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Reading maketh a full man; conference a ready man; and writing an exact man. Options
Daemon
Posted: Friday, December 19, 2014 12:00:00 AM
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Reading maketh a full man; conference a ready man; and writing an exact man.

Francis Bacon (1561-1626)
Ozolinsh V.
Posted: Friday, December 19, 2014 1:29:04 AM

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And practice makes man a man.
sandeep patra
Posted: Friday, December 19, 2014 2:07:08 AM

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Different phases of learning aptly explainedApplause
Vit Babenco
Posted: Friday, December 19, 2014 2:40:59 AM

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Yes, if man is already a man...
Madas
Posted: Friday, December 19, 2014 2:44:25 AM

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What about the digerati? Can we call such a man a perfect man?
Bully_rus
Posted: Friday, December 19, 2014 3:23:24 AM
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Reading that put in a perspective... Conference may be considered as a primitive form of democracy or one of its tools.
monamagda
Posted: Friday, December 19, 2014 10:01:55 AM

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The quotation comes from Francis Bacon's essay "Of Studies," from "The Essayes or Counsels Civill & Moral of Francis Bacon."

Of Studies

STUDIES serve for delight, for ornament, and for ability. Their chief use for delight, is in privateness and retiring; for ornament, is in discourse; and for ability, is in the judgment, and disposition of business. For expert men can execute, and perhaps judge of particulars, one by one; but the general counsels, and the plots and marshalling of affairs, come best, from those that are learned. To spend too much time in studies is sloth; to use them too much for ornament, is affectation; to make judgment wholly by their rules, is the humor of a scholar. They perfect nature, and are perfected by experience: for natural abilities are like natural plants, that need proyning, by study; and studies themselves, do give forth directions too much at large, except they be bounded in by experience. Crafty men contemn studies, simple men admire them, and wise men use them; for they teach not their own use; but that is a wisdom without them, and above them, won by observation. Read not to contradict and confute; nor to believe and take for granted; nor to find talk and discourse; but to weigh and consider. Some books are to be tasted, others to be swallowed, and some few to be chewed and digested; that is, some books are to be read only in parts; others to be read, but not curiously; and some few to be read wholly, and with diligence and attention. Some books also may be read by deputy, and extracts made of them by others; but that would be only in the less important arguments, and the meaner sort of books, else distilled books are like common distilled waters, flashy things. Reading maketh a full man; conference a ready man; and writing an exact man. And therefore, if a man write little, he had need have a great memory; if he confer little, he had need have a present wit: and if he read little, he had need have much cunning, to seem to know, that he doth not. Histories make men wise; poets witty; the mathematics subtile; natural philosophy deep; moral grave; logic and rhetoric able to contend. Abeunt studia in mores. Nay, there is no stond or impediment in the wit, but may be wrought out by fit studies; like as diseases of the body, may have appropriate exercises. Bowling is good for the stone and reins; shooting for the lungs and breast; gentle walking for the stomach; riding for the head; and the like. So if a man's wit be wandering, let him study the mathematics; for in demonstrations, if his wit be called away never so little, he must begin again. If his wit be not apt to distinguish or find differences, let him study the Schoolmen; for they are cymini sectores. If he be not apt to beat over matters, and to call up one thing to prove and illustrate another, let him study the lawyers' cases. So every defect of the mind, may have a special receipt.

Read the essays:http://www.gutenberg.org/files/575/575-h/575-h.htm#link2H_4_0050
monamagda
Posted: Friday, December 19, 2014 10:04:11 AM

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Comment:

When Bacon says that "writing makes an exact man," he follows that immediately by the warning, "if a Man write little, he hath need of a good memory." Bacon, who wrote hundreds of pages, in a style that we now call the "plain style," understood that writing--and this is an aspect we recognize today--helps a person remember complex matters because writing tends to imprint on the mind what a person writes. More important, however, is that Bacon was aware that writing, because writing must be precise to be understood, also forces the writer to think clearly about the subject. An axiom (a universally understood truth) of writing, encapsulated in Bacon's comment about writing and exactness, is that if a person cannot write clearly about a subject, he cannot think clearly about that subject--and that is why Bacon links writing with being exact or precise.


By Stephen Holliday

http://www.enotes.com/homework-help/what-does-writing-makes-an-exct-man-mean-465204
striker
Posted: Friday, December 19, 2014 12:11:38 PM
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society is to busy texting
Antram
Posted: Friday, December 19, 2014 2:46:48 PM
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In the article, Bacon bases our Mind's knowledge, on reading's studies,learning,experience and understanding, as expressed through reason's clarity through writing,~ but he seems to omit our mind's capacity of perceiving, through Higher Sensory Perception, which includes meditation and intellectual contemplation's means of insights and revelations,which fosters our intelligence regarding the question we've posed.
Fredric-frank Myers
Posted: Friday, December 19, 2014 3:33:16 PM

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Thanks for this bit of, "Un-fried bacon".... Tw's a treat to eat I must say.
Joy Frohlich
Posted: Friday, December 19, 2014 5:38:27 PM
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I remember learning this at school but I had forgotten who said it first. Also, the man who never made a mistake never made anything.
Dr WWWW
Posted: Friday, December 19, 2014 11:25:39 PM

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Thank you Monamagda for your post. I've been following this forum for several years and have always appreciated your diligence in digging up the source of the quote and, as in this case, a good explication.
Verbatim
Posted: Monday, December 22, 2014 3:38:07 PM
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Daemon wrote:
Reading maketh a full man; conference a ready man; and writing an exact man.

Francis Bacon (1561-1626)


Therefore, a full man reads intent on understanding, a ready man confers by listening before speaking, and the exact man thinks through before writing.
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