The Free Dictionary  
mailing list For webmasters
Welcome Guest Forum Search | Active Topics | Members

Auguste Rodin (1840) Options
Daemon
Posted: Wednesday, November 12, 2014 12:00:00 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 3/7/2009
Posts: 27,974
Neurons: 83,100
Location: Inside Farlex computers
Auguste Rodin (1840)

Rodin was a French sculptor noted for his renderings of the human form. He spent 37 years working on The Gates of Hell, a monumental sculptural group commissioned for a proposed Musée des Arts Décoratifs and inspired by Dante's Inferno. The project was never finished, but many of the 186 figures intended for it, including The Thinker, The Three Shades, and The Kiss, were later presented as individual works. Who was The Thinker intended to represent? More...
L.Rai
Posted: Wednesday, November 12, 2014 12:39:32 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 7/20/2014
Posts: 716
Neurons: 1,292,137
Location: Grover Beach, California, United States
Rodin's work is displayed in a outdoor sculpture museum/garden where I live in China. I'm not sure if the pieces are originals (although I've been told they are) however they are very impressive to see.

"Your life matters more than you will ever know, so live it well"
MechPebbles
Posted: Wednesday, November 12, 2014 12:47:06 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 2/21/2014
Posts: 463
Neurons: 226,313
Location: Kuala Lumpur, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia
Isn't it more natural for the human figures to be clothed? I cannot imagine John the Baptist preaching in the nude!
L.Rai
Posted: Wednesday, November 12, 2014 1:11:53 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 7/20/2014
Posts: 716
Neurons: 1,292,137
Location: Grover Beach, California, United States
MechPebbles wrote:
Isn't it more natural for the human figures to be clothed? I cannot imagine John the Baptist preaching in the nude!


Dear MechPebbles:

Well if we are speaking about "art" then artists tend to like to portray the human form in the nude. However, I'd have to agree with you that I too can't imagine dear ol' John running around telling people to repent in the buff. It's an interesting visual, but probably not very likely.

"Your life matters more than you will ever know, so live it well"
NeuroticHellFem
Posted: Wednesday, November 12, 2014 2:04:04 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 7/22/2014
Posts: 2,286
Neurons: 2,499,761
Location: Lilyfield, New South Wales, Australia

Full Size Picture Rodin The Shade

I looks to me like The Shade was left out in the sun & melted.

EDIT: Whoa that's a big picture!



When you make an assumption, you make an ass of u & umption! - NeuroticHellFem
Joy Frohlich
Posted: Wednesday, November 12, 2014 3:42:00 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 3/19/2014
Posts: 301
Neurons: 240,520
Location: Remagen, Rheinland-Pfalz, Germany
MechPebbles - nor can I. However, sculptures of the naked human form seem to be traditional over hundreds of years. As to the comment about The Shade looking as though it was left out in the sun and melted. Some early sculpteurs did fill in their mistakes with wax, and the wax ran when the sun shined. Hence the word "sincere" which literally means "without wax".
Vit Babenco
Posted: Wednesday, November 12, 2014 10:34:43 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 7/16/2014
Posts: 177
Neurons: 259,570
Location: Ivanovo, Ivanovo, Russia
I saw his sculptures in the museum and they were very expressive.
Pieter_Hove
Posted: Wednesday, November 12, 2014 12:29:41 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 1/6/2014
Posts: 464
Neurons: 567,039
Location: Schaerbeek, Brussels Capital Region, Belgium
Joy Frohlich wrote:
MechPebbles - nor can I. However, sculptures of the naked human form seem to be traditional over hundreds of years. As to the comment about The Shade looking as though it was left out in the sun and melted. Some early sculpteurs did fill in their mistakes with wax, and the wax ran when the sun shined. Hence the word "sincere" which literally means "without wax".


Think Look also here for the origin of the word sincerity (under the title Etymology). When I think of it, "sin + cere" ("without + wax") has a rather trivial aspect.
Quote:
Sincerus may have once meant "one growth" (not mixed), from sin- (one) and crescere (to grow).
is what the Oxford Dictionary people and many other scholars think of it.

And I'm being sincere! (if the English language allows me to express myself as such)
monamagda
Posted: Wednesday, November 12, 2014 12:39:43 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 2/4/2014
Posts: 7,208
Neurons: 5,280,133
Location: Bogotá, Bogota D.C., Colombia
The best of Rodin! My fovourite.



The Story Behind Rodin’s ‘The Kiss’

The Kiss was originally conceived as a detail in an early version of Rodin’s The Gates of Hell, a monumental work that preoccupied the artist for the last 37 years of his life. The Kiss depicts the fateful embrace of Francesca and Paolo, adulterous lovers from Dante’s Inferno.

Rodin developed the theme of The Kiss in plaster and terracotta before creating a marble version for the French government in 1888. That piece is now on display at the Musée Rodin in Paris. The version featured in the video was commissioned in 1900 by an American art collector living in England, and is now part of the permanent collection of the Tate Modern in London. It’s currently on loan (through September 2) to the Turner Contemporary in Margate, Kent.

The nudity and frank sensuality of The Kiss drew scorn from many critics when the sculpture was first unveiled in 1889. The poet Paul Claudel, a religious conservative, wrote:

the man is so to speak attablé [sitting down to dine] at the woman. He is sitting down in order to make the most of his opportunity. He uses both his hands, and she does her best, as the Americans say, to “deliver the goods.”

Claudel’s contempt probably had something to do with the fact that his sister, the sculptor Camille Claudel, was Rodin’s lover at the time the work was completed. For a more in-depth exploration of the fascinating story behind The Kiss, be sure to watch the BBC series, Private Life of a Masterpiece. The episode featuring The Kiss can be seen online in four 12-minute segments here.

http://www.openculture.com/2012/02/the_story_behind_rodins_the_kiss.html
striker
Posted: Wednesday, November 12, 2014 4:18:58 PM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 5/30/2014
Posts: 1,698
Neurons: 2,240,255
Location: Roslindale, Massachusetts, United States
the thinker is as famous as the mona lisa
Fredric-frank Myers
Posted: Wednesday, November 12, 2014 4:26:18 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 7/26/2014
Posts: 1,405
Neurons: 37,072
Location: Apache Junction, Arizona, United States
As a "young" art student in the 1950's early 1960's, Rodin's work was beyond inspirational. In my early years I even attempted the subtractive method of sculpture but found it to slow for my minds eye and my desire to produce objects. Now, in the winter of my life I spend sometimes 4 months working on one of my art pieces; I must assume those early years were motivated by a youthful impatient spirit, and, of courses, the deadline of class scheduling and there grading systems.

In any case, I must (again) thank this great artist for his inspiration's and for being able to share his abilities with the world; thank you sir, again and again.....
TB Turtle
Posted: Wednesday, November 12, 2014 10:45:21 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 8/27/2014
Posts: 492
Neurons: 4,068,781
Location: Portland, Maine, United States
Well said Frederic-Frank. And I also agree with MechPebbles.....can Not imagine John the Baptist running around nude.
Users browsing this topic
Guest


Forum Jump
You cannot post new topics in this forum.
You cannot reply to topics in this forum.
You cannot delete your posts in this forum.
You cannot edit your posts in this forum.
You cannot create polls in this forum.
You cannot vote in polls in this forum.

Main Forum RSS : RSS
Forum Terms and Guidelines | Privacy policy | Copyright © 2008-2019 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.