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It is a far, far better thing that I do, than I have ever done; it is a far, far better rest that I go to, than I have ever... Options
Daemon
Posted: Sunday, October 19, 2014 12:00:00 AM
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It is a far, far better thing that I do, than I have ever done; it is a far, far better rest that I go to, than I have ever known.

Charles Dickens (1812-1870)
maroo
Posted: Sunday, October 19, 2014 12:28:18 AM

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A Tale of Two Cities
Vit Babenco
Posted: Sunday, October 19, 2014 2:01:00 AM

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It was the best of times, it was the worst of times, it was the age of wisdom, it was the age of foolishness...
MechPebbles
Posted: Sunday, October 19, 2014 2:10:52 AM

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The closing lines to A Tale of Two Cities.
thar
Posted: Sunday, October 19, 2014 2:21:03 AM

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Bully_rus
Posted: Sunday, October 19, 2014 3:48:15 AM
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to thar

One of these moving parts of history, including movie history...
Bully_rus
Posted: Sunday, October 19, 2014 4:01:18 AM
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Vit Babenco wrote:
It was the best of times, it was the worst of times, it was the age of wisdom, it was the age of foolishness...


It is quite arrogant suggestion if we take into account the year - 1859. We can only guess whether we have reached the awesomeness of "best and worst" or not. On my part, the best of madness (don't miss with foolishness) is yet to come. Thanks for quote...
NeuroticHellFem
Posted: Sunday, October 19, 2014 6:42:47 AM

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Dickens was so didactic & formulaic, yet for all his faults I love his novels & his humour.

When you make an assumption, you make an ass of u & umption! - NeuroticHellFem
ChristopherJohnson
Posted: Sunday, October 19, 2014 7:27:04 AM

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NeuroticHellFem wrote:
Dickens was so didactic & formulaic, yet for all his faults I love his novels & his humour.


You are right, of course. He was didactic, religious and so on. It is natural, for he lived in the 19th century. On the other hand (here you are also absolutely correct) his novels, his sense of humour, his extended similes and metaphors are great. And it is very exciting and interesting to read his books. What makes me extremely sad, is that he died before he could finish the Mystery of Edwin Drood. It would be so interesting to know what really happened, who Mr Datchery really is and so on!
ithink140
Posted: Sunday, October 19, 2014 8:08:25 AM

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Dickens novels… I have his complete works… are moralistic, but not excessively so. He works are often, but not always, a commentary on the social conditions and mores of his times, and of necessity that involves right or wrong. They are not a rail against the rich, or just the establishment alone, for he often shows up the working classes and the poor as their own worst enemies.

They are an invaluable treatise on the conditions existing in society at the time. Yes, they often dwell on the injustices practised by the legal world and the imbalances between rich and poor, but the reader is drawn in and can reach his/her own conclusions.

I too love his wit and humour and forgive him his long rambling sentences which one gets accustomed too. His writing is very musical… rythmetic… and his characterisation second to none, in my view. I love the humour in the character Mark Tapley, for example, and the outrageous hypocrisy of Mr Pecksniff in Martin Chuzzlewit. He is also good at pathos in his writings and gets to the imagination of the reader.

His exposure of the dreadful Mrs Gamp, and the scourge of ‘mothers ruin’ manifested in the form of gin, is well done. He often attacks the law as needing reform. His exposure of the conditions of the workhouses did a public service.

He pulls at the heartstrings in his portrayal of failed family life and of redemption for some.

As to being formulaic… then every writer adopts a style or form, and that is no drawback. One can hardly call Dickens hackneyed since his works still resonate afresh, and his commentaries on the foibles of human nature remain, in my view, as valid today as they were in his time.

Much of Dickens humour comes from exaggeration of a kernel of truth. Take the novel Mr Pickwick as an example. He so cleverly mixes truth with fiction, and the reader can recognise both.

I love Dickens books.


'Life is too short to be eaten up by hate.'
monamagda
Posted: Sunday, October 19, 2014 11:16:13 AM

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This quote from: "Tale of Two Cities" - Book 3 - The Track of a Storm - Chapter 15 - The Footsteps Die Out For Ever

"I see a beautiful city and a brilliant people rising from this abyss, and, in their struggles to be truly free, in their triumphs and defeats, through long years to come, I see the evil of this time and of the previous time of which this is the natural birth, gradually making expiation for itself and wearing out. . . .
I see that child who lay upon her bosom and who bore my name, a man winning his way up in that path of life which once was mine. I see him winning it so well, that my name is made illustrious there by the light of his. . . .
It is a far, far better thing that I do, than I have ever done; it is a far, far better rest I go to than I have ever known.
The end."


Read the book :
http://www.literature.org/authors/dickens-charles/two-cities/book-03/chapter-15.html

Comments
The thoughts contained in this passage, which the narrator attributes to Carton as he awaits his sacrificial death. This passage, which occurs in the final chapter, prophesies two resurrections: one personal, the other national. In a novel that seeks to examine the nature of revolution—the overturning of one way of life for another—the struggles of France and of Sydney Carton mirror each other. Here, Dickens articulates the outcome of those struggles: just as Paris will “ris[e] from [the] abyss” of the French Revolution’s chaotic and bloody violence, so too will Carton be reborn into glory after a virtually wasted life. In the prophecy that Paris will become “a beautiful city” and that Carton’s name will be “made illustrious,” the reader sees evidence of Dickens’s faith in the essential goodness of humankind. The very last thoughts attributed to Carton, in their poetic use of repetition, register this faith as a calm and soothing certainty.


http://www.sparknotes.com/lit/twocities/quotes.html
Fredric-frank Myers
Posted: Sunday, October 19, 2014 1:53:49 PM

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Charles Dickens, an author that should be required read for all student but also reread monthly, or more often by members of America's political parties. Though the "liberals" do seem to understand his writings' much more then the Republicans will ever comprehend...
striker
Posted: Sunday, October 19, 2014 2:21:12 PM
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the man was born to write
Verbatim
Posted: Sunday, October 19, 2014 3:51:51 PM
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Perhaps some actuality of "A Tale of Two Cities" in our day and age is that it may yet become "A Tale of Many Cities", given some similar circumstances, of which Dickens had warned about.
TB Turtle
Posted: Sunday, October 19, 2014 4:41:31 PM

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Dickens, its impossible to pick a favorite.
PiTi
Posted: Sunday, October 19, 2014 10:43:39 PM

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Wonderful novel but I read it many years ago and although I loved it I cannot recall much from it with the possible exception of the line (final one in the book if I'm not mistaken) quoted. Having said that, and context notwithstanding,I think Dickens may have been trying to say something about pain, suffering and the cost of overcoming both to achieve some kind of moral or ethical victory. The importance, in some instances and circumstances, of dispensing with "identity" and disregarding mortality for a noble ideal and achieving same by such sacrifice.
Verbatim
Posted: Monday, October 20, 2014 4:40:38 PM
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Daemon wrote:
It is a far, far better thing that I do, than I have ever done; it is a far, far better rest that I go to, than I have ever known.

Charles Dickens (1812-1870)



There is always hope in the world, and even the ambivalent Sydney Carton is allowed a chance at redemption as Dickens concludes his tale of human turmoil.
But why do the echoes still linger?
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