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Inflectional affixes in Danish Options
Quay
Posted: Monday, January 5, 2015 8:46:13 AM

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In English all inflectional affixes are suffixes. Is this true in Danish also? I think that in most if not all Germanic languages inflectional affixes are suffixes. Does anyone know?
Bit
Posted: Tuesday, April 14, 2015 8:11:31 AM

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Location: Viborg, Central Jutland, Denmark
Can you give an example?
Michal, from Poland
Posted: Sunday, April 19, 2015 7:35:01 AM
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I am not ceratin if there is no exception, but many inflectional affixes in Danish are suffixes, as 'by' - 'byer' (town - towns). Could you write if suffix modifying the base as in the example of 'artikel' - 'artikler' (article-articles) is also a normal suffix or suffix with inflix or other type of affix? I am not native speaker in Danish or linguist. Greetings! Michal
Quay
Posted: Sunday, April 19, 2015 9:54:14 AM

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Bit. Some examples in English is dog to dogs is made plural by adding the suffix s. simple past tense is walk to walked made by adding the suffix ed.
Michal, from Poland
Posted: Sunday, April 19, 2015 12:10:59 PM
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Yes, but does it suit you that in many cases base is changed as in the example 'artikel' - 'artikler' (article-articles), with 'e' before 'l' omitted? I can give you more examples, but expand your question, please.
Bit
Posted: Monday, April 27, 2015 3:55:03 PM

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Location: Viborg, Central Jutland, Denmark
I am not a teacher, only a Dane, so it is a bit difficult for me to answer this question.

As for the example, though: "dog - dogs" would be "hund - hunde", adding the "e" for plural.

But your example "walk - walked", is in Danish as in English: "walk - went" / "gå - gik" (irregular).

If it was "learn - learned", it would be "lære - lærte". "Teach - teached" = "undervise - underviste".

Please don't hesitate to ask again, I would love to help (if I can). I suppose that Danish is a bit hopeless to learn...
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