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The Monarch Butterfly Options
Daemon
Posted: Thursday, November 20, 2014 12:00:00 AM
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The Monarch Butterfly

The monarch, with its distinctive orange and black pattern, is considered one the world's most beautiful butterflies. In North America, thousands of monarchs gather in autumn and migrate southward, sometimes more than 1,800 miles (2,900 km), and return north in spring. Their ability to return to the same spots over several generations has led scientists to research how circadian rhythm and the position of the sun are involved. What is aposematism, and how do monarch butterflies exemplify it? More...
L.Rai
Posted: Thursday, November 20, 2014 12:24:03 AM

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Today's answer:

Monarchs are foul-tasting and poisonous due to the presence of cardenolide aglycones in their bodies, which the caterpillars ingest as they feed on milkweed.[37] Both forms advertise their unpalatability with bright colors and areas of high contrast on the skin or wings in a phenomenon known as aposematism.

They use their coloring to warn off predators.

_________

Where I used to live in CA we had the largest collection of migrating Monarchs in the State. Practically next to the Pacific Ocean we had a large stand of eucalyptus trees (non-native to CA) and the Monarchs like to congregate in huge colonies from around October until February. It's an amazing site to see thousands of them dripping off the trees and then when the sun comes out they all take flight. If you are even on the Central Coast of CA during that time of year be sure to stop at the butterfly grove.


"Your life matters more than you will ever know, so live it well"
srilalitha p
Posted: Thursday, November 20, 2014 1:23:29 AM

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Warning colouration.
excaelis
Posted: Thursday, November 20, 2014 1:51:07 AM

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I must say it's never occurred to me try eating one, and I'm certainly on the wagon now ( as far as lepidoptera are concerned, anyway ). Although, I can't help wondering if Cabbage Whites might be okay...Think

Sanity is not statistical
Vit Babenco
Posted: Thursday, November 20, 2014 2:13:55 AM

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Butterflies are most exotic creatures on earth.
Tim0101
Posted: Thursday, November 20, 2014 8:07:37 AM

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But they taste soooooo good. Liar
NeuroticHellFem
Posted: Thursday, November 20, 2014 8:50:34 AM

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Monarchs live from around 2-8 weeks, & when copulation occurs, the male & female remain attached for about 30 to 60 minutes!
Humans live around 80 years & when copulation occurs, it's not always that long. Think
I need a man who's got the stamina of a butterfly.


When you make an assumption, you make an ass of u & umption! - NeuroticHellFem
striker
Posted: Thursday, November 20, 2014 8:51:16 AM
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a caterpillar to a butterfly amazes me
Alice M Toaster
Posted: Thursday, November 20, 2014 10:11:20 AM

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I'm with you, NHF!

Just trying to figure out the difference between
Gary98
Posted: Thursday, November 20, 2014 10:57:05 AM

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Alice Morgan wrote:
I'm with you, NHF!


As exemplified by these butterfly, both have to work at it, and it is not that uncommon! Tricky part is to find your match.
monamagda
Posted: Thursday, November 20, 2014 12:16:42 PM

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Monarch Butterfly (Danaus plexippus)

Its scientific name comes strait out of mythology. In short, Danaus was a king and had 50 daughters, while his brother, Aegyptus, had 50 sons. Aegyptus wanted the 50 sons to marry the 50 daughters but Danaus refuses until he gets forced into organizing a mass wedding. He then has his daughters kill their husbands, and all but one does. The remaining son gets revenge on Danaus, and he and the daughter become king and queen to a dynasty. See where all this royalty stuff comes from? (Oh, and the species name, plexippus, comes from a name of one of the sons)

Some say that this butterfly was named in honor of King William III of England, who claimed the throne following a growing threat of a revival of Catholicism at the hand of King James II. A devout Protestant, he quickly gained public support and later won the English, Scottish, and Irish crowns following the Glorious Revolution of 1688. King William III to this day is more commonly known as William of Orange, which seems to make "Monarch" a rather fitting name for one of the most popular of the butterfly species.

It may have been given it’s name because of it’s regal appearance.


http://animaladay.blogspot.com.br/2010/05/monarch-butterfly.html
Fredric-frank Myers
Posted: Thursday, November 20, 2014 3:51:36 PM

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There is a real problem for these beautiful creatures, pesticides.
Barnacle Barney Bill
Posted: Thursday, November 20, 2014 5:30:19 PM

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Amusing comment, excaelis. But I think you on to something. Insects are good for you. All protein and hardly any fat.
I have never seen a fat butterfly. Anyway, the UN is promoting the raising insects for human consumption. I don't think that I am ready to try some though.
L.Rai
Posted: Thursday, November 20, 2014 8:16:11 PM

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Barnacle Barney Bill wrote:
Amusing comment, excaelis. But I think you on to something. Insects are good for you. All protein and hardly any fat.
I have never seen a fat butterfly. Anyway, the UN is promoting the raising insects for human consumption. I don't think that I am ready to try some though.


Dear BBB:

Come to southern China and you can experiment with many varieties of edible insects. They even have cockroaches on some menus...yuk. Where I live in the northeast they eat silk worm larvae. You can see them in the market and they are moving about so you know they are fresh. I'm told they are tasty but to be honest I can't get past the look of them to try them. Like the cockroaches the idea of eating them is just revolting.

So, if it comes down to a new food source for the world, I'd vote against bugs, however maybe on a stick with plenty of BBQ sauce I could be persuaded to at least try them. Sick

"Your life matters more than you will ever know, so live it well"
L.Rai
Posted: Thursday, November 20, 2014 8:18:39 PM

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Dear NHF:

You are so funny... Applause I invite you to come someday to Pismo Beach and see them up close. When they are mating it's interesting because they will fly for a short time coupled and then they float back to earth and stay coupled for a long time. The danger is very young children think it's fun to step on them. I'll let your imagination run with that image. Think

"Your life matters more than you will ever know, so live it well"
early_apex
Posted: Thursday, November 20, 2014 8:45:57 PM

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LRai said: "Like the cockroaches the idea of eating them is just revolting."

That reminds me of a movie quote: "The gag reflex -- once you learn to suppress it, it opens up a whole world of culinary possibilities." (Ratatouille)

"Shut up, she explained." - Ring Lardner
L.Rai
Posted: Thursday, November 20, 2014 9:23:06 PM

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early_apex wrote:
LRai said: "Like the cockroaches the idea of eating them is just revolting."

That reminds me of a movie quote: "The gag reflex -- once you learn to suppress it, it opens up a whole world of culinary possibilities." (Ratatouille)


Dear EA:

Well that would be great if I could do that, however even after 7 years in China there are still some things I can't stomach. Durian fruit is one for sure that and stinky tofu. Even my worst cold can't get me past the smell of either.

"Your life matters more than you will ever know, so live it well"
early_apex
Posted: Thursday, November 20, 2014 9:43:00 PM

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I have memories of dining out when I was in Taiwan. When I would ask what I was about to eat, the answers usually ranged from "go ahead and try it", " there is no English translation for that", or the ever-popular "I don't know".

No, I didn't like everything I tried, either.

"Shut up, she explained." - Ring Lardner
L.Rai
Posted: Thursday, November 20, 2014 10:11:47 PM

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early_apex wrote:
I have memories of dining out when I was in Taiwan. When I would ask what I was about to eat, the answers usually ranged from "go ahead and try it", " there is no English translation for that", or the ever-popular "I don't know".

No, I didn't like everything I tried, either.


Applause You forgot the best one, "It's really good for you!" followed by a lengthy discussion of why that food is good and what part of your body it will help. I usually cringe when they say "bu ji dao" (I don't know) because I'm fairly sure they do know but they don't want to try to explain it. Eh?

"Your life matters more than you will ever know, so live it well"
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