The Free Dictionary  
mailing list For webmasters
Welcome Guest Forum Search | Active Topics | Members

The Sistine Chapel Options
Daemon
Posted: Monday, August 18, 2014 12:00:00 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 3/7/2009
Posts: 28,235
Neurons: 83,883
Location: Inside Farlex computers
The Sistine Chapel

The Sistine Chapel is located in the Palace of the Vatican, the official residence of the Pope in Vatican City. It was built between 1473 and 1481 and is known for its artwork—especially the ceiling paintings by Michelangelo. Attracted to ambitious sculptural projects—which he did not always complete—Michelangelo agreed to the project reluctantly. His confidence grew in time, and he devoted his last 30 years to The Last Judgment fresco in the chapel. For whom is the Sistine Chapel named? More...
Franklyn Wesley
Posted: Monday, August 18, 2014 4:25:55 AM

Rank: Member

Joined: 12/30/2013
Posts: 44
Neurons: 7,175
Location: Nyeri, Central, Kenya
Daemon wrote:
The Sistine Chapel

The Sistine Chapel is located in the Palace of the Vatican, the official residence of the Pope in Vatican City. It was built between 1473 and 1481 and is known for its artwork—especially the ceiling paintings by Michelangelo. Attracted to ambitious sculptural projects—which he did not always complete—Michelangelo agreed to the project reluctantly. His confidence grew in time, and he devoted his last 30 years to The Last Judgment fresco in the chapel. For whom is the Sistine Chapel named? More...
stefan
Posted: Monday, August 18, 2014 4:25:59 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 5/18/2014
Posts: 164
Neurons: 3,293,044
Location: Częstochowa, Silesian Voivodeship, Poland
The chapel takes its name from Pope Sixtus IV, who restored the old Cappella Magna between 1477 and 1480.
Ragul Ragavendran
Posted: Monday, August 18, 2014 6:32:37 AM

Rank: Newbie

Joined: 3/5/2014
Posts: 4
Neurons: 479
Location: Trichy, Tamil Nadu, India
The Sistine Chapel is located in the Palace of the Vatican, the official residence of the Pope in Vatican City. It was built between 1473 and 1481 and is known for its artwork—especially the ceiling paintings by Michelangelo. Attracted to ambitious sculptural projects—which he did not always complete—Michelangelo agreed to the project reluctantly. His confidence grew in time, and he devoted his last 30 years to The Last Judgment fresco in the chapel. For whom is the Sistine Chapel named? pedia.thefreedictionary.com/sistine+chapel">More...[/quote]


"everything is good" Drool
rossalicia
Posted: Monday, August 18, 2014 8:55:43 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 3/27/2014
Posts: 1,526
Neurons: 55,870
Location: Santiago, Santiago, Chile
The chapel was dear to Julius II, built by his uncle Pope Sixtus IV in 1477 from whom it took its name.
Gary98
Posted: Monday, August 18, 2014 12:18:12 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 7/23/2014
Posts: 1,675
Neurons: 4,444,508
Location: Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States
Still does Pope ever get tired of looking at it? I would want to go out and feel the grass, and look at some real things.
Gary98
Posted: Monday, August 18, 2014 12:20:42 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 7/23/2014
Posts: 1,675
Neurons: 4,444,508
Location: Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States
Pope and I can change place for a day and both of us should be quite happy
monamagda
Posted: Monday, August 18, 2014 12:41:21 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 2/4/2014
Posts: 7,274
Neurons: 5,360,635
Location: Bogotá, Bogota D.C., Colombia
Michelangelo and Pope Julius II (The Warrior Pope)("Il papa terribile")(

It was due in part to the relentless drive of this outrageous pontiff that the High Renaissance progressed in Rome with more urgency and grandeur than it did in Florence.
Commissioned by Julius II to create a tomb for him of unparalleled power and grandeur, Michelangelo could not have foreseen that the tomb would become a forty-year nightmare. The relationship between the two men was difficult. The explosive and unyielding artist was ferocious in his dealings with his patrons, both papal and secular, and he regarded them with neither fear nor favor.

An item which regularly interposes between Michelangelo and the popes’ commissions for the Sistine Chapel is the Tomb of Julius II. This monument, which can be admired in the church of St. Peter in Chains in Rome, centred on the statue of Moses, had been commissioned to him by Julius II around 1505. The work was then interrupted for the commitment of Michelangelo in the Sistine Chapel. But in 1533, 20 years after the death of Julius II, it was not completed yet. So, when the pope Clemens VII called again Michelangelo to operate in the Sistine Chapel, the artist was pursued by the heirs of Julius II, who had paid for the work and claimed to have it finished. Clemens VII and his successor Paul III had to intervene to obtain Michelangelo can attend the works for the fresco of the altar wall in the Chapel. Michelangelo defined the monument to Julius II as “the tragedy of the Tomb”.

http://entertainment.howstuffworks.com/arts/artwork/michelangelo-biography5.htm
http://mviola.hubpages.com/hub/Sistine-Chapel-Facts-Michelangelo-and-the-Popes-Who-Created-the-Masterpiece-of-Western-Art
NeuroticHellFem
Posted: Monday, August 18, 2014 12:46:35 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 7/22/2014
Posts: 2,288
Neurons: 2,539,917
Location: Lilyfield, New South Wales, Australia


I was amazed when I first heard that the figure of God in The Creation of Adam fresco was resting inside what looked like an anatomically correct human brain! Michelangelo must have studied from cadavers! Controversial & illegal. I clicked on the link in the article & found out about a uterus theory too!

Copy/pasted below from the link: http://encyclopedia.thefreedictionary.com/The+Creation+of+Adam

]Anatomical theories
Several hypotheses have been put forward about the meaning of The Creation of Adam's highly original composition, many of them taking Michelangelo's well-documented expertise in human anatomy as their starting point. In 1990, an Anderson, Indiana physician named Frank Lynn Meshberger, M.D. noted in the medical publication the Journal of the American Medical Association that the background figures and shapes portrayed behind the figure of God appeared to be an anatomically accurate picture of the human brain.[5] Dr. Meshberger's interpretation has been discussed by Dr. Mark Lee Appler.[6] On close examination, borders in the painting correlate with major sulci of the cerebrum in the inner and outer surface of the brain, the brain stem, the frontal lobe, the basilar artery, the pituitary gland and the optic chiasm.[5]

Alternatively, it has been observed that the red cloth around God has the shape of a human uterus (one art historian has called it a "uterine mantle"[7]), and that the scarf hanging out, coloured green, could be a newly cut umbilical cord.[8] "This is an interesting hypothesis that presents the Creation scene as an idealised representation of the physical birth of man. It explains the navel that appears on Adam, which is at first perplexing because he was created, not born of a woman."[

When you make an assumption, you make an ass of u & umption! - NeuroticHellFem
Milica Boghunovich
Posted: Monday, August 18, 2014 1:56:30 PM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 8/5/2014
Posts: 1,011
Neurons: 144,425
Sacellum Sixtinum was named after Pope Sixtus IV who ordered the renovation of the old Papal Chapel. He had his own portraits put on the walls of the Sistine Chapel to immortalize his own name, but justly it was dedicated to the Virgin Mary, the eternal representation of a self-sacrificing mother figure. Michelangelo's "The Last Judgment", a timeless work of art, stays ironically as a reminder that the Popes are not the final judges, and that the whole establishment rests on the hard and honest work of peasants (farmers), and laborers' sweat/ the high taxes collected from those who were/are struggling daily to feed and provide basic existence for the body and soul.
nkelsey
Posted: Monday, August 18, 2014 4:48:54 PM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 2/9/2014
Posts: 491
Neurons: 192,145
Location: Apóstoles, Misiones, Argentina
It took Michelangelo four years to complete the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel. He proceeded from east to west, starting from the entrance of the Chapel to finish above the altar. The last panel he painted depicts God separating light from darkness.
Vicki Holzknecht
Posted: Monday, August 18, 2014 6:41:55 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 1/8/2014
Posts: 257
Neurons: 61,514
Location: Sylva, North Carolina, United States
I have always wanted to visit the Sistine Chapel.
Users browsing this topic
Guest


Forum Jump
You cannot post new topics in this forum.
You cannot reply to topics in this forum.
You cannot delete your posts in this forum.
You cannot edit your posts in this forum.
You cannot create polls in this forum.
You cannot vote in polls in this forum.

Main Forum RSS : RSS
Forum Terms and Guidelines | Privacy policy | Copyright © 2008-2019 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.