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Quinoa Options
Daemon
Posted: Saturday, March 7, 2015 12:00:00 AM
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Quinoa

Quinoa is a tall annual herb whose seeds have provided a staple food for peoples of the higher Andes since pre-Columbian times. In the Inca Empire, where only the potato was more widely grown, quinoa is said to have been sacred. The year's first furrows were opened ceremoniously with a gold implement. In the US and other non-Andean nations, quinoa is now a popular alternative to rice and other grains for its higher protein content. What is typically removed from freshly harvested quinoa seeds? More...
Rosa H Vazquez
Posted: Sunday, March 8, 2015 3:33:11 AM
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Bravo! Peruvian Incas you give to all the people in the world excelent food: POTATOES, SWEAT POTATOES, QUINOA, CORN,etc. and many other natural resources. Your Empire was the bigest and richiest in the world; It was destroyed by the ambition of the low, illetary and terrible spaniards. That considered as devil food Quinua, but we know that is one of the best natural resource of the humanity.
frosty rime
Posted: Sunday, March 8, 2015 8:51:27 AM

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It's a very tasty grain.
NeuroticHellFem
Posted: Sunday, March 8, 2015 10:06:56 AM

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Rosa H Vazquez wrote:
Bravo! Peruvian Incas you give to all the people in the world excelent food: POTATOES, SWEAT POTATOES, QUINOA, CORN,etc. and many other natural resources. Your Empire was the bigest and richiest in the world; It was destroyed by the ambition of the low, illetary and terrible spaniards. That considered as devil food Quinua, but we know that is one of the best natural resource of the humanity.


Sweat potatoes? Do they grow in your armpits? Sick
striker
Posted: Sunday, March 8, 2015 10:52:36 AM
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alot of beans, seed, acai etc comings from d. america, eat heatlhy
MelissaMe
Posted: Sunday, March 8, 2015 11:54:01 AM

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This part sounds scary!

"The toxicity category rating of quinoa saponins treats them as mild eye and respiratory irritants and as a low gastrointestinal irritant.[11] The saponin is a toxic glycoside, a main contributor to its hemolytic effects when combined directly with blood cells."

Combined exactly how and where? In the body after consumption? Sick
monamagda
Posted: Sunday, March 8, 2015 1:36:41 PM

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Rise and Fall of the Mother Grain

Following a visit to Colombia, the great Latin American geographer Alexander von Humboldt wrote that quinoa was to ancient Andean societies what "wine was to the Greeks, wheat to the Romans, cotton to the Arabs." Although more prevalent in the neighboring countries of Peru and Bolivia, quinoa has played an important role in indigenous societies throughout the Andean region, including as far south as Salta, Argentina.

The origin of quinoa domestication appears to be located in the area around Lake Titicaca. Based upon the work of Vavilov, the center of origin of a cultivated plant can be determined by the region in which is found the greatest diversity of plant types, both cultivated and wild, related to the plant in question. High variation in cultivated quinoa is found near Lake Titicaca, between Cuzco, Perú and Lake Poopó in Bolivia, thus this is where scientists believe the crop was first domesticated, long before the arrival of the Spanish conquistadors.

The first Spaniard to mention quinoa cultivation in the New World was Pedro de Valdivia, who informed Emperor Carlos I in 1551 of crops located on the around Concepción, Chile. A sixteenth-century khipu shows the importance placed on quinoa production in the central sierra of Perú; quinoa preceded potatoes in the inventory.

Archaeological evidence relating to the consumption of quinoa in ancient Andean societies has been found in a prehistoric tomb in Arica, Chile and among the contents of a mummy's possessions in Ancón, Perú. According to findings in northern Chile, archaeologists believe quinoa was in use prior to 3000 B.C. Further evidence from the Ayacucho area places the domestication of quinoa before 5000 B.C.

There is little doubt that quinoa played a fundamental role in the great Inca civilization. It is believed that the Incas considered quinoa to be a sacred plant: Religious festivals included an offering of quinoa in a fountain of gold to the sun god, Inti; a special gold implement was used to make the first furrow of each year's planting; and, in Cuzco, ancient Incans worshipped entombed quinoa seeds as the progenitors of the city.

Historians have attributed the success of the Incan empire, in part, to its ability to feed not only its own population, but those of conquered tribes as well. Through wise cultivation, storage and distribution of indigenous plants, including quinoa, the Incans were able to sustain their empire.

With the arrival of the Spanish, this was to change. Farmers were sent into the gold mines of Perú and Bolivia, and non-native crops were introduced for Spanish consumption, thus altering centuries of agricultural patterns. During the colonial period, quinoa use was associated strictly with native populations, leading to an undesirable perception of the seed as belonging to the lower class.

By the beginning of this century, quinoa had lost its status as the Mother Grain. Foreign crops, such as barley, had been introduced and surpassed quinoa in importance. Further decline occurred in Peru in the 1940s when the government began to import large amounts of wheat. Between 1941 and 1974, quinoa cultivation plummeted from 111,000 acres to 32,000 acres. Compounded with the growing acculturation of indigenous populations and the stigma of indigenous identification attached to its consumption, quinoa lost its grandeur and became just another subsistence crop for poorer rural families.


http://www.planeta.com/planeta/99/1199quinoa.html
monamagda
Posted: Sunday, March 8, 2015 3:36:27 PM

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