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the camel does not see its hump Options
Khalid Sami
Posted: Saturday, February 8, 2014 7:12:02 PM
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Hello everybody


الجمل لا يرى حدبته

The saying above means "the camel does not see its hump".
It refers to someone who is always finding faults in other persons ,disqualifying them, puting them down and criticizing them perkly, even if he has the same defauts(bad qualities) himself and even more worse than the ones he find and defame in them.

I’m looking for the equivalent of this saying in English. would you help please.


Thank you very much.
peaty
Posted: Saturday, February 8, 2014 8:21:58 PM
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Usually represented by this quote from the New Testament: And why beholdest thou the mote that is in thy brother's eye, but considerest not the beam that is in thine own eye? Other translations are available.


Less is more (more or less).
HasmukhDoshi
Posted: Sunday, February 9, 2014 1:22:25 AM
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Everything looks yellow to a jaundiced eye.

Next to trying and winning, the best thing is trying and failing.
Professor
Posted: Sunday, February 9, 2014 1:29:00 AM

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Khalid Sami wrote:
Hello everybody


الجمل لا يرى حدبته

The saying above means "the camel does not see its hump".
It refers to someone who is always finding faults in other persons ,disqualifying them, puting them down and criticizing them perkly, even if he has the same defauts(bad qualities) himself and even more worse than the ones he find and defame in them.

I’m looking for the equivalent of this saying in English. would you help please.


Thank you very much.


English has several similar sayings. "Why do you see the speck that is in your brother's eye, but do not notice the log that is in your own?"

"You reveal your character by what you do with what you have."
Briton
Posted: Sunday, February 9, 2014 7:04:22 AM

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I don't think most people today would use a Biblical quotation, and "everything looks yellow to a jaundiced eye" means something a little different.

The nearest I can think of is: 'People who live in glass houses shouldn't throw stones".

People who are blind to their own faults shouldn't find fault with others.

Kerry.P
Posted: Monday, February 10, 2014 1:51:34 AM

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I agree with Briton.

The other sayings are either more than 2000 years old or do not convey the same thing.
Jyrkkä Jätkä
Posted: Monday, February 10, 2014 1:54:52 AM

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Pata kattilaa soimaa - The pot calling the kettle black.


In the beginning there was nothing, which exploded.
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Monday, February 10, 2014 3:19:07 AM

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Hey JJ! - that's one of my mother's 'sayings' - an old Lancashire phrase:

"Th' kettle calling th' pot 'Sootybottom'."


Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
rogermue
Posted: Monday, February 10, 2014 3:46:48 AM

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Nice saying, Dragon.
I know: That's the pot calling the kettle black.
srirr
Posted: Monday, February 10, 2014 4:33:04 AM

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I have heard The pot calling the kettle black.

In my language, we have a saying that a ladle with holes accuses a filter of containing so many holes.

The ladle with holes has a special name in my language


and so has this filter (used to clean grains, pulses).


We are responsible for what we are, and whatever we wish ourselves to be, we have the power to make ourselves. ~ Swami Vivekanand
Barely literate
Posted: Monday, February 10, 2014 1:25:18 PM

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I would like to know what the native speakers call those things inserted by Stirr in his last post.

1st one: Ladle with hole?
2nd one: Sieve(I think) Correct?
Alice M Toaster
Posted: Monday, February 10, 2014 2:20:13 PM

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Here, we call it a "slotted spoon."

♫♪Don't suffocate on your own hate♪♫
Jyrkkä Jätkä
Posted: Monday, February 10, 2014 2:25:34 PM

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skimmer and sieve

(and it's srirr, not stirr ;-)



In the beginning there was nothing, which exploded.
Briton
Posted: Monday, February 10, 2014 7:29:27 PM

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Here, we call it a strainer. A slotted spoon is a spoon with slits/slots in.

We, like JJ, call the other a sieve.
srirr
Posted: Tuesday, February 11, 2014 1:25:59 AM

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Thanks for the words. I was not familiar with skimmer.

In fact, for the other item, I was actually not trying to refer to sieve. It is more or less similar to a sieve, however both have different uses in the kitchen here.
I could find a more appropriate image now. It is actually

Do we have a different word for this in English?

We are responsible for what we are, and whatever we wish ourselves to be, we have the power to make ourselves. ~ Swami Vivekanand
Jyrkkä Jätkä
Posted: Tuesday, February 11, 2014 1:34:44 AM

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colander


In the beginning there was nothing, which exploded.
srirr
Posted: Tuesday, February 11, 2014 1:46:08 AM

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Thanks JJ.

I sometimes feel that we as a second language learner, miss to learn the correct terms for common things. I personally do not use English of commonly used spices, grains etc. In the market or advertisements too, the local language is preferred even when describing everything else in English.

We are responsible for what we are, and whatever we wish ourselves to be, we have the power to make ourselves. ~ Swami Vivekanand
Jyrkkä Jätkä
Posted: Tuesday, February 11, 2014 1:57:27 AM

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You're right, srirr. There are lots of common words for common things, like kitchen utensils, you only learn if you need them.

Was it Matthew or Luke who wrote this?
"It is easier for a camel to go through the sieve, than for us to learn English."
(just to lead us back on topic ;-)


In the beginning there was nothing, which exploded.
Ebenezer Son
Posted: Tuesday, February 11, 2014 6:58:16 AM
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Drag0nspeaker wrote:
Hey JJ! - that's one of my mother's 'sayings' - an old Lancashire phrase:

"Th' kettle calling th' pot 'Sootybottom'."



Hi Dragon, I hope sootybottom means (blackbottom)


I know only one thing - that is that I know nothing.
thar
Posted: Tuesday, February 11, 2014 8:03:44 AM

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Yes. It is a funny holdover that people will use that saying now, even though a kettle has changed meaning, it is usually electric, and a pot is heated on a stove with nice clean-burning gas. Hardly a black pot or sooty-bottomed kettle in sight!



dragon - I love that one by the way.

Although it does bring up some strange images....



Is it just me, or does he looked slightly shocked! Whistle Whistle

Ebenezer, in case you don't know, the puppets are called Sooty and Sweep.
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Tuesday, February 11, 2014 8:46:50 AM

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True - I occasionally see a black pot - but that's only when I forget that I put something on cooking.

I think that what we used to call "town gas" - which was extracted from local coal - was a lot 'sootier' than the modern gas (though it has the same smell).
We did have a coal cooking suite in the fireplace, but never used it. A bit less 'fancy' than this one - only one oven.



Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
Khalid Sami
Posted: Tuesday, February 11, 2014 11:05:19 AM
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Thank you so very much everybody.
Ebenezer Son
Posted: Wednesday, February 12, 2014 12:58:00 PM
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[quote=thar]Yes. It is a funny holdover that people will use that saying now, even though a kettle has changed meaning, it is usually electric, and a pot is heated on a stove with nice clean-burning gas. Hardly a black pot or sooty-bottomed kettle in sight!



dragon - I love that one by the way.

Although it does bring up some strange images....


Thar, good poppies, but I will name the yellow [delta] and the other [paddy]

I know only one thing - that is that I know nothing.
Ebenezer Son
Posted: Wednesday, February 12, 2014 12:59:31 PM
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thar wrote:
Yes. It is a funny holdover that people will use that saying now, even though a kettle has changed meaning, it is usually electric, and a pot is heated on a stove with nice clean-burning gas. Hardly a black pot or sooty-bottomed kettle in sight!



dragon - I love that one by the way.

Although it does bring up some strange images....



Is it just me, or does he looked slightly shocked! Whistle Whistle

Ebenezer, in case you don't know, the puppets are called Sooty and Sweep.


I know only one thing - that is that I know nothing.
Ebenezer Son
Posted: Wednesday, February 12, 2014 1:01:15 PM
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thar wrote:
Yes. It is a funny holdover that people will use that saying now, even though a kettle has changed meaning, it is usually electric, and a pot is heated on a stove with nice clean-burning gas. Hardly a black pot or sooty-bottomed kettle in sight!



dragon - I love that one by the way.

Although it does bring up some strange images....



Is it just me, or does he looked slightly shocked! Whistle Whistle

Ebenezer, in case you don't know, the puppets are called Sooty and Sweep.


I know only one thing - that is that I know nothing.
Kirk Stephens
Posted: Wednesday, February 12, 2014 1:21:17 PM

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Wow. This thread certainly got hijacked from the original question.
Jyrkkä Jätkä
Posted: Wednesday, February 12, 2014 2:34:12 PM

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It happens quite often in this forum, that after the original question is well solved and answered, the topic continues in its own serpentine paths. Usually in a lore expanding way, actually.



In the beginning there was nothing, which exploded.
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