The Free Dictionary  
mailing list For webmasters
Welcome Guest Forum Search | Active Topics | Members

Trust/hope + may/might Options
Al Blanco
Posted: Saturday, November 14, 2009 9:31:54 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 10/26/2009
Posts: 240
Neurons: 1,688
My grammar book says that 'may/might' may be used after verbs 'trust' and 'hope'.

I trust that the proposal may meet with approval. I hope she may succeed
I trust that the proposal might meet with approval. I hope she might succeed

An American told me that Americans would use 'will' instead of 'may/might' in these sentences. Is such using OK in British English nowadays or this is obsolete in Britain too?
Articulate Dreamer
Posted: Saturday, November 14, 2009 12:25:54 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/16/2009
Posts: 12,367
Neurons: 90,331
Location: Bangalore, Karnataka, India
The American's suggestion is, as they say, 'spot on'! I trust you will find a better grammar book, Al.

"...hold infinity in the palm of your hand and eternity in an hour"
Nibbles
Posted: Saturday, November 14, 2009 7:06:04 PM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 6/3/2009
Posts: 434
not sure it matters, really, the use of may, might and will. Nor do I think an American would prefer one usage over another, other than personal preference or style, or if they are more adept at smithing words, perhaps depending upon context. 'May' to many is nearly as assertive as 'might', in some cases more so, the use of 'will' and 'shall' are more assertive, 'shall' probably being the most assertive in many instances. I guess it is more a matter of how analretentive one is regarding which word one may choose, or how they might use them, or which word one shall choose according their will. You can probably get away with any of them, in most circumstances, may be.
Al Blanco
Posted: Sunday, November 15, 2009 2:56:31 PM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 10/26/2009
Posts: 240
Neurons: 1,688
Articulate Dreamer, Nibbles, thanks a lot.
Articulate Dreamer, I wouldn't say that this grammar book is bad. I think that the author of it, A.S.Hornby, is one of the best. The only problem is that it was written 60 years ago :)
I have modern ones too, but none of them draws a good distinguish between constructions which are used in American and British English. Plus, I believe that one should know archaic constructions too – they are used in many old good books- but, of course, it is always interesting to know whether a construction is obsolete or not.
Users browsing this topic
Guest


Forum Jump
You cannot post new topics in this forum.
You cannot reply to topics in this forum.
You cannot delete your posts in this forum.
You cannot edit your posts in this forum.
You cannot create polls in this forum.
You cannot vote in polls in this forum.

Main Forum RSS : RSS
Forum Terms and Guidelines | Privacy policy | Copyright © 2008-2019 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.