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Norbert Wiener (1894) Options
Daemon
Posted: Wednesday, November 26, 2014 12:00:00 AM
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Norbert Wiener (1894)

A child prodigy, Wiener graduated college at age 14 and earned his PhD at 18. Several years later, he joined the faculty of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, where he became a professor of mathematics. He made significant contributions to a number of areas in the field, but he is best known for his theory of cybernetics—the comparative study of control and communication in humans and machines. In an article titled "A Scientist Rebels," Wiener urged his fellow scientists to do what? More...
LucOneOff
Posted: Wednesday, November 26, 2014 2:49:56 AM

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His article "A Scientist Rebels" for the January 1947 issue of The Atlantic Monthly urged scientists to consider the ethical implications of their work. After the war, he refused to accept any government funding or to work on military projects.
monamagda
Posted: Wednesday, November 26, 2014 10:24:50 AM

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HAPPY US FOR YOUR BIRTHDAY Mr.WIENER!!

In his younger years, he was (by his own account) a barely-ambulatory bundle of neuroses, and insufferable; he improved with age, to the point of being merely vain and arrogant. In all fairness, he had a lot to be arrogant about: in addition to his mathematics, he was one of the founders of cybernetics, and the man who coined the word (from the Greek kubernetes, steersman, whence also "governor"). He defined it as "the science of control and communication in the animal and the machine," and thought it was basically about information theory and feedback, and how animals and machines manage to do things; and he warned, as explicitly as possible, against using it for handwaving fluff in social science or philosophy. (These warnings were, naturally, ignored; but that is also another story.) He realized, of course, that understanding that would lead to better automatic machinery, with profound but unpredictable consequences, and he wrote a lot to try and make people think about them. (They didn't, but that's yet another story.) He was less than entirely successful as a prophet — for instance, automation has not yet resulted in mass unemployment — but nobody is or was, and his heart at least was in the right place.

http://vserver1.cscs.lsa.umich.edu/~crshalizi/notabene/wiener.html
striker
Posted: Wednesday, November 26, 2014 11:54:25 AM
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a beautiful mind
Milica Boghunovich
Posted: Wednesday, November 26, 2014 5:53:56 PM
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Norbert Wiener (1894)

A child prodigy, Wiener graduated college at age 14 and earned his PhD at 18. Several years later, he joined the faculty of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, where he became a professor of mathematics. He made significant contributions to a number of areas in the field, but he is best known for his theory of cybernetics—the comparative study of control and communication in humans and machines. In an article titled "A Scientist Rebels," Wiener urged his fellow scientists to do what? More...

Applause What a dynamic character transformed from a military person into a staunch pacifist! How admirable, courageous, and awesome Norbert Wiener is to refuse to do any projects for the military! Many scientists have realized how dangerous science is in the hands of the military, but blind, gruesome intellects like Neumann are unconcerned for the world. Great mathematical minds Albert Einstein and Bertrand Russell have been the leaders in total demilitarization and world pacifism.
Fredric-frank Myers
Posted: Wednesday, November 26, 2014 8:05:50 PM

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Great read and gave me some interesting "FLASHBACKS" to my early classes in undergraduate studies. As always, thanks.
Barnacle Barney Bill
Posted: Wednesday, November 26, 2014 10:58:15 PM

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Bite the hand that feeds you. A credo to feel good by.
excaelis
Posted: Thursday, November 27, 2014 2:08:02 AM

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Great man, deplorable name. I'm amazed he made it through kindergarten.

Sanity is not statistical
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