Sick


Every heart sings a song, incomplete, until another heart whispers back. Those who wish to sing always find a song. At the touch of a lover, everyone becomes a poet. - Plato
Raparee
Posted: Wednesday, April 28, 2010 1:38:35 PM

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GG, if you can find toothpaste with xylitol instead of saccharin, you'd be doing your mouth a favor. It's a sugar-substitute, 99% natural (no idea on the other 1%?), and it is HIGHLY preferred by dentists as it actually helps change the biochemistry in your mouth and helps prevent cavities (from what I gather, the bacteria that causes cavities love the sugar in our mouths, but they can't digest xylitol, so they starve to death - hence, no cavities!). I know you can order these, but haven't actually looked in the grocery store to see if any are using xylitol on a regular basis. If I can find some, I will definitely switch. I just spent all of last year and quite a bit of money fixing up the cavities I had.

It also tastes REALLY GOOD and you can buy it in stores now. :D Great for diabetics and those watching sugar intake too. I do not know, however, if people sensitive to artificial sweeteners have a problem with the natural sugar substitutes like xylitol and stevia. Wiki has a neat page on it and while I knew it could be VERY bad for dogs (they can't metabolize it right and can lead to liver problems and/or death in severe circumstances...much like dogs shouldn't have avocado and onions), apparently, it does great for cat dental hygiene. Weirdness.


A closed mind is like a closed book - nothing can be gained if either remains closed.
grammargeek
Posted: Wednesday, April 28, 2010 2:43:16 PM

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Raparee wrote:
GG, if you can find toothpaste with xylitol instead of saccharin, you'd be doing your mouth a favor.

Just to clarify, I personally do not use Colgate toothpaste of any type. I don't technically have an allergy to it, but something similar. However, I know that Colgate is a popular brand in many countries, and it was the easiest for me to find information (and pictures) of their oxygenated version.

I'm a Crest girl myself, my favorite being Crest Whitening Expressions Cinnamon Rush toothpaste. I also have a partial tube of Crest Sensitivity. Neither tube lists the full ingredients of its contents--only the "active" ingredient/s. A moderate online search did not yield that information, either. No wonder I'd never read the full list of ingredients on the toothpaste I use! It seems they don't want to be found.

On the other hand, I also currently have a can of Sensodyne Iso-active Foaming Gel. It actually does list the inactive ingredients, in addition to the active ones. Unfortunately, I do see saccharin on that list.
Raparee
Posted: Wednesday, April 28, 2010 3:10:18 PM

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Hmmm, that is odd they don't list the inactives. Curious indeed! Now I will have to check my toothpaste when I get home (I'm an Ultrabrite gal, which may be a sub-brand of Colgate, I'm not entirely sure).

Actually, amazon lists its ingredients and mine also contains saccharin and sorbitol. Interesting. And apparently, it rated very highly at removing stains and not damaging teeth, per Consumer Reports! Here I was just buying it because it was cheaper, seemed to do well by me (no sensitivity, good cleaning), and it had a mild flavor (I hate strongly-flavored toothpaste!). Hmm, wonder if I can ask them to create a xylitol enhanced version? :D

I just went to the dentist for my cleaning and they were practically overjoyed that I liked xylitol and were going on about it, so I thought I'd bring it up, since you mentioned the sugar. It was rather amusing, actually. It's in a lot of sugar-free gums now, taking the place of aspartame.


A closed mind is like a closed book - nothing can be gained if either remains closed.
Jyrkkä Jätkä
Posted: Wednesday, April 28, 2010 3:41:18 PM

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Raparee wrote:

I just went to the dentist for my cleaning and they were practically overjoyed that I liked xylitol and were going on about it, so I thought I'd bring it up, since you mentioned the sugar. It was rather amusing, actually. It's in a lot of sugar-free gums now, taking the place of aspartame.


"Xylitol was first derived from Birch trees in Finland in the 19th century and was first popularized in Europe as a safe sweetener for diabetics that would not impact insulin levels. Today, using maize sources, most world supplies reportedly come from China." (quote from TFD)
Dancing Dancing Dancing




In the beginning there was nothing, which exploded.
nooblet
Posted: Wednesday, April 28, 2010 3:47:43 PM

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Birch trees are amazing, and obviously the source of birch beer, the greatest soft drink in all the world.
Raparee
Posted: Wednesday, April 28, 2010 4:04:14 PM

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*grins* When I saw it was Finnish in origin, I thought immediately of you, JJ. ;)

And that is one helluva pretty scene!


A closed mind is like a closed book - nothing can be gained if either remains closed.
Jyrkkä Jätkä
Posted: Wednesday, April 28, 2010 4:28:00 PM

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I just saw in our news they are now selling Finnish birch sap in Paris for 15 euros a bottle as a healthy drink.


In the beginning there was nothing, which exploded.
Raparee
Posted: Wednesday, April 28, 2010 4:33:25 PM

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Jyrkkä Jätkä wrote:
I just saw in our news they are now selling Finnish birch sap in Paris for 15 euros a bottle as a healthy drink.

Somehow, I think noob may endeavor to create his own birch beer now. ;)


A closed mind is like a closed book - nothing can be gained if either remains closed.
nooblet
Posted: Wednesday, April 28, 2010 4:54:56 PM

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I think I might have to. It is extremely difficult to find anyone who sells it outside of New England (at least in the US, in my experience). :(
Jyrkkä Jätkä
Posted: Wednesday, April 28, 2010 5:06:38 PM

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See article in Wiki.


In the beginning there was nothing, which exploded.
entra_dive
Posted: Friday, April 30, 2010 3:15:29 PM
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CLEANSING THE TEETH: how I clean the teeth, with no special tooth paste or powder, just to add clove oil [should be rather stronger] 2 to 3 drops on paste or powder, (salt can also be added) then rub your teeth with brush, then get move the solution in mouth for 2 min. you will feel fresh utter cleans your teeth, you would beware of many disease of teeth and mouth--it is my experience; lets try and let know!
Raparee
Posted: Friday, April 30, 2010 3:20:20 PM

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Clove oil is well known for dental procedures and numbing/painkilling. However, some people really, really hate the taste/scent. I'm rather fond of cloves, but I'm not sure I could handle it in such a potent form. Just like I adore cinnamon, but I hate red hot cinnamon and cinnamon gum as it's just too much.


A closed mind is like a closed book - nothing can be gained if either remains closed.
entra_dive
Posted: Sunday, May 02, 2010 8:31:34 AM
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It also cleanse the teeth efficiently and protects gum infection-bleeding.
foodadd
Posted: Tuesday, August 16, 2016 2:21:40 AM
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Sodium saccharin are used widely in toopaste, it is added little and i think it is safe
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