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Juturnalia Options
Daemon
Posted: Sunday, January 11, 2015 12:00:00 AM
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Juturnalia

According to Virgil, Juturna is the sister of Turnus, king of the Rutuli. In return for her virginity, Jupiter gave her immortality. Afterward, she was turned into a fountain of the same name near the Numicus, the river where Aeneas' dead body was found. The waters from this fountain were used in sacrifices, particularly those in honor of the Roman goddess Vesta, and were believed to have curative powers. On January 11, a festival in honor of Juturna was observed by men working on aqueducts and wells. She was also celebrated at the Vulcanalia on August 23 as a protectress against fire. More...
NeuroticHellFem
Posted: Sunday, January 11, 2015 8:24:27 AM

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Daemon wrote:
Juturnalia

According to Virgil, Juturna is the sister of Turnus, king of the Rutuli. In return for her virginity, Jupiter gave her immortality. Afterward, she was turned into a fountain of the same name near the Numicus, the river where Aeneas' dead body was found. The waters from this fountain were used in sacrifices, particularly those in honor of the Roman goddess Vesta, and were believed to have curative powers. On January 11, a festival in honor of Juturna was observed by men working on aqueducts and wells. She was also celebrated at the Vulcanalia on August 23 as a protectress against fire. More...

She got screwed on that deal! (pun intented) What's the point of immortality if you're a fountain?

When you make an assumption, you make an ass of u & umption! - NeuroticHellFem
monamagda
Posted: Sunday, January 11, 2015 10:32:57 AM

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The myth of Juturna according to Virgil:

A. Virgil
Book XII of the Aeneid recounts the final confrontation between the peoples of Latium (=Latini) and the Trojans (=Dardanides) freshly arrived in Italy. Turnus, nephew of King Latinus of Lavinium, a town south of Rome, refuses to sign a peace treaty with the Trojans and demands singular combat against Aeneas. The gods and goddesses get very much involved in the conflict, with Venus siding with her son Aeneas, Juno siding with the Latini. The outcome, however, has long been foretold by the Fates : a stranger from afar shall marry Lavinia, daughter of Latinus, and succeed him as king.

turnus Though Turnus and his lineage get abundant coverage in Book VII, only now, in this final chapter, does the poet introduce us to Juturna, the prince’s sister. Virgil focuses on her participation in the conflict. Her past history receives only passing mention, during monolgues and dialogues. Thus our first glimpse of Juturna is in the heavens. Juno expresses some fondness for her (!) despite the fact that she had attracted Jupiter’s lustful attentions. The goddess invites her to descend to earth where a peace treaty is about to be signed by Latinus and Aeneas. Remaining invisible or else disguising herself as a mortal, Juturna provokes a revolt in the Latin camp. War is declared. At first, Turnus and his band gain the upper hand ; Aeneas is wounded and carried off. Venus now intervenes, heals and arms Aeneas who succeeds in pushing back the foe. He orders the burning of Lavinium. His sister’s pleas notwithstanding, Turnus rushes back to the city to meet his destiny. Jupiter and Juno agree to let the Fates have their way. Jupiter sends one of the Furies to put a stop to Juturna’s interference. In despair, the nymph covers her head with her cloak and plunges into a stream. The poem ends with Aeneas killing Turnus in a frenzy, a savage cry of vengeance for the death of his friend Pallas on his lips.

As Juturna prepares to abandon the fight on Jupiter’s order, we learn from her monologue that Jupiter had made her immortal in compensation for her loss of virginity when he raped her. She regrets her condition bitterly, for she would prefer death with her brother Turnus to livng forever wthout him.

“Why did [Jupiter] give me eternal life ? At least I could have ended so much pain, and accompany my unhappy brother to Hades. Me, immortal ? What sweetness can such privilege have without you, my brother !”

http://www.ancientworlds.net/aw/Article/1111854
striker
Posted: Sunday, January 11, 2015 10:39:03 AM
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in ancient time thoughs aqueducts were invaluable
Fredric-frank Myers
Posted: Sunday, January 11, 2015 10:28:21 PM

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As always, good read, thanks again..........
JUSTIN Excellence
Posted: Monday, January 12, 2015 2:57:13 AM

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Location: Veinau, Baden-Wuerttemberg Region, Germany
monamagda wrote:
The myth of Juturna according to Virgil:

A. Virgil
Book XII of the Aeneid recounts the final confrontation between the peoples of Latium (=Latini) and the Trojans (=Dardanides) freshly arrived in Italy. Turnus, nephew of King Latinus of Lavinium, a town south of Rome, refuses to sign a peace treaty with the Trojans and demands singular combat against Aeneas. The gods and goddesses get very much involved in the conflict, with Venus siding with her son Aeneas, Juno siding with the Latini. The outcome, however, has long been foretold by the Fates : a stranger from afar shall marry Lavinia, daughter of Latinus, and succeed him as king.

turnus Though Turnus and his lineage get abundant coverage in Book VII, only now, in this final chapter, does the poet introduce us to Juturna, the prince’s sister. Virgil focuses on her participation in the conflict. Her past history receives only passing mention, during monolgues and dialogues. Thus our first glimpse of Juturna is in the heavens. Juno expresses some fondness for her (!) despite the fact that she had attracted Jupiter’s lustful attentions. The goddess invites her to descend to earth where a peace treaty is about to be signed by Latinus and Aeneas. Remaining invisible or else disguising herself as a mortal, Juturna provokes a revolt in the Latin camp. War is declared. At first, Turnus and his band gain the upper hand ; Aeneas is wounded and carried off. Venus now intervenes, heals and arms Aeneas who succeeds in pushing back the foe. He orders the burning of Lavinium. His sister’s pleas notwithstanding, Turnus rushes back to the city to meet his destiny. Jupiter and Juno agree to let the Fates have their way. Jupiter sends one of the Furies to put a stop to Juturna’s interference. In despair, the nymph covers her head with her cloak and plunges into a stream. The poem ends with Aeneas killing Turnus in a frenzy, a savage cry of vengeance for the death of his friend Pallas on his lips.

As Juturna prepares to abandon the fight on Jupiter’s order, we learn from her monologue that Jupiter had made her immortal in compensation for her loss of virginity when he raped her. She regrets her condition bitterly, for she would prefer death with her brother Turnus to livng forever wthout him.

“Why did [Jupiter] give me eternal life ? At least I could have ended so much pain, and accompany my unhappy brother to Hades. Me, immortal ? What sweetness can such privilege have without you, my brother !”

http://www.ancientworlds.net/aw/Article/1111854


Thank you Mona


über laboratorium dauernd zur Naturtreue
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