The Free Dictionary  
mailing list For webmasters
Welcome Guest Forum Search | Active Topics | Members

Nice car, that of your brother. Options
loureed4
Posted: Wednesday, August 27, 2014 10:08:03 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 5/10/2014
Posts: 155
Neurons: 1,760
Location: Sevilla, Andalusia, Spain
Hello,

I am translating a sentence into English, and I did it like this: "Nice car, that of your brother!!."

but someone keeps telling me it is not correct and can't figure out why. (she does not want to tell me why, sort of secretive.)

Thanks in advance! :-)
tunaafi
Posted: Wednesday, August 27, 2014 10:10:21 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 6/3/2014
Posts: 4,453
Neurons: 53,503
Location: Karlín, Praha, Czech Republic
Your version is not a complete sentence. This is: Nice car your brother's got.
Alice M Toaster
Posted: Wednesday, August 27, 2014 10:25:40 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/4/2013
Posts: 32,011
Neurons: 1,249,930
Location: San Martin, California, United States
Or, you could say: "Nice car your brother has."

♫♪Don't suffocate on your own hate♪♫
aylin ella
Posted: Wednesday, August 27, 2014 10:41:06 AM

Rank: Newbie

Joined: 8/27/2014
Posts: 10
Neurons: 931
Location: Budapest, Budapest, Hungary
You'd say that in this way " Nice car!, is it your brother's?" or you could say " nice car!, is it of your brother?"
Hope that helps:)
Or if you are commenting then " Your brother's got a nice car!" or "that car of your brother is nice!"
tunaafi
Posted: Wednesday, August 27, 2014 11:11:06 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 6/3/2014
Posts: 4,453
Neurons: 53,503
Location: Karlín, Praha, Czech Republic
aylin ella wrote:
you could say " nice car!, is it of your brother?"


That one is not natural English.
Romany
Posted: Wednesday, August 27, 2014 11:11:07 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 6/14/2009
Posts: 14,385
Neurons: 44,801
Location: Brighton, England, United Kingdom
aylin -

Sorry, but "Nice car! Is it of your brother?" is not valid English. Also, as the original sentence was a statement and didn't ask WHOSE car it was, I'm afraid neither of your first two sentences work in this context.
mirilli
Posted: Wednesday, August 27, 2014 12:17:59 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/28/2013
Posts: 195
Neurons: 1,244,818
Location: Gubbio, Umbria, Italy
Romany wrote:
aylin -

Sorry, but "Nice car! Is it of your brother?" is not valid English. Also, as the original sentence was a statement and didn't ask WHOSE car it was, I'm afraid neither of your first two sentences work in this context.


Nice car, your brother's one.
Is this what you mean?
tunaafi
Posted: Wednesday, August 27, 2014 12:20:40 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 6/3/2014
Posts: 4,453
Neurons: 53,503
Location: Karlín, Praha, Czech Republic
mirilli wrote:
Nice car, your brother's one.


That's not very natural, either.
c5ster
Posted: Wednesday, August 27, 2014 1:24:58 PM

Rank: Newbie

Joined: 6/27/2014
Posts: 10
Neurons: 655
Location: Crockett, California, United States
Native Californian here, drop the 'one' from above... “Nice car; your brother's", which is telling someone that their brother has a nice car. If this were dialog from a movie I'd expect to see a person yelling out to someone in a car as they drove by, “Hey, nice car. Your brother's ..." like they liked his car and making the driver feel good only to be smashed when they clarified they weren't talking about HIS car, but his brothers car.
rogermue
Posted: Wednesday, August 27, 2014 3:13:35 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 1/28/2012
Posts: 5,047
Neurons: 34,900
Location: München, Bavaria, Germany
If you like to keep your formulation, I would say: Nice car, the one of your brother.
But I'd prefer: That's a nice car your brother has got.
tunaafi
Posted: Wednesday, August 27, 2014 3:29:38 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 6/3/2014
Posts: 4,453
Neurons: 53,503
Location: Karlín, Praha, Czech Republic
rogermue wrote:
If you like to keep your formulation, I would say: Nice car, the one of your brother.
But I'd prefer: That's a nice car your brother has got.


The first of those two is just not natural English.
dave freak
Posted: Wednesday, August 27, 2014 3:35:55 PM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 4/29/2013
Posts: 1,628
Neurons: 6,628
Just an experimental question. What about:

"Nice car, that one of your brother's."
"Nice, that car your brother's got."

I'm just asking.
tunaafi
Posted: Wednesday, August 27, 2014 3:44:49 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 6/3/2014
Posts: 4,453
Neurons: 53,503
Location: Karlín, Praha, Czech Republic
dave freak wrote:
Just an experimental question. What about:

"Nice car, that one of your brother's."
"Nice, that car your brother's got."


At the risk of appearing even more arrogant than I usually do, I'd say that Alice Morgan and I cracked this in the second and third posts of this thread. C5ster and Romany have added useful thoughts. You can keep suggesting alternatives, but I fear we'll reject most of them. Your two are possible, but not as natural as those already suggested.
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Wednesday, August 27, 2014 3:45:16 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/12/2011
Posts: 30,140
Neurons: 176,780
Location: Livingston, Scotland, United Kingdom
As the others have said - it is not a full sentence.

However, in conversation, a sentence "It's a nice car! - I mean your brother's car." may be abridged to "Nice car! - Your brother's (one)." or possibly "Nice car - the one of your brother's!" as a quick comment.

Edited to add - the first one sounds more natural - "Nice car! - Your brother's."


Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
dave freak
Posted: Wednesday, August 27, 2014 3:46:24 PM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 4/29/2013
Posts: 1,628
Neurons: 6,628
Tuna, you are just the Insufferable Pedant. Dancing You must have graduated from the same university as LeonAzul. Whistle
loureed4
Posted: Wednesday, August 27, 2014 3:56:33 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 5/10/2014
Posts: 155
Neurons: 1,760
Location: Sevilla, Andalusia, Spain



Thank you !! .

Is it too much to ask why "Nice car, that of your brother." ?

Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Wednesday, August 27, 2014 4:03:47 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/12/2011
Posts: 30,140
Neurons: 176,780
Location: Livingston, Scotland, United Kingdom
Hi lou!

I'd say that it is because you are mixing a very colloquial comment with a rather formal phrasing.

"I saw a nice car - that of your brother." is very formal
"I saw a nice car - your brother's." is informal (but correct grammar).

If you are going to abridge it as if in conversation, you would not use the formal format.


Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
tunaafi
Posted: Wednesday, August 27, 2014 4:13:54 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 6/3/2014
Posts: 4,453
Neurons: 53,503
Location: Karlín, Praha, Czech Republic
dave freak wrote:
Tuna, you are just the Insufferable Pedant.


I do my best.
Alice M Toaster
Posted: Wednesday, August 27, 2014 6:06:04 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/4/2013
Posts: 32,011
Neurons: 1,249,930
Location: San Martin, California, United States
tunaafi wrote:
dave freak wrote:
Tuna, you are just the Insufferable Pedant.

I do my best.

tunaafi, I consider that my life is lived in a pit of social deprivation. I'd love to have someone like you in my area. Insufferable Pedant, and all.

While everyone had given reasonable input on this, getting back to the original post of loureed4, it's a translation; so, it seems that it might be helpful to know the original language, and how it's phrased, thusly.

♫♪Don't suffocate on your own hate♪♫
♡Borbotrincess♡
Posted: Wednesday, August 27, 2014 6:13:59 PM

Rank: Member

Joined: 3/28/2014
Posts: 110
Neurons: 76,487
Location: Urbana, Illinois, United States
"Nice car, your brother's".
loureed4
Posted: Wednesday, August 27, 2014 7:45:53 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 5/10/2014
Posts: 155
Neurons: 1,760
Location: Sevilla, Andalusia, Spain
Thank you !! .

Is it too much to ask why "Nice car, that of your brother." is not correct?

I am studying the structure "that of...." , but I cannot understand why it is wrong here.
Romany
Posted: Thursday, August 28, 2014 11:29:54 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 6/14/2009
Posts: 14,385
Neurons: 44,801
Location: Brighton, England, United Kingdom
Loureed - it isn't WRONG - in a text-book sense. It's more a question of it being an out-dated way of speaking.

When I say something isn't "valid" English, that means that though it might fit grammatically - or be used in an ESL text-book to explain a point - it's just not something any native speaker would ever say.

The reasons might be many: it might be considered old-fashioned; it might sound harsh; or simply not be pleasing to a native ear; it's rhythm might not sound English; it might sound too much like another phrase; it may make the speaker sound like an idiot......or of course, the grammar might simply be dodgy. (Though that is usually described clearly as 'ungrammatical').

In this case both the first and the second-last reasons (old-fashioned AND you'd sound like an idiot saying it) apply.
Users browsing this topic
Guest


Forum Jump
You cannot post new topics in this forum.
You cannot reply to topics in this forum.
You cannot delete your posts in this forum.
You cannot edit your posts in this forum.
You cannot create polls in this forum.
You cannot vote in polls in this forum.

Main Forum RSS : RSS
Forum Terms and Guidelines | Privacy policy | Copyright © 2008-2018 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.