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Bram Stoker (1847) Options
Daemon
Posted: Saturday, November 8, 2014 12:00:00 AM
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Bram Stoker (1847)

Though he was best known during his lifetime as the longtime manager of actor Henry Irving, Stoker's enduring popularity rests squarely on his 1897 Gothic horror tale, Dracula, about the eponymous vampire. Although he did not invent the vampire novel, Dracula is singularly responsible for scores of literary, theatrical, and film interpretations throughout the 20th and 21st centuries. Why did Stoker's widow demand that the 1922 film Nosferatu be destroyed? More...
Vit Babenco
Posted: Saturday, November 8, 2014 4:34:58 AM

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Bram Stoker was a poor writer.
striker
Posted: Saturday, November 8, 2014 8:18:11 AM
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ageless dracula
monamagda
Posted: Saturday, November 8, 2014 8:53:24 AM

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Nosferatu. Eine Symphonie des Grauens. (Nosferatu. A Symphony of Horror.)
A Silent Masterpiece by F.W. Murnau

The earliest surviving screen adaptation of Bram Stoker's Dracula novel has had a long and dangerous life of its own. Almost destroyed by Stoker's widow because of copyright infringement, this film has outlasted many others of the silent era. There are many new releases of Nosferatu and all this goes to show that, "You can't keep a good vampire down."

http://nosferatumovie.com/
MechPebbles
Posted: Saturday, November 8, 2014 9:03:50 AM

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I read Dracula and I enjoyed it. How are his other books?
TB Turtle
Posted: Saturday, November 8, 2014 12:52:46 PM

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He 'influenced' Stephen King, what a surprise.....not really.
xsmith
Posted: Saturday, November 8, 2014 1:01:59 PM
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MechPebbles wrote:
I read Dracula and I enjoyed it. How are his other books?


Having seen many Dracula films as a teen and into my adulthood, I read the novel which is written as a journal. The book was absolutely spelling binding. The closest film adaptation to the novel is Bram Stoker's Dracula. I also enjoyed actor Christopher Lee's treatment of the count. After seeing The Horror of Dracula starring Lee, I could not sleep for a week afterward. It frightened me that much.
NeuroticHellFem
Posted: Saturday, November 8, 2014 11:16:31 PM

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Daemon wrote:
Though he was best known during his lifetime as the longtime manager of actor Henry Irving, Stoker's enduring popularity rests squarely on his 1897 Gothic horror tale, Dracula, about the eponymous vampire. Although he did not invent the vampire novel, Dracula is singularly responsible for scores of literary, theatrical, and film interpretations throughout the 20th and 21st centuries. Why did Stoker's widow demand that the 1922 film Nosferatu be destroyed?

Answer copy/pasted from the article, highlight mine:
Quote:
The first film adaptation of Dracula was released in 1922 and was named Nosferatu. It was directed by Friedrich Wilhelm Murnau and starred Max Schreck as Count Orlock. Nosferatu was produced while Florence Stoker, Bram Stoker's widow and literary executrix, was still alive. Represented by the attorneys of the British Incorporated Society of Authors, she eventually sued the filmmakers. Her chief legal complaint was that she had been neither asked for permission for the adaptation nor paid any royalty. The case dragged on for some years, with Mrs. Stoker demanding the destruction of the negative and all prints of the film. The suit was finally resolved in the widow's favour in July 1925. Some copies of the film survived, however, and the film has become well known.

I've seen that film, a silent classic. The vampire, 'Nosferatu' is genuinely creepy, even though the movie's so cheesy in its production by today's standards.

When you make an assumption, you make an ass of u & umption! - NeuroticHellFem
excaelis
Posted: Saturday, November 8, 2014 11:45:30 PM

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@ xsmith : 'spellbinding' is, I think, the word you seek.

Sanity is not statistical
Fredric-frank Myers
Posted: Tuesday, November 11, 2014 9:51:02 PM

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You have really got to love the mind of this author, ouch and ouch again,,,,,,
pedro
Posted: Thursday, November 13, 2014 4:14:01 AM

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One of the broadsheets serialised another of his books, equally unmemorable, but Hammer Horror films owes much to him it must be said.

All good ideas arrive by chance- Max Ernst
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