The Free Dictionary  
mailing list For webmasters
Welcome Guest Forum Search | Active Topics | Members

The Great Gatsby Options
Daemon
Posted: Sunday, February 22, 2015 12:00:00 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 3/7/2009
Posts: 29,025
Neurons: 86,253
Location: Inside Farlex computers
The Great Gatsby

Written by F. Scott Fitzgerald, an American novelist of the Jazz Age, The Great Gatsby is today considered standard reading in high school courses on American literature. It tells the story of a bootlegger whose obsessive dream of wealth and lost love is destroyed by a corrupt reality. Cynical yet poignant, the novel is a devastating portrait of the so-called American Dream, which measures success and love in terms of money. What other titles did Fitzgerald consider for this novel? More...
NeuroticHellFem
Posted: Sunday, February 22, 2015 2:05:12 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 7/22/2014
Posts: 2,292
Neurons: 2,582,305
Location: Lilyfield, New South Wales, Australia
Daemon wrote:
... What other titles did Fitzgerald consider for this novel?


Answer:
Quote:
Fitzgerald shifted between Gatsby; Among Ash-Heaps and Millionaires; Trimalchio;[36] Trimalchio in West Egg;[38] On the Road to West Egg;[38] Under the Red, White, and Blue;[36] Gold-Hatted Gatsby;[38][36] and The High-Bouncing Lover.[38][36


I loved the book, the writing was impeccable & inspired. I've never seen this supposedly iconic cover. Seeing it for the first time seems to date the book in a bad way, even though I like the art work. I can't see the book & the cover as being related, but it's many years since I read the book.



When you make an assumption, you make an ass of u & umption! - NeuroticHellFem
monamagda
Posted: Sunday, February 22, 2015 9:40:04 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 2/4/2014
Posts: 7,448
Neurons: 5,592,806
Location: Bogotá, Bogota D.C., Colombia


What The Great Gatsby Was Almost Named

Fitzgerald was never satisfied with The Great Gatsby as the title. The early working title was “Among the Ash Heaps and Millionaires”; other titles that he considered were “Trimalchio in West Egg,” “Trimalchio,” “On the Road to West Egg,” “Gold-hatted Gatsby,” and “The High-bouncing Lover.” The last two come from the epigraph poem by Fitzgerald, which he attributed to Thomas Parke D’Invilliers, a character in This Side of Paradise, his first novel. Trimalchio was the lavish host in The Satyricon, a Latin work by Petronius. On 19 March 1925, three weeks before publication, Fitzgerald cabled Maxwell Perkins: CRAZY ABOUT TITLE UNDER THE RED WHITE AND BLUE STOP WHART WOULD DELAY BE. By then it was too late. And it is too late now to re-title a classic novel.

But I’m just fine with The Great Gatsby. It’s so perfect. One word—“great”—says everything you need to know about the man and the myth of Gatsby the character.

If you read the title with a bit of sarcasm in your voice, I think you’re on to something with regards to how Fitzgerald viewed the “greatness” of his main character in this novel.


http://101books.net/2012/12/04/what-the-great-gatsby-was-almost-named/
striker
Posted: Sunday, February 22, 2015 10:31:50 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 5/30/2014
Posts: 1,698
Neurons: 2,240,255
Location: Roslindale, Massachusetts, United States
i never heard a term jazz age before today
Patrycja Nowakowska Montreal
Posted: Sunday, February 22, 2015 12:13:46 PM

Rank: Newbie

Joined: 2/22/2014
Posts: 17
Neurons: 1,700
Location: Montréal, Quebec, Canada
Best line… favourite quote: "she loves you. her voice is full of it." "no. her voice is full of money"

unfortunate that it was deleted from the film. I suppose today, to term a woman's voice as 'full of money' attains a much different meaning.. one that is derogatory. It is rather saddening. See the deleted scene here:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DgVuhqUBzTg
Milica Boghunovich
Posted: Sunday, February 22, 2015 4:45:01 PM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 8/5/2014
Posts: 1,011
Neurons: 144,425
The Great Gatsby
Written by F. Scott Fitzgerald, an American novelist of the Jazz Age, The Great Gatsby is today considered standard reading in high school courses on American literature. It tells the story of a bootlegger whose obsessive dream of wealth and lost love is destroyed by a corrupt reality. Cynical yet poignant, the novel is a devastating portrait of the so-called American Dream, which measures success and love in terms of money. What other titles did Fitzgerald consider for this novel? More...

Think [color=blue]... victim of the American Dream and his own illusions that money is happiness and success...
Dr WWWW
Posted: Sunday, February 22, 2015 5:15:35 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 4/14/2011
Posts: 264
Neurons: 10,072
Location: Colonie, New York, United States
One of the best endings in literature

And as the moon rose higher the inessential houses began to melt away until gradually I became aware of the old island here that flowered once for Dutch sailors’ eyes — a fresh, green breast of the new world. Its vanished trees, the trees that had made way for Gatsby’s house, had once pandered in whispers to the last and greatest of all human dreams; for a transitory enchanted moment man must have held his breath in the presence of this continent, compelled into an æsthetic contemplation he neither understood nor desired, face to face for the last time in history with something commensurate to his capacity for wonder.

And as I sat there brooding on the old, unknown world, I thought of Gatsby’s wonder when he first picked out the green light at the end of Daisy’s dock. He had come a long way to this blue lawn, and his dream must have seemed so close that he could hardly fail to grasp it. He did not know that it was already behind him, somewhere back in that vast obscurity beyond the city, where the dark fields of the republic rolled on under the night.

Gatsby believed in the green light, the orgastic future that year by year recedes before us. It eluded us then, but that’s no matter — tomorrow we will run faster, stretch out our arms farther…. And one fine morning —

So we beat on, boats against the current, borne back ceaselessly into the past.

Fitzgerald, F. Scott (2003-05-27). The Great Gatsby (p. 185). Simon & Schuster, Inc.

"To read without reflecting is like eating without digesting." -- Edmund Burke
Fredric-frank Myers
Posted: Sunday, February 22, 2015 7:50:00 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 7/26/2014
Posts: 1,405
Neurons: 37,072
Location: Apache Junction, Arizona, United States
Enjoyed this book and the movies in addition enjoying the other writing's by F. Scott.
Celia Harper
Posted: Sunday, February 22, 2015 10:38:09 PM

Rank: Newbie

Joined: 10/15/2014
Posts: 17
Neurons: 1,829,611
Location: Cabin John, Maryland, United States
Last February when we visited Ernest Hemingway Key West home, I bought a copy of "the restored version" of "A Moveable Feast." It has amazing passages related to F. Scott Fitzgerald and Zelda and the writing of "Great Gabsy." It's well worth reading. One iconic figure writing about another another. They lived in a very diferent world and their writing brings it to us.
NeuroticHellFem
Posted: Monday, February 23, 2015 2:08:35 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 7/22/2014
Posts: 2,292
Neurons: 2,582,305
Location: Lilyfield, New South Wales, Australia
Patrycja Nowakowska Montreal wrote:
Best line… favourite quote: "she loves you. her voice is full of it." "no. her voice is full of money"

unfortunate that it was deleted from the film. I suppose today, to term a woman's voice as 'full of money' attains a much different meaning.. one that is derogatory. It is rather saddening. See the deleted scene here:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DgVuhqUBzTg


It's a good one, but for my all time favourite from the book, I'm with Dr WWWW.

Quote:
So we beat on, boats against the current, borne back ceaselessly into the past.


When you make an assumption, you make an ass of u & umption! - NeuroticHellFem
Users browsing this topic
Guest


Forum Jump
You cannot post new topics in this forum.
You cannot reply to topics in this forum.
You cannot delete your posts in this forum.
You cannot edit your posts in this forum.
You cannot create polls in this forum.
You cannot vote in polls in this forum.

Main Forum RSS : RSS
Forum Terms and Guidelines | Privacy policy | Copyright © 2008-2019 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.