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Daemon
Posted: Monday, May 19, 2014 12:00:00 AM
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chagrin

(noun) A keen feeling of mental unease, as of annoyance or embarrassment, caused by failure, disappointment, or a disconcerting event.

Synonyms: mortification, humiliation

Usage: Much to my chagrin, my rival won the election hands down.
Madas
Posted: Monday, May 19, 2014 2:59:06 AM

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I liked Katzenyammer explanation best.Anxious
monamagda
Posted: Monday, May 19, 2014 1:51:09 PM

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The ultimate etymology of the word chagrin, which comes directly to us from French, is considered uncertain by many etymologists. At one time chagrin was thought to be the same word as shagreen, “a leather or skin with a rough surface,” derived from French chagrin. The reasoning was that in French the word for this rough material, which was used to smooth and polish things, was extended to the notion of troubles that fret and annoy a person. It was later decided, however, that the sense “rough leather” and the sense “sorrow” each belonged to a different French word chagrin. Other etymologists have offered an alternative explanation, suggesting that the French word chagrin, “sorrow,” is a loan translation of the German word Katzenjammer, “a hangover from drinking.” A loan translation is a type of borrowing from another language in which the elements of a foreign word, as in Katzen, “cats,” and Jammer, “distress, seediness,” are assumed to be translated literally by corresponding elements in another language, in this case, chat, “cat,” and grigner, “to grimace.” The actual etymology is less colorful, with the word probably going back to a Germanic word, *gramī, meaning “sorrow, trouble.” Chagrin is first recorded in English in 1656 in the now obsolete sense “anxiety, melancholy.”

from Amer Heritage Dict
Pushpendra Sharma
Posted: Thursday, May 22, 2014 6:56:35 AM

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Can u tell e sir how can used the dictionary data on my site?
thar
Posted: Thursday, May 22, 2014 7:11:20 AM

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Interesting that tfd has two pronounciations, BE SHAGrin, and AE shagRIN, but does not have the version which I commonly hear BE speakers use, - shagran' (ie the approximation of a perceived French version)
Luker4
Posted: Thursday, May 22, 2014 12:30:33 PM

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not dissapointed at all Applause
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