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Soren Kierkegaard (1813) Options
Daemon
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Soren Kierkegaard (1813)

Kierkegaard was a Danish philosopher and theologian and is generally considered, along with Friedrich Nietzsche, to be a founder of existentialism. Much of Kierkegaard's work deals with religious problems, as he rejected organized Christianity and emphasized man's moral responsibility and freedom of choice. Kierkegaard stressed the importance of the self and argued that "subjectivity is truth" and "truth is subjectivity." Why did Kierkegaard publish many of his earlier works under pseudonyms? More...
William39
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Søren Kierkegaard

First published Tue Dec 3, 1996; substantive revision Fri Jul 27, 2012
Søren Aabye Kierkegaard (b. 1813, d. 1855) was a profound and prolific writer in the Danish “golden age” of intellectual and artistic activity. His work crosses the boundaries of philosophy, theology, psychology, literary criticism, devotional literature and fiction. Kierkegaard brought this potent mixture of discourses to bear as social critique and for the purpose of renewing Christian faith within Christendom. At the same time he made many original conceptual contributions to each of the disciplines he employed. He is known as the “father of existentialism”, but at least as important are his critiques of Hegel and of the German romantics, his contributions to the development of modernism, his literary experimentation, his vivid re-presentation of biblical figures to bring out their modern relevance, his invention of key concepts which have been explored and redeployed by thinkers ever since, his interventions in contemporary Danish church politics, and his fervent attempts to analyse and revitalise Christian faith.

" very comparable with the reality"!

His theological work focuses on Christian ethics, on the institution of the Church, and on the differences between purely objective proofs of Christianity and the individual's subjective relationship to Jesus Christ,[8] the God-Man, which came through faith.[9][10] Much of his work deals with the art of Christian love. He was extremely critical of the practice of Christianity as a state religion, primarily that of the Church of Denmark. His psychological work explored the emotions and feelings of individuals when faced with life choices.





monamagda
Posted: Monday, May 5, 2014 5:37:17 PM

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Muhammad Answered about: "Can you really experience anything objectively?"

There's a difference between understanding the world objectively (or at least trying to, anyway) and experiencing it through an exclusively objective framework. This is essentially the problem of qualia — the notion that our surroundings can only be observed through the filter of our senses and the cogitations of our minds. Everything you know, everything you've touched, seen, and smelled, has been filtered through any number of physiological and cognitive processes. Subsequently, your subjective experience of the world is unique. In the classic example, the subjective appreciation of the color red may vary from person to person. The only way you could possibly know is if you were to somehow observe the universe from the "conscious lens" of another person in a sort of Being John Malkovich kind of way — not anything we're likely going to be able to accomplish at any stage of our scientific or technological development. Another way of saying all this is that the universe can only be observed through a brain (or potentially a machine mind), and by virtue of that, can only be interpreted subjectively. But given that the universe appears to be coherent and (somewhat) knowable, should we continue to assume that its true objective quality can never be observed or known? It's worth noting that much of Buddhist philosophy is predicated on this fundamental limitation (what they call emptiness), and a complete antithesis to Plato's idealism.

https://answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=20140505053533AAX0Whr
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