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It has been a bitter mortification for me to digest the conclusion that the 'race is for the strong' and that I shall... Options
Daemon
Posted: Sunday, March 2, 2014 12:00:00 AM
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It has been a bitter mortification for me to digest the conclusion that the 'race is for the strong' and that I shall probably do little more but be content to admire the strides others made in science.

Charles Darwin (1809-1882)
Trivium_Discipulus
Posted: Monday, March 3, 2014 12:56:58 AM
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Daemon wrote:
It has been a bitter mortification for me to digest the conclusion that the 'race is for the strong' and that I shall probably do little more but be content to admire the strides others made in science.

Charles Darwin (1809-1882)


Said the guy who believed the various human races represented different stages of human evolution. Of course, his English were at the top and, [the English] God forbid, if the English ever intermarried with the Irish the human race would be lost!

The Descent of Man and Selection in Relation to Sex

Origin of Species by Means of Natural Selection, or the Preservation of Favoured Races in the Struggle for Life

They don't teach that in many schools!

Another take away from Darwin is that he moved "Divine Right of Kings" from the religious realm to the scientific realm... the rabble was oppressed because the King, His Majesty, was simply more evolved and, therefore, ruled over the less evolved peasants.

Yes, I know there was a lot more than that, but that's what you learn in school. I'm only highlighting what is occulted from the general population.


The best way to control the opposition is to finance it. Birds of prey have two wings; the left wing & right wing.
Sattam
Posted: Monday, March 3, 2014 6:06:39 AM

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It has been a bitter mortification for me to digest the conclusion that the 'race is for the strong' and that I shall probably do little more but be content to admire the strides others made in science - What does this actually mean?
youme
Posted: Monday, March 3, 2014 6:38:46 AM
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If I'm not wrong this guy said that evolution happens to all species including humans, well if we suppose he was right then after more than 200 years the human kind evolved a lot, which means I would say that I'm a better version of what he was, so I would say simply that my old version was wrong and I'm right :)
And by the way... Chimps are looking forward to becoming humans as Mr Darwin promised them lol
peaty
Posted: Monday, March 3, 2014 7:34:59 AM
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Trivium, I think you have completly missed the meaning of race in this quote. "The race is for the strong" is using the analogy of a running race: the winner will be the fastest, or strongest. It is a restatement of "survival of the fittest", but in the latter phrase "fittest" does not mean "in the best physical condition", or "healthiest", it means "most likely to fit in", that is, best suited to the current conditions.

The quotation is actully quite a modest one. Darwin is saying that he has made a small contribution to science, but that most of the significant work will be done by others who follow on from him, so he must sit back and "admire the strides" taken by others. However, the "bitter mortification" means that he is not altogether happy about this.

Less is more (more or less).
Bully_rus
Posted: Monday, March 3, 2014 9:10:41 AM
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Daemon wrote:
It has been a bitter mortification for me to digest the conclusion that the 'race is for the strong' and that I shall probably do little more but be content to admire the strides others made in science.

Charles Darwin (1809-1882)

For better or bitter, admiration is preferable to mortification and presumably more healthy too.
Marguerite
Posted: Monday, March 3, 2014 10:48:28 AM

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That Darwin would think himself as not a contender in the field of science is like Jesse Owens thinking he didn't change how we view Olympic history.
adrian garcia
Posted: Monday, March 3, 2014 11:10:01 AM

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Reading the comments I conclude that the quote is being completely misunderstood by some people. In the context of the quote, and knowing a bit about Darwin's shy personality, "race" refers to the competition of ideas going on at his time. He was not sure he wanted to publish his work; therefore, he would be happy watching other scientist be first to publish and get credit for the discovery. In Darwin's time, religious believe had a strong hold on people's mind, and discussions were not for the feeble character; debating was to the death, sometimes not only literally. With all this in mind, who could blame him?
Trivium_Discipulus
Posted: Monday, March 3, 2014 11:41:03 AM
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peaty wrote:
Trivium, I think you have completly missed the meaning of race in this quote. "The race is for the strong" is using the analogy of a running race: the winner will be the fastest, or strongest. It is a restatement of "survival of the fittest", but in the latter phrase "fittest" does not mean "in the best physical condition", or "healthiest", it means "most likely to fit in", that is, best suited to the current conditions.

The quotation is actully quite a modest one. Darwin is saying that he has made a small contribution to science, but that most of the significant work will be done by others who follow on from him, so he must sit back and "admire the strides" taken by others. However, the "bitter mortification" means that he is not altogether happy about this.


I wasn't referring to "race" in the quote, rather, to the content of the books I listed.

Are you unaware that he argued that the English were the pinnacle of human evolution and that interbreeding with the depths of human evolution, the Irish in his eyes (seriously, I couldn't make this up!), would destroy humanity!

If so, then schooling did its job.

I recommend reading the original source material and not letting a special interest financed intermediary interpret between you and the words in the actual book.

Ask yourself this question - By what mechanism would man "descend" in his book "The Descent of Man?"

And then answer it by reading his book on the subject.

The best way to control the opposition is to finance it. Birds of prey have two wings; the left wing & right wing.
karia h
Posted: Monday, March 3, 2014 11:53:09 AM
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For me, he is talking about who gets to dominate what, survival of the fittest and the fittest getting dominion over things including longevity. Probably it is a pain for him to agree to this conclusion since he wants to be able to come up with a much higher understanding of things; and he is not to just sit and wait for others to discover a much higher truth but he has to discover that himself. I gues this is a case of being torn between science and spirituality.
Verbatim
Posted: Monday, March 3, 2014 2:21:22 PM
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Daemon wrote:
It has been a bitter mortification for me to digest the conclusion that the 'race is for the strong' and that I shall probably do little more but be content to admire the strides others made in science.

Charles Darwin (1809-1882)


The original title of Darwin's work: " On the origin of species by means of natural selection, or the preservation of favoured races in the struggle for life. London: John Murray. [1st ed.] Text Image PDF F373" (1859) seems to indicate the meaning of "race": as species.

This may be of some import:

""In October 1838, that is, fifteen months after I had begun my systematic enquiry, I happened to read for amusement Malthus on Population, and being well prepared to appreciate the struggle for existence which everywhere goes on from long-continued observation of the habits of animals and plants, it at once struck me that under these circumstances favourable variations would tend to be, preserved, and unfavourable ones to be destroyed. The result of this would be the formation of new species. Here, then, I had at last got a theory by which to work; but I was so anxious to avoid prejudice, that I determined not for some time to write even the briefest sketch of it.""
— Charles Darwin
In Charles Darwin and Francis Darwin (ed.), Charles Darwin: His Life Told in an Autobiographical Chapter, and in a Selected Series of His Published Letters (1892), 40.
Science quotes on: | Thomas Robert Malthus (12)
Pieter_Hove
Posted: Monday, March 3, 2014 2:22:21 PM

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Bully_rus wrote:
Daemon wrote:
It has been a bitter mortification for me to digest the conclusion that the 'race is for the strong' and that I shall probably do little more but be content to admire the strides others made in science.

Charles Darwin (1809-1882)

For better or bitter, admiration is preferable to mortification and presumably more healthy too.

Bully Rus, I think you are smarter than your nickname suggests. Dancing Applause Angel
Apedo Jeomey Bright
Posted: Monday, March 3, 2014 4:59:55 PM

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I just lost of comment after,I read through the post by my senior collegue member.it is great to be here.
Absurdicuss
Posted: Monday, March 3, 2014 7:41:47 PM

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I just spent five fascinating hours listening to the John Taylor Gatto interview, Ultimate History Lesson.

What a brilliant intellect and historian of the advent of the Prussian schooling technique: creating an automaton populace of wage slaves.

Thanks Triv.

I have finally begun the Trivium Education course.


*************************


The fabulously wealthy Darwin family was of highest English breeding, perched comfortably within the gilded aristocracy. Charlie was an elitist racist of highest order.

If you don't believe that then read his books.




"Now" is the eternal present.
kenturner1
Posted: Monday, March 3, 2014 8:39:42 PM

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Was that some sort of concession statement or was he just being humble?

**DISCLAIMER**
Gayle48
Posted: Tuesday, March 4, 2014 12:17:06 AM
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But I live in KANSAS with primates on the school board mucking about with the tale that has been told. I am quite upset someone pinched my book on the CAT. What was his name? The biography of Darwin's cat that sailed with him on the Beagle is the title. his name that is. Does anyone know? This old girl is put out by the numbskulls directing biological traffic to the children here on the plains. Actually it has many hills. I would like my cat bio back. It might have been one of the dogs. Hmmm AND Miriam Anderson wrote a book about her black cat Snoopy. Is it in print. Wow and she traveled with Albert Einstein, to dine, wine and have access to those horrid restaurants up north. I can not proof read this well, my vision is becoming worse and it is double at that.
Verbatim
Posted: Wednesday, March 5, 2014 2:11:08 PM
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Natural selection has it all wrong: It’s not the feeble in mankind who threaten the species and its domain with extinction, but the evil-minded of the strong kind, adapting, surviving, dominating… unfittingly. (I know, that's not in the dictionary, it fits though.)
Absurdicuss
Posted: Thursday, March 6, 2014 6:47:46 PM

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Whatever it is, whatever happens, whatever we do, it's all "Evolution". And evolution will sort it out. After all, evolution anticipates, and simultaneously adjusts to prevailing conditions that it created in the first place.

"Now" is the eternal present.
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