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Prolonged Viewing of Disaster Coverage Might Cause PTSD Options
Daemon
Posted: Sunday, December 15, 2013 12:00:00 AM
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Prolonged Viewing of Disaster Coverage Might Cause PTSD

Prolonged exposure to media coverage about a traumatic event could be harmful to one's mental health. People who spent more than six hours a day viewing or reading items related to the Boston Marathon bombings in the week after the attacks showed signs of acute stress. Such people were in fact more likely to experience acute stress than those who were actually present at the bombings or who knew someone who had been there. Acute stress is a condition characterized by a cluster of dissociative and anxiety symptoms that develop following exposure to an extremely traumatic event. If these symptoms persist for long enough, sufferers may be diagnosed with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). More...
FounDit
Posted: Sunday, December 15, 2013 9:58:15 AM

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"People should be aware there is no psychological benefit to repeated [voluntary..FD] exposure to pictures of horror," she said. Roxane Cohen Silver professor of psychology at the University of California Irvine

WELL, DUH!! YA THINK?

I can have sympathy for people who suffer through no fault of their own, but little to none for those who are members of the self-inflicted group.

It is a pitiable circumstance that some people find so great a need for significance in their lives that they obsess over disaster in order to make themselves feel a part of it; as if being a part of a great, or significant event makes them great or significant by association.


We should look to the past to learn from it, not destroy our future because of it — FounDit
Hope2
Posted: Sunday, December 15, 2013 10:55:07 AM

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FounDit wrote:
"People should be aware there is no psychological benefit to repeated [voluntary..FD] exposure to pictures of horror," she said. Roxane Cohen Silver professor of psychology at the University of California Irvine

WELL, DUH!! YA THINK?

I can have sympathy for people who suffer through no fault of their own, but little to none for those who are members of the self-inflicted group.

It is a pitiable circumstance that some people find so great a need for significance in their lives that they obsess over disaster in order to make themselves feel a part of it; as if being a part of a great, or significant event makes them great or significant by association.


I agree FD. More trouble is caused in the world by people wanting to feel important.

Most of the trouble in the world is caused by people wanting to be important. T. S. Eliot
MTC
Posted: Sunday, December 15, 2013 9:56:10 PM
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Joined: 1/18/2011
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The article raises the issue of addictive behavior and personal responsibility. Studies have shown some people are inherently more susceptible to addictions than others. Once someone from the vulnerable group gets started on an addictive behavior, it can become difficult or impossible to stop. There is abundant literature on the subject. In my opinion,repeatedly watching traumatic scenes freely available in the media including the Internet can also be addictive, or at the very least a habit. Some will see prolonged viewng of disaster coverge as a failure of will power, and condem those who succumb acordingly. Others will see the viewers as possible victims of addiction. The usual battle lines will be drawn between the warring philosophical camps.

The motivation to watch disaster scenes repeatedly could be more than the urge to feel important. It might also be considered a human, empathetic desire to share the suffering of the disaster victims. Unfortunately for the vulnerable group, this may backfire in the form of an addiction.

excaelis
Posted: Sunday, December 15, 2013 11:44:48 PM

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People who spent more than six hours a day viewing or reading items related to the Boston Marathon bombings in the week after the attacks need to be more involved in their own lives.

Sanity is not statistical
Hope2
Posted: Monday, December 16, 2013 8:51:33 AM

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Location: Toronto, Ontario, Canada
I agree Exy. They could spend time here. Lol

Most of the trouble in the world is caused by people wanting to be important. T. S. Eliot
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