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Get off my cloud or get off of my cloud , do what you want I don't care but just GET OFF! Options
jagh55
Posted: Wednesday, December 16, 2009 11:04:03 PM
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Joined: 6/26/2009
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What's the difference between "get off of" and "get off"?
Why do some people write "of" and some don't? Is it by choice?
Is there a rule that says you can or can not use it if you want?

For example, "get off my bed" and "get off of my bed": which one is correct. I've heard both many times so I'm kind of confusedd'oh!

Is it wrong to decide someone is such a great person because they're so much like you?
moorwood
Posted: Thursday, December 17, 2009 12:17:06 AM
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"Get off of" is just plain wrong.

I like your eleven facts. Why did you say there were ten? Now you are checking.
JayJay
Posted: Thursday, December 17, 2009 4:29:50 AM

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The word "of" is just unnecessary verbiage in your phrase like the word "just" used in this sentence.
MarySM
Posted: Thursday, December 17, 2009 8:37:17 AM

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I agree that the word "of" is unnecessary. However, we often add unnecessary words in English. Why do I see knowledgeable writers use the word "Had" twice in a row? They will write something like "Mary had had a very bad day." Why is the second "had" necessary? Anyone know?

"He who never made a mistake never made a discovery." Samuel Smiles
Jyrkkä Jätkä
Posted: Thursday, December 17, 2009 8:41:47 AM

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MarySM wrote:
I agree that the word "of" is unnecessary. However, we often add unnecessary words in English. Why do I see knowledgeable writers use the word "Had" twice in a row? They will write something like "Mary had had a very bad day." Why is the second "had" necessary? Anyone know?


Mary's day had been bad so far.


In the beginning there was nothing, which exploded.
JayJay
Posted: Thursday, December 17, 2009 7:44:43 PM

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I have definitely seen "had had" written as you've mentioned, although I would never use it.
Unnecessary verbiage can be difficult to avoid when insufficient time is spent proofreading.
I rarely spend time editing unless I am writing something important and I think that is probably true with most people.
jagh55
Posted: Thursday, December 17, 2009 7:56:26 PM
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Joined: 6/26/2009
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moorwood wrote:
"Get off of" is just plain wrong.

I like your eleven facts. Why did you say there were ten? Now you are checking.


Hahahahaha Angel

Applause Applause Applause Applause Applause

Straight to the point! I like that, thanks!Drool

Is it wrong to decide someone is such a great person because they're so much like you?
jagh55
Posted: Thursday, December 17, 2009 8:01:25 PM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 6/26/2009
Posts: 312
Neurons: 920
JayJay wrote:
The word "of" is just unnecessary verbiage in your phrase like the word "just" used in this sentence.

Thanks a lot :)

You can't say that? I've heard many times people use "just" in their sentence.Eh? Think
Do you mean I can use it when speaking but NOT when writing?
You're saying that not using "just" would be better?

Is it wrong to decide someone is such a great person because they're so much like you?
nooblet
Posted: Thursday, December 17, 2009 8:14:58 PM

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MarySM wrote:
I agree that the word "of" is unnecessary. However, we often add unnecessary words in English. Why do I see knowledgeable writers use the word "Had" twice in a row? They will write something like "Mary had had a very bad day." Why is the second "had" necessary? Anyone know?


I use "had had" in certain situations, exactly like the one you quoted. I am no expert in grammar, but I will try to explain why I use it.

I am pretty sure that "Mary had had a very bad day" is in a different tense than "Mary had a very bad day."

For instance, if you continue the sentence like so: "Mary had a very bad day and is in a sour mood because of it." Notice that the first part of the sentence is past tense and then moves to present tense. This sounds like you are directly telling someone else about Mary, and fits into conversation pretty normally.

Adding a second had into the previous sentence would be incorrect (to my knowledge), but you could change it to "Mary had had a very bad day and was still in a sour mood because of it." I am pretty sure a single "had" would not be proper for this sentence. I really don't know the differences between the tenses, but I know that narratives tend to follow the version in this paragraph, whereas conversations tend to follow the version in the previous paragraph. I know it has to do with tense, and that certain tenses are rarely used in conversation, whereas they may be quite ordinary in narrative works.
moorwood
Posted: Friday, December 18, 2009 12:52:21 AM
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Reminds me of the old nonsense: John, where Jack had had "had", had had "had had". "Had had" had had the teacher's approval.
kingfisher
Posted: Friday, December 18, 2009 10:37:34 AM
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Nooblet is correct. There are situations in which "had had" is appropriate.


I don't think "get off of my bed" is grammatically incorrect. I believe the choice between "get off my bed" and "get off of my bed" is stylistic, rather than grammatical.
JayJay
Posted: Saturday, December 19, 2009 4:42:40 AM

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Location: United States
jagh55 wrote:
JayJay wrote:
The word "of" is just unnecessary verbiage in your phrase like the word "just" used in this sentence.

Thanks a lot :)

You can't say that? I've heard many times people use "just" in their sentence.Eh? Think
Do you mean I can use it when speaking but NOT when writing?
You're saying that not using "just" would be better?


It isn't necessarily wrong, but it isn't required to complete the sentence. Even using "had had" is acceptable, but I wont use it because it sounds awkward.
Romany
Posted: Saturday, December 19, 2009 10:59:18 AM
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I very rarely reply to these kinds of questions as I usually think that gg and others do it so much more ably and clearly. But, as they aren't here: -

The Past Perfect tense is made by using "had" and the past tense of a verb. So, in the Narrative form for example, we would say: "Mary had danced the night away." a form with which we are all familiar.

If we wanted to enlarge uon this we could say
"She had had a marvelous time."
This would not be unnecessary verbiage - we are simply continuing to employ the Past Perfect - "had" with the past tense of the the verb which, in this case, happens to be the verb "to have". That gives us the double "had".

If we were to drop one of the "had"s we would be changing the tense from Past Perfect to Simple Past - or at least alternating between tenses - which would be rather confusing.

I don't find this form awkward in the least - and I think most peop;e don't even notice it in the oral form. Perhaps it seems awkward in the written form because two identical words together might look like a typo?
Isaac Samuel
Posted: Saturday, December 19, 2009 4:02:53 PM

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Joined: 4/2/2009
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I piggy back had when I say "I had had my hair cut" and "I had had my car worked on" in past perfect, when the
performer is other than I.( me?)
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