The Free Dictionary  
mailing list For webmasters
Welcome Guest Forum Search | Active Topics | Members

Magna Carta Copy Found in Scrapbook Options
Daemon
Posted: Tuesday, February 10, 2015 5:00:00 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 3/7/2009
Posts: 29,590
Neurons: 87,948
Location: Inside Farlex computers
Magna Carta Copy Found in Scrapbook

A previously unknown version of the Magna Carta—the most famous document in British constitutional history—has been found tucked in a scrapbook by an archivist in the British town of Sandwich. The discovery comes just days after four surviving copies of the 1215 Magna Carta went on display in London. The Magna Carta, issued in 1215 by King John of England, asserted that no one, not even the king, was above the law. The newly found version appears to have been published under King Edward I in 1300. More...
thar
Posted: Tuesday, February 10, 2015 2:57:43 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 7/8/2010
Posts: 21,107
Neurons: 85,341
Saying it was issued by King John is a bit vague. He signed it because he was forced to. And promptly ignored it.
ChristopherJohnson
Posted: Tuesday, February 10, 2015 3:28:06 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 3/27/2014
Posts: 2,447
Neurons: 1,810,851
Location: Tbilisi, T'bilisi, Georgia
Interesting, which copy provides for greater democracy?
thar
Posted: Tuesday, February 10, 2015 4:59:00 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 7/8/2010
Posts: 21,107
Neurons: 85,341
Apparently about forty copies were made, to be sent around the country and read aloud. It is not the sort of thing that gets thrown away, except by mistake by an overzealous clerk clearing out the old rubbish documents. A lot may have fallen apart and disintegrated, but I wouldn't be surprised if there were a few more around.
striker
Posted: Tuesday, February 10, 2015 11:07:46 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 5/30/2014
Posts: 1,698
Neurons: 2,240,255
Location: Roslindale, Massachusetts, United States
what a find
NeuroticHellFem
Posted: Tuesday, February 10, 2015 1:46:14 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 7/22/2014
Posts: 2,292
Neurons: 2,589,153
Location: Lilyfield, New South Wales, Australia
Previously, the weirdest thing I've ever found in a sandwich was cabbage. Mum had no lettuce & thought none of us would notice. Sick
Dr WWWW
Posted: Tuesday, February 10, 2015 8:30:30 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 4/14/2011
Posts: 264
Neurons: 10,072
Location: Colonie, New York, United States

The document conceded by John and set with his seal in 1215, however, was not what we know today as Magna Carta but rather a set of baronial stipulations, now lost, known as the "Articles of the barons." After John and his barons agreed on the final provisions and additional wording changes, they issued a formal version on June 19, and it is this document that came to be known as Magna Carta. Of great significance to future generations was a minor wording change, the replacement of the term "any baron" with "any freeman" in stipulating to whom the provisions applied. Over time, it would help justify the application of the Charter's provisions to a greater part of the population. While freemen were a minority in 13th-century England, the term would eventually include all English, just as "We the People" would come to apply to all Americans in this century.

While Magna Carta would one day become a basic document of the British Constitution, democracy and universal protection of ancient liberties were not among the barons' goals. The Charter was a feudal document and meant to protect the rights and property of the few powerful families that topped the rigidly structured feudal system. In fact, the majority of the population, the thousands of unfree laborers, are only mentioned once, in a clause concerning the use of court-set fines to punish minor offenses. Magna Carta's primary purpose was restorative: to force King John to recognize the supremacy of ancient liberties, to limit his ability to raise funds, and to reassert the principle of "due process." Only a final clause, which created an enforcement council of tenants-in-chief and clergymen, would have severely limited the king's power and introduced something new to English law: the principle of "majority rule." But majority rule was an idea whose time had not yet come; in September, at John's urging, Pope Innocent II annulled the "shameful and demeaning agreement, forced upon the king by violence and fear." The civil war that followed ended only with John's death in October 1216.

From: U.S. National Archives
Users browsing this topic
Guest


Forum Jump
You cannot post new topics in this forum.
You cannot reply to topics in this forum.
You cannot delete your posts in this forum.
You cannot edit your posts in this forum.
You cannot create polls in this forum.
You cannot vote in polls in this forum.