The Free Dictionary  
mailing list For webmasters
Welcome Guest Forum Search | Active Topics | Members

Ihren Namen Options
frosty rime
Posted: Saturday, August 2, 2014 3:35:22 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 7/4/2012
Posts: 1,446
Neurons: 13,151
Hallo alle,

I have just started revision and spotted the sentence below:

Wie Schreibt man Ihren Namen?


Namen is plural of der Name and its accusative should be Ihre.
But in the given sentence, it is Ihren Namen.
Is it right or have I gotten something wrong in understanding German Grammar?
I found this in the book I am studying with.

Brick wall ]

Danke in Voraus

devil rides vocabularies.
IMcRout
Posted: Saturday, August 2, 2014 4:50:54 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 5/27/2011
Posts: 35,196
Neurons: 545,414
Location: Lübeck, Schleswig-Holstein, Germany
Singular
Nominativ: der Name
Genitiv: des Namens
Dativ: dem Namen
Akkusativ: den Namen

Plural
Nominativ: die Namen
Genitiv: der Namen
Dativ: den Namen
Akkusativ: die Namen

"Wie schreibt man Ihren Namen?" - This is correct.

"Ihren", with a capital 'I' is the polite form of addressing someone.
"Deinen" would be the more familiar way.
In Englisch both forms are represented by 'your name' (unless we revert to Shakespearean times or biblical language and say 'thy name').

As you - rightly - say, we need the accusative case, but the singular one, not the plural form. Those would look like this:

"Wie schreibt man Ihre Namen?" (polite)
"Wie schreibt man Eure Namen?" (familiar)
--> How do you spell your names?

Tricky language, isn't it?

By the way. It's better to start with "Hallo" or "Hallo zusammen".
Und am Schluss heißt es "Danke im Voraus."


I totally take back all those times I didn't want to nap when I was younger. (Anon)
frosty rime
Posted: Saturday, August 2, 2014 5:17:21 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 7/4/2012
Posts: 1,446
Neurons: 13,151
IMcRout wrote:
Singular
Nominativ: der Name
Genitiv: des Namens
Dativ: dem Namen
Akkusativ: den Namen

Plural
Nominativ: die Namen
Genitiv: der Namen
Dativ: den Namen
Akkusativ: die Namen

"Wie schreibt man Ihren Namen?" - This is correct.

"Ihren", with a capital 'I' is the polite form of addressing someone.
"Deinen" would be the more familiar way.
In Englisch both forms are represented by 'your name' (unless we revert to Shakespearean times or biblical language and say 'thy name').

As you - rightly - say, we need the accusative case, but the singular one, not the plural form. Those would look like this:

"Wie schreibt man Ihre Namen?" (polite)
"Wie schreibt man Eure Namen?" (familiar)
--> How do you spell your names?

Tricky language, isn't it?

By the way. It's better to start with "Hallo" or "Hallo zusammen".
Und am Schluss heißt es "Danke im Voraus."




oh I see. Namen isn't plural but singular..d'oh! Brick wall

Thanks so much, IMcROUT. I owe you so much. How can I pay back?

oh..yes..It is "im" Voraus.

"Hallo zusammen" is good to learn. Thanks for that.

Language is indeed very difficult to learn.



devil rides vocabularies.
frosty rime
Posted: Saturday, August 2, 2014 5:55:17 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 7/4/2012
Posts: 1,446
Neurons: 13,151


devil rides vocabularies.
IMcRout
Posted: Sunday, August 3, 2014 7:56:26 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 5/27/2011
Posts: 35,196
Neurons: 545,414
Location: Lübeck, Schleswig-Holstein, Germany


I totally take back all those times I didn't want to nap when I was younger. (Anon)
tunaafi
Posted: Sunday, August 3, 2014 9:20:32 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 6/3/2014
Posts: 4,453
Neurons: 53,503
Location: Karlín, Praha, Czech Republic
This may be of interest, frosty: http://german.about.com/od/grammar/a/dernouns.htm
frosty rime
Posted: Sunday, August 3, 2014 11:54:08 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 7/4/2012
Posts: 1,446
Neurons: 13,151
tunaafi wrote:
This may be of interest, frosty: http://german.about.com/od/grammar/a/dernouns.htm


I see, Tunaafi..
danke,

devil rides vocabularies.
Harpagon
Posted: Monday, August 4, 2014 2:56:13 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 4/15/2014
Posts: 132
Neurons: 43,712
Location: Ştefan Vodă, Stefan-Voda, Moldova
Sehr interessant!

Vergesst bitte nicht mich zu verbessern, wenn ich Fehler mache. Ich wäre euch sehr dankbar.
IMcRout
Posted: Monday, August 4, 2014 5:02:44 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 5/27/2011
Posts: 35,196
Neurons: 545,414
Location: Lübeck, Schleswig-Holstein, Germany
Danke, tunaafi. Von einigen Dingen hatte ich noch nie gehört.

I totally take back all those times I didn't want to nap when I was younger. (Anon)
tunaafi
Posted: Tuesday, August 5, 2014 2:59:44 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 6/3/2014
Posts: 4,453
Neurons: 53,503
Location: Karlín, Praha, Czech Republic
IMcRout wrote:
Danke, tunaafi. Von einigen Dingen hatte ich noch nie gehört.


Ich hatte diese Regeln in der Schule gelernt - das war aber vor fünfig Jahren. In der Zwischenzeit habe ich fast alle vergessen
frosty rime
Posted: Saturday, August 9, 2014 9:31:31 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 7/4/2012
Posts: 1,446
Neurons: 13,151
Are "Deutsche", "Fremde", "Junge", "alte", "Beamte" both gender, female and male?

In my book, "Deutscher" is "Der Deutscher" and "Deutsche" is "die Deutsche".
d'oh!

devil rides vocabularies.
IMcRout
Posted: Saturday, August 9, 2014 11:01:14 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 5/27/2011
Posts: 35,196
Neurons: 545,414
Location: Lübeck, Schleswig-Holstein, Germany
Es kommt darauf an, ob es ein Nomen oder ein Adjektiv ist.

Der Deutsche (= männlich) - Die Deutsche (=weiblich)
Ein Deutscher (m.) - Eine Deutsche (w.)
Ein deutscher Mann - Eine deutsche Frau - Ein deutsches Kind: Adjektive

Ähnlich sind der Fremde, die Fremde etc. sowie der Alte, die Alte ... und auch die Adjektive dazu : Der alte Mann, eine fremde Frau etc.

Der Junge (boy) ist als Nomen nur männlich. Als Adjektiv kann jung ebenso wie die anderen Adjektive gebraucht werden.

Der Beamte - die Beamtin. Kein Adjektiv

Hilft das?

I totally take back all those times I didn't want to nap when I was younger. (Anon)
frosty rime
Posted: Saturday, August 9, 2014 2:16:12 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 7/4/2012
Posts: 1,446
Neurons: 13,151
IMcRout wrote:
Es kommt darauf an, ob es ein Nomen oder ein Adjektiv ist.

Der Deutsche (= männlich) - Die Deutsche (=weiblich)
Ein Deutscher (m.) - Eine Deutsche (w.)
Ein deutscher Mann - Eine deutsche Frau - Ein deutsches Kind: Adjektive

Ähnlich sind der Fremde, die Fremde etc. sowie der Alte, die Alte ... und auch die Adjektive dazu : Der alte Mann, eine fremde Frau etc.

Der Junge (boy) ist als Nomen nur männlich. Als Adjektiv kann jung ebenso wie die anderen Adjektive gebraucht werden.

Der Beamte - die Beamtin. Kein Adjektiv

Hilft das?



DANKE,IMACROUT

ES IST SEHR SCHWER.




devil rides vocabularies.
Users browsing this topic
Guest


Forum Jump
You cannot post new topics in this forum.
You cannot reply to topics in this forum.
You cannot delete your posts in this forum.
You cannot edit your posts in this forum.
You cannot create polls in this forum.
You cannot vote in polls in this forum.

Main Forum RSS : RSS
Forum Terms and Guidelines. Copyright © 2008-2018 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.