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Al Blanco
Posted: Monday, July 07, 2014 3:14:45 AM
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Are these meanings of the word ‘chuck’ in use?

chuck-1 n. A cut of beef extending from the neck to the ribs and including the shoulder blade.

chuck-2 n (Physical Geography) a large body of water

chuck-3 n. food; provisions.


(many thanks for answers in the ‘cuff’ thread)
thar
Posted: Monday, July 07, 2014 3:53:15 AM

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1 yes,


2 maybe in US, but I have only ever heard of it in the context of a chuck wagon, in old westerns!

3 Never heard of it. Maybe not BE. This would explain why!
Quote:
2. (Physical Geography) short for saltchuck. [C19: from Chinook Jargon, from Nootka chauk].

Physical geography uses a lot of local names for things, but I don't think this one made it internationally! Chinook is a native American tribal/language group.

Also, and I assume you didn't ask because you know they are in use:
a throw
a drill bit holder
Charles
... still thinking....Think
Al Blanco
Posted: Monday, July 07, 2014 4:04:31 AM
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thar wrote:

Also, and I assume you didn't ask because you know they are in use:
a throw
a drill bit holder
Charles
... still thinking....Think


Yes, I know these meanings. And there is something connected with hens, I think :)

Thank you very much for your explanations!
Toffeeapple
Posted: Monday, July 07, 2014 8:16:55 AM

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Are you thinking of the Australian term for hen which is CHOOK?
thar
Posted: Monday, July 07, 2014 8:40:24 AM

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still thinking
...a tickle under the chin.....Whistle
maillady
Posted: Monday, July 07, 2014 10:30:18 AM

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How much wood would a woodchuck chuck,if a woodchuck could chuck wood??
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Monday, July 07, 2014 10:37:37 AM

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A childish word for 'hen's egg' in some parts of Britain is 'chukkie-egg', but I've never heard of a hen being called a 'chuck' or a 'chukkie'.

I've never heard your definitions 1 & 2. Number 3 (provisions) is old cowboy slang, to me.


Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
Luker4
Posted: Monday, July 07, 2014 1:58:20 PM

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[maillady wrote:]
How much wood would a woodchuck chuck,if a woodchuck could chuck wood??


Applause
FounDit
Posted: Monday, July 07, 2014 3:17:23 PM

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Here in the U.S., one definition of "chuck" is a cut of beef, usually not the best quality, and therefore, cheapest. This is generally hamburger meat.

It used to be a reference to food as in "chuck wagons", and the term is still used in trail rides today. It also is slang for throwing something, "Chuck it over here".







A great many people will think they are thinking when they are merely rearranging their prejudices. ~ William James ~
Luker4
Posted: Monday, July 07, 2014 3:48:22 PM

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Chuck Norris is good at chucking
Al Blanco
Posted: Monday, July 07, 2014 4:13:18 PM
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Toffeeapple wrote:
Are you thinking of the Australian term for hen which is CHOOK?



No, I meant this:

chuck3
v.t., v.i.1. to cluck.
n. 2. a clucking sound.

I thought that it has something to do with 'chuckle' :)
Al Blanco
Posted: Monday, July 07, 2014 4:16:22 PM
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By the way, why the second meaning is connected with the first one?


chuck
vb (mainly tr)
1. to throw
2. to pat affectionately, esp under the chin
FounDit
Posted: Monday, July 07, 2014 7:56:09 PM

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From the Online Etymology Dictionary:

chuck (n.1) Look up chuck at Dictionary.com
"piece of wood or meat," 1670s, probably a variant of chock (n.) "block." "Chock and chuck appear to have been originally variants of the same word, which are now somewhat differentiated." Specifically of shoulder meat from early 18c. American English chuck wagon (1880) is from the meat sense.

chuck (n.2) Look up chuck at Dictionary.com
"slight blow under the chin," 1610s, from chuck (v.1). Meaning "a toss, a throw" is from 1862. Related: Chucked; chucking.

chucklehead (n.) Look up chucklehead at Dictionary.com
also chuckle-head, "blockhead, dolt," (18c.), with head (n.), the first element perhaps from chuck (n.1).

chuck (v.1) Look up chuck at Dictionary.com
"to throw," 1590s, variant of chock "give a blow under the chin" (1580s), possibly from French choquer "to shock, strike against," imitative (see shock (n.1)). Related: Chucked; chucking.

upchuck (v.) Look up upchuck at Dictionary.com
"to vomit," by 1960, American English slang, from up (adv.) + chuck (v.) "to throw."


A great many people will think they are thinking when they are merely rearranging their prejudices. ~ William James ~
excaelis
Posted: Monday, July 07, 2014 8:19:01 PM

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" I ate at a diner appropriately named 'Chuck's '." ( Bill Bryson )

Sanity is not statistical
Romany
Posted: Tuesday, July 08, 2014 5:00:33 AM
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"Chuck" used to be a term of affection until around the 18th Century. A husband might call his wife "My little chuck" (this was in England so 'chuck' is not short for 'woodchuck' as it might be in America) - perhaps because she was the person whom he often chucked under the chin. (patted or tickled).
Alice M Toaster
Posted: Tuesday, July 08, 2014 8:28:38 AM

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There is also "chuckhole" which is equivalent to "pothole."

Don't let the past remind you of what you are not now
Romany
Posted: Tuesday, July 08, 2014 11:54:17 AM
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Well, Alice, in Australia there are potholes as big as craters. But if you called them "chuck" holes they'd be full up after a Saturday night at the pub!!
Al Blanco
Posted: Tuesday, July 08, 2014 3:26:54 PM
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FounDit wrote:
From the Online Etymology Dictionary:

chuck (n.1) Look up chuck at Dictionary.com
"piece of wood or meat," 1670s, probably a variant of chock (n.) "block." "Chock and chuck appear to have been originally variants of the same word, which are now somewhat differentiated." Specifically of shoulder meat from early 18c. American English chuck wagon (1880) is from the meat sense.

chuck (n.2) Look up chuck at Dictionary.com
"slight blow under the chin," 1610s, from chuck (v.1). Meaning "a toss, a throw" is from 1862. Related: Chucked; chucking.

chucklehead (n.) Look up chucklehead at Dictionary.com
also chuckle-head, "blockhead, dolt," (18c.), with head (n.), the first element perhaps from chuck (n.1).

chuck (v.1) Look up chuck at Dictionary.com
"to throw," 1590s, variant of chock "give a blow under the chin" (1580s), possibly from French choquer "to shock, strike against," imitative (see shock (n.1)). Related: Chucked; chucking.

upchuck (v.) Look up upchuck at Dictionary.com
"to vomit," by 1960, American English slang, from up (adv.) + chuck (v.) "to throw."


It's great, but a non-native speaker often is not able to know wheather the meaning is in everyday use or it was heard for the last time 300 years ago.
dave freak
Posted: Friday, July 11, 2014 8:04:07 AM
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Can I ask you something, FounDit? Can I address an American a chuck if I want to be friendly, or it is old-fashioned across the pond?

Al Blanco, to learn how words are used you would have to live amongst native speakers. Sometimes, this is not enough I am afraid, because different English speaking people can use a word differently, which is not a rarity.

Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Friday, July 11, 2014 9:26:42 AM

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Ey'up chuck - Lancashire dialect.
'Ello luv - Liverpool dialect/slang
Oh hello, my dear - posh

Hi David - I wouldn't call an American "Chuck" unless his name was Charles. I think it is only local northern English dialect. Even then it is only man to woman, woman to woman, or woman to man - never man to man.


Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
FounDit
Posted: Friday, July 11, 2014 9:43:14 AM

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dave freak wrote:
Can I ask you something, FounDit? Can I address an American a chuck if I want to be friendly, or it is old-fashioned across the pond?

Al Blanco, to learn how words are used you would have to live amongst native speakers. Sometimes, this is not enough I am afraid, because different English speaking people can use a word differently, which is not a rarity.


DragOnspeaker is correct. It would be considered rude to call someone "chuck", if he didn't first tell you it is ok. "Chuck" is short for Charles, but many with that name do not like to be called "chuck".

As to how common the word is used, it is very common when speaking about meat, such as chuck roast, or ground chuck (hamburger).

The only one no longer common is "chuck" as used for a tap under the chin. I've never heard it used like that, and believe it is out of usage now.

Upchuck (vomit), and chuck it here (throw), can be heard in the southern parts of the U.S. I don't know how common those usages are in the northern states, however. I suspect they would be understood, but identify the user as from the south.


A great many people will think they are thinking when they are merely rearranging their prejudices. ~ William James ~
dave freak
Posted: Friday, July 11, 2014 10:15:51 AM
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Thank you very much guys. Now it's clear. One more question for Dragon, though. Does "mint" mean "awesome" Up North in the local twang?

eg This car is mint, isn't this?

A friend of mine is coming to Birmingham tomorrow and he is afraid that he will not understand a word!
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Friday, July 11, 2014 3:15:51 PM

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Hi Dave.

I've only ever heard 'mint' in films, not in real life.

I thought it meant 'very new'.

PS Birmingham is the Midlands, not North.

Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
maillady
Posted: Friday, July 11, 2014 5:15:16 PM

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We say mint in the US. A car in mint condition would be one that has been restored to look "right off the showroom floor".
Romany
Posted: Saturday, July 12, 2014 3:05:25 AM
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Drago - Any place further up from the London/Oxford/Cambridge axis IS "up North"Dancing
leonAzul
Posted: Saturday, July 12, 2014 4:44:12 AM

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FounDit wrote:
dave freak wrote:
Can I ask you something, FounDit? Can I address an American a chuck if I want to be friendly, or it is old-fashioned across the pond?

Al Blanco, to learn how words are used you would have to live amongst native speakers. Sometimes, this is not enough I am afraid, because different English speaking people can use a word differently, which is not a rarity.


DragOnspeaker is correct. It would be considered rude to call someone "chuck", if he didn't first tell you it is ok. "Chuck" is short for Charles, but many with that name do not like to be called "chuck".

As to how common the word is used, it is very common when speaking about meat, such as chuck roast, or ground chuck (hamburger).

The only one no longer common is "chuck" as used for a tap under the chin. I've never heard it used like that, and believe it is out of usage now.

Upchuck (vomit), and chuck it here (throw), can be heard in the southern parts of the U.S. I don't know how common those usages are in the northern states, however. I suspect they would be understood, but identify the user as from the south.


Good observations, yet I would describe the level of understanding by experience and education, rather than by region. (The usage of "chuck under the chin" is definitely generational, IMHO, since I heard it frequently as a youth, but it had become rather quaint and precious during the 1970s.)

I haven't ever heard the combination of words "chuck it here", but rather "chuck it over there". In most contexts, I would understand "chuck it" to mean that something were vehemently discarded, not just carelessly tossed aside.




"Make it go away, Mrs Whatsit," he whispered. "Make it go away. It's evil."
Romany
Posted: Saturday, July 12, 2014 4:50:55 AM
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OK. I'll bite.

What the heck is "double chucking"?

In return I'll proffer the information that "Chuck it here" is a very common way of saying "I'll take it." or "Give it to me" or even "Let me see it" in BE countries.
leonAzul
Posted: Saturday, July 12, 2014 5:20:18 AM

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Romany wrote:
OK. I'll bite.

What the heck is "double chucking"?


Sorry, I confess, I removed that when I realized it might not be more widely understood as a play on words with "double-clutching".

Yet "chuck it here" sounds very much like "sock it to me" to my ear.


"Make it go away, Mrs Whatsit," he whispered. "Make it go away. It's evil."
Romany
Posted: Saturday, July 12, 2014 5:45:39 AM
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Got it. Sort of.

As to the 'sock it to me' analagy? Yeah, well, maybe that's the sexed-up versionDancing
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