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Daemon
Posted: Monday, September 29, 2014 12:00:00 AM
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descry

(verb) To catch sight of (something difficult to discern).

Synonyms: spot, spy

Usage: From the top of the hill I descried a solitary rider.
walirlan
Posted: Monday, September 29, 2014 3:42:32 AM

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Location: Mayo, Connaught, Ireland
1a : to spy out or come to see especially with watchful attention and careful observation of the distant, uncertain, or obscure

<the grass was high in the meadow, and there was no descrying her — George Eliot>

b : to attain to the realization or understanding of : discover

<examine the legend in a more critical spirit and descry the reasons for Toscanini's preeminence — Times Literary Supplement>

2 obsolete

a : to make known (as one's name) : declare

b : betray

3 obsolete : challenge

4 obsolete : decry

Origin of DESCRY

Middle English descrien, from Old French descrier to proclaim, decry — more at decry

First Known Use: 14th century (sense 1a)

Synonyms:

ascertain, find, detect, determine, dig out, dig up, discover, dredge (up), ferret (out), find out, get, hit (on or upon), hunt (down or up), learn, locate, nose out, root (out), rout (out), rummage, run down, scare up, scout (up), track (down), turn up

Antonyms:

miss, overlook, pass over

Related Words:

espy, sight, spot; look for, search (for or out), seek

Near Antonyms:

lose, mislay, misplace, misset
monamagda
Posted: Monday, September 29, 2014 6:56:43 AM

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Word History: You have many very Good Words in your future. English borrowed the mother of today's word twice from French. Middle English borrowed descry "catch sight of" from Old French descrier "to call, cry out" from des- "from" + crier "to cry". Later on, after the [s] dropped out of the French verb, we borrowed it again as decry "to condemn" from the modern form, décrier. No one is sure where the original Latin word came from. It came to French as crier from Vulgar (spoken) Latin critare, a later corruption of Latin quiritare "to cry out". Some speculate this verb came from quirites, public officers (burgesses) to whom Romans might appeal (cry out?) to in times of need. The root of this word is probably related to query and querulous, supporting this theory.

Alphadictionary.com
rogermue
Posted: Monday, September 29, 2014 8:22:59 AM

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"to descry", a word that you don't read so often. COD marks this word as lierary. I never thought about its origin. But now, after reading the above posts, I can connect a clear situation: a watch on the belfry of a medieval fortress can give alarm when seeing the ennemy approaching. He cries down to the men below: The ennemy is comming! - Latin de meaning down to, French crier/ English to cry, the s in to descry probably the remainder of Latin ex meaning out. Though the word origin actually means to cry out from a high watching post, it means to catch sight of something, the first condition for giving the alarm.

Similar word: to decry meaning to state publicly that one condemns something or someone.
rogermue
Posted: Monday, September 29, 2014 8:22:59 AM

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rogermue
Posted: Monday, September 29, 2014 8:27:39 AM

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To monamagda - You did a good job! Applause
rossalicia
Posted: Monday, September 29, 2014 9:04:25 AM

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Location: Santiago, Santiago, Chile
If you spot something, you descry it. When you spy it, you descry it. It's a good verb to use when you catch a glimpse of a rare bird in the trees.

Descry is very similar to "see" or "discern," but involves more than just keeping your eyes open. Usually you descry something after observing carefully for a while. Wrote Ovid, the Ancient Roman poet and author: “Time on time revolving we descry, so moments flit, so moments fly.” Apparently, even in antiquity people complained about seeing the time go by too quickly.

http://www.vocabulary.com/dictionary/descry
Alice M Toaster
Posted: Monday, September 29, 2014 10:13:46 AM

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rogermue wrote:
To monamagda - You did a good job! Applause

Yes. Well done!

Just trying to figure out the difference between
Dialectrum
Posted: Monday, September 29, 2014 1:40:59 PM

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I'll give you something to descry about.
Absurdicuss
Posted: Monday, September 29, 2014 4:23:51 PM

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Location: Jefferson, South Carolina, United States

Emerging from the featureless plane before us we began through squinting eyes to descry on the horizon a dark familiar node.



"Now" is the eternal present.
nkelsey
Posted: Monday, September 29, 2014 8:45:04 PM
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Location: Apóstoles, Misiones, Argentina
Applause
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