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Pride is one of the seven deadly sins; but it cannot be the pride of a mother in her children, for that is a compound of two... Options
Daemon
Posted: Sunday, December 8, 2013 12:00:00 AM
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Pride is one of the seven deadly sins; but it cannot be the pride of a mother in her children, for that is a compound of two cardinal virtues—faith and hope.

Charles Dickens (1812-1870)
Kushal Mahajan
Posted: Sunday, December 8, 2013 5:27:18 AM

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Why the use of word "cardinal" in this quote ?
Bully_rus
Posted: Sunday, December 8, 2013 7:00:11 AM
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Sin is nothing more than a virtue taken to extremes - out of proportion, out of context. Besides, you cannot grant too much credit puma for speed or elephant for size and weight. It's natural and thus in some sense effortless.
Verbatim
Posted: Sunday, December 8, 2013 2:33:33 PM
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Kushal Mahajan wrote:
Why the use of word "cardinal" in this quote ?


Cardinal, adjective: "1. Of foremost importance; paramount: a cardinal rule; cardinal sins." http://www.thefreedictionary.com/cardinal
Verbatim
Posted: Sunday, December 8, 2013 5:52:25 PM
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Daemon wrote:
Pride is one of the seven deadly sins; but it cannot be the pride of a mother in her children, for that is a compound of two cardinal virtues—faith and hope.

Charles Dickens (1812-1870)


In writing "Nicholas Nickleby" Dickens was probably thinking of the "Theological Virtues", of which Faith and Hope are the first two, by the Grace of, God-given virtues.
Charity, or love, is the third.

But pride in one's labors, the activity required of most of us to be self-sufficient, that cannot be a deadly sin. That pride has in its makeup one of the four
"Cardinal Virtues", which is Fortitude, the only one said by Christian doctrine to be also a gift by the Holy Spirit in that it upholds Faith.
It would also be hard to conceive that after having been relegated to earning a living by the sweat of their brow, those proud of obedience in such labors
could be held in contempt for the deadly sin of pride as well. Of course, some of us do not earn a living by the sweat of their brow--the meritocracy that is--rather
by the graceless "exertion" of the brains behind it, and there is pride in that. Shame on you

More on the Cardinal Virtues and their origin of natural morality: http://catholicism.about.com/od/beliefsteachings/tp/Cardinal_Virtues.htm
MTC
Posted: Sunday, December 8, 2013 7:29:28 PM
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Verbatim wrote:

But pride in one's labors, the activity required of most of us to be self-sufficient, that cannot be a deadly sin. That pride has in its makeup one of the four
"Cardinal Virtues", which is Fortitude, the only one said by Christian doctrine to be also a gift by the Holy Spirit in that it upholds Faith.


.......................................................................................................................................................

"Eliminating mass unemployment was the Führer’s first task. He called on the entire German nation to begin a massive battle of work, the success of which is visible to us all today."

"The Winterhilfswerk is the most beautiful expression of the new German people’s community. It is not the work of a small group of rich people. No, each German, all of us, rich and poor, manual laborers, farmers, and city-dwellers cooperate in fulfilling the Führer’s will: No German may be hungry or cold!"

Nazi Propaganda

(http://www.calvin.edu/academic/cas/gpa/danken.htm)

Miriam...
Posted: Sunday, December 8, 2013 8:53:39 PM

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I often wondered, and have spent considerable time meditating on why Hope is considered one of the three great virtues of Christianity. I can understand Faith--and I can certainly understand Charity-- but, Hope is a great mystery. I remember listening with bowed head and pricked up ears as a nun during religion class told us how Thomas a Kempis, when buried a live, tried to claw himself out of his casket; and therefore could not be canonized a saint. For it was determined that he had lost "hope" by trying to save himself. What could one possibly hope for in a situation such as this? Does hope have some other mystical meaning that only Christians understand? Was Thomas a Kempis suppose to have lost his trust--confidence--his belief that God knew what he was doing by having him locked up in his casket? Did he panic by not having any great faith in a "brighter tomorrow" and seemingly did not surrender to Gods will?

Below I have listed all the entries for hope in an attempt to understand its meaning. Perhaps someone would like to express their thoughts about this.

hope (hp)
v. hoped, hop·ing, hopes
v.intr.
1. To wish for something with expectation of its fulfillment.
2. Archaic To have confidence; trust.
v.tr.
1. To look forward to with confidence or expectation: We hope that our children will be successful.
2. To expect and desire. See Synonyms at expect.
n.
1. A wish or desire accompanied by confident expectation of its fulfillment.
2. Something that is hoped for or desired: Success is our hope.
3. One that is a source of or reason for hope: the team's only hope for victory.
4. often Hope Christianity The theological virtue defined as the desire and search for a future good, difficult but not impossible to attain with God's help.
5. Archaic Trust; confidence.
Idiom:
hope against hope
To hope with little reason or justification.
[Middle English hopen, from Old English hopian.]
hoper n.
The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition copyright ©2000 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Updated in 2009. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.
hope [həʊp]
n
1. (sometimes plural) a feeling of desire for something and confidence in the possibility of its fulfilment his hope for peace was justified their hopes were dashed
2. a reasonable ground for this feeling there is still hope
3. a person or thing that gives cause for hope
4. a thing, situation, or event that is desired my hope is that prices will fall
not a hope or some hope used ironically to express little confidence that expectations will be fulfilled
vb
1. (tr; takes a clause as object or an infinitive) to desire (something) with some possibility of fulfilment we hope you can come I hope to tell you
2. (intr; often foll by for) to have a wish (for a future event, situation, etc.)
3. (tr; takes a clause as object) to trust, expect, or believe we hope that this is satisfactory
[Old English hopa; related to Old Frisian hope, Dutch hoop, Middle High German hoffe]
Verbatim
Posted: Sunday, December 8, 2013 9:06:38 PM
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Miriam: Perhaps this link would be helpful, http://catholicism.about.com/od/beliefsteachings/p/Hope.htm

My thoughts on hope are more secular; there must be hope for us here, while in transit to eternal salvation.

Hope, as a weak desire of the heart, may be the stimulant to exercise the mind in acquiring little by little the strength of will.
Hope has no expectations--even less demands of certainty--rather a protracted wish becoming consistent in a general fashion,
not mindful of previous disappointments. From a modest start does hope accumulate the resolution of the will, the latter inconceivable without the former.
Hope turns the inveterate pessimist into a moderate optimist.
MTC
Posted: Monday, December 9, 2013 2:40:47 AM
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Posted: Wednesday, September 14, 2011 9:00:00 PM

Hope is a leaf-joy, which may be beaten out to a great extension, like gold.

Francis Bacon (1561-1626)




"Hope" is the thing with feathers - (314)
BY EMILY DICKINSON

“Hope” is the thing with feathers -
That perches in the soul -
And sings the tune without the words -
And never stops - at all -

And sweetest - in the Gale - is heard -
And sore must be the storm -
That could abash the little Bird
That kept so many warm -

I’ve heard it in the chillest land -
And on the strangest Sea -
Yet - never - in Extremity,
It asked a crumb - of me.

pedro
Posted: Monday, December 9, 2013 7:13:53 AM

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'I'm too old for pride, greed, and lust,
And gluttony's for the robust.
Of envy, I tire;
I can live without ire.
But sloth is an absolute must!'

anon


All good ideas arrive by chance- Max Ernst
Bully_rus
Posted: Monday, December 9, 2013 8:01:56 AM
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to Miriam...

As a part of the whole miracle, it is more suitable for practice (toddler-like) than any logical proofs, which any wonder defy. Against all odds just like a hero...
Miriam...
Posted: Monday, December 9, 2013 8:18:41 AM

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Thank you, dear members, for your helpful thoughts, links and poems, which I shall hold close to my heart.
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