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There is nothing so dangerous for anyone who has something to hide as conversation! A human being, Hastings, cannot resist... Options
Daemon
Posted: Friday, February 20, 2015 12:00:00 AM
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There is nothing so dangerous for anyone who has something to hide as conversation! A human being, Hastings, cannot resist the opportunity to reveal himself and express his personality which conversation gives him. Every time he will give himself away.

Agatha Christie (1890-1976)
Milica Boghunovich
Posted: Friday, February 20, 2015 1:13:37 AM
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There is nothing so dangerous for anyone who has something to hide as conversation! A human being, Hastings, cannot resist the opportunity to reveal himself and express his personality which conversation gives him. Every time he will give himself away.
Agatha Christie (1890-1976)

Applause
KSPavan
Posted: Friday, February 20, 2015 2:45:19 AM

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Dogs are wise. They crawl away into a quiet corner and lick their wounds and do not rejoin the world until they are whole once more.
Agatha Christie

Read more at http://www.brainyquote.com/quotes/authors/a/agatha_christie.html#7D4H8g0QBKWt7X43.99
Bully_rus
Posted: Friday, February 20, 2015 3:31:52 AM
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That's why it's better to be silent when returning late at night... How do you do, darling?
Sri Harsha
Posted: Friday, February 20, 2015 6:26:58 AM

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Absolutely true!!!!In particular when we converse with our well wishers we share entire our personality.
Omar Mariani
Posted: Friday, February 20, 2015 8:00:47 AM

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Slaves to one's words, masters of our silences
pedro
Posted: Friday, February 20, 2015 8:40:15 AM

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" A human being, Hastings, cannot resist the opportunity to reveal himself and express his personality which conversation gives him. Every time he will give himself away."


Hastings isn't a human being. It's a town. I should know. I was born there.

All good ideas arrive by chance- Max Ernst
monamagda
Posted: Friday, February 20, 2015 9:04:53 AM

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The context from "The A.B.C. Murders" (The book features the characters of Hercule Poirot, Arthur Hastings and Chief Inspector Japp)
The quote is at the end of Chapter 31, Poirot talking......


‘How have I inspired you this time?’ I asked.
‘While I was asking myself certain questions I remembered a remark of yours—a remark
absolutely shimmering in its clear vision. Did I not say to you once that you had a genius
for stating the obvious. It is the obvious that I have neglected.’
‘What is this brilliant remark of mine?’ I asked.
‘It makes everything as clear as crystal. I see the answers to all my questions. The reason
for Mrs Ascher (that, it is true, I glimpsed long ago), the reason for Sir Carmichael Clarke,
the reason for the Doncaster murder, and finally and supremely important,the reason for
Hercule Poirot .’
‘Could you kindly explain?’ I asked.
‘Not at the moment. I require first a little more information. That I can get from our Special Legion. And then—then,when I have got the answer to a certain question, I will go and see ABC . We will be face to face at last—A B C and Hercule Poirot—the adversaries.’
‘And then?’ I asked.
‘And then,’ said Poirot. ‘We will talk!Je vous assure, Hastings —there is nothing so dangerous for anyone who has something to hide as conversation! Speech, so a wise old Frenchman said to me once, is an invention of man’s to prevent him from thinking. It is
also an infallible means of discovering that which he wishes to hide. A human being, Hastings, cannot resist the opportunity to reveal himself and express his personality which conversation gives him. Every time he will give himself away.’

‘What do you expect Cust to tell you?’
Hercule Poirot smiled.
‘A lie,’ he said. ‘And by it, I shall know the truth!’

Read the novel, it's really worthy!! : http://www.bzelbublive.info/www.almosteverythingbooks.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/03/12-The-ABC-Murders1.pdf
pedro
Posted: Friday, February 20, 2015 9:21:11 AM

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I'm not sure Hastings would take a 'Je vous assure' after what happened in 1066, even from a Belgian.

All good ideas arrive by chance- Max Ernst
Wanderer
Posted: Friday, February 20, 2015 9:41:15 AM

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Silence is golden. Nothing I hate more than conservations of the nature of an inquest.
rd387
Posted: Friday, February 20, 2015 9:44:58 AM

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I have nothing to hide but at the same time i am not talkative. How many times do i need to express my personality and to how many people do i need to reveal myself in order to measure up to the real standard of being 'a human being?'
striker
Posted: Friday, February 20, 2015 10:14:51 AM
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avoid putting yourself in those situations
Dr WWWW
Posted: Friday, February 20, 2015 12:09:29 PM

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Proverbs 17:28
Quote:
"Even a fool, if he will hold his peace shall be counted wise: and if he close his lips, a man of understanding."

or:

Abraham Lincoln or Mark Twain or (likely) both:
Quote:
"Better to remain silent and be thought a fool than to speak out and remove all doubt."


"To read without reflecting is like eating without digesting." -- Edmund Burke
Fredric-frank Myers
Posted: Friday, February 20, 2015 1:23:20 PM

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Thank you ever so much Dame Agatha, for your scripts, t'ws always enjoyable and exciting to read and watch your productions................
Damascus
Posted: Friday, February 20, 2015 1:25:49 PM

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I wondered what meaning of Hastings , but I have already got it !
Thanks monamagda for answering and thanks Pedro for your question ..
io4yiu
Posted: Friday, February 20, 2015 2:58:26 PM

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Yes, but this might progressively lead to individual Mutism ...

:S
thar
Posted: Friday, February 20, 2015 3:22:45 PM

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Of course this story is very dated an old-fashioned now. It could never happen today.

The idea of planning murders and expecting to arrive there on time by train? Ludicrous plot line: There would be signalling problems, overrunning engineering work, cancellations and a replacement bus serviceWhistle
Corner of Josh
Posted: Friday, February 20, 2015 3:37:15 PM
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Watching Poirot, I realized that Hastings only existed so that Poirot can show off...

The world loves talent but pays off on character. (John Gardner, 1982)
Dr WWWW
Posted: Friday, February 20, 2015 8:47:27 PM

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Hercule Poirot and Miss Marple from Wikipedia

Christie's first book The Mysterious Affair at Styles was published in 1920 and introduced the detective Hercule Poirot, who became a long-running character in many of Christie's works, appearing in 33 novels and 54 short stories.

Miss (Jane) Marple was introduced in the short stories The Thirteen Problems in 1927 and was based on Christie's grandmother and her "Ealing cronies". Both Jane and Gran "always expected the worst of everyone and everything, and were, with almost frightening accuracy, usually proved right." Marple appeared in 12 of Christie's novels. During the Second World War, Christie wrote two novels, Curtain and Sleeping Murder, intended as the last cases of these two great detectives, Hercule Poirot and Jane Marple. Both books were sealed in a bank vault for over thirty years and were released for publication by Christie only at the end of her life, when she realised that she could not write any more novels. These publications came on the heels of the success of the film version of Murder on the Orient Express in 1974.

Like Sir Arthur Conan Doyle with his character Sherlock Holmes, Christie was to become increasingly tired of her detective Poirot. By the end of the 1930s, Christie wrote in her diary that she was finding Poirot "insufferable," and by the 1960s she felt that he was "an egocentric creep." However, unlike Conan Doyle, Christie resisted the temptation to kill her detective off while he was still popular. She saw herself as an entertainer whose job was to produce what the public liked, and the public liked Poirot. Feeling tied down, stuck with a love interest, she did marry off Poirot's companion, Colonel Hastings, in an attempt to trim her cast commitments. In contrast, Christie was fond of Miss Marple. However, the Belgian detective's titles outnumber the Marple titles more than two to one. This is largely because Christie wrote numerous Poirot novels early in her career, while The Murder at the Vicarage remained the sole Marple novel until the 1940s. Christie never wrote a novel or short story featuring both Poirot and Miss Marple. In a recording discovered and released in 2008, Christie revealed the reason for this: "Hercule Poirot, a complete egoist, would not like being taught his business or having suggestions made to him by an elderly spinster lady".

Poirot is the only fictional character to have been given an obituary in The New York Times, following the publication of Curtain. It appeared on the front page of the paper on 6 August 1975.

Following the great success of Curtain, Christie gave permission for the release of Sleeping Murder sometime in 1976 but died in January 1976 before the book could be released. This may explain some of the inconsistencies compared to the rest of the Marple series — for example, Colonel Arthur Bantry, husband of Miss Marple's friend Dolly, is still alive and well in Sleeping Murder despite the fact he is noted as having died in books published earlier. It may be that Christie simply did not have time to revise the manuscript before she died. No other detective, including Miss Marple despite Marple's superannuation, was killed off by Christie.


"To read without reflecting is like eating without digesting." -- Edmund Burke
rd387
Posted: Friday, February 20, 2015 9:53:59 PM

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“Never argue with a fool, onlookers may not be able to tell the difference.”- Mark Twain.


Better to be a 'silent fool ' with wise deeds than be a wise conversationalist with no deeds


sandeep patra
Posted: Saturday, February 21, 2015 12:19:02 AM

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Communicating truth is such a relief but hard
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