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Are 'vitrified' and 'vitreous' same / sililar words or conjugations of each other Options
perfection161
Posted: Wednesday, November 13, 2013 11:01:55 PM
Rank: Newbie

Joined: 8/6/2012
Posts: 23
Neurons: 80
These are words used when it comes to describing the finish and quality of china and crockery.
I would like to know whether these words are conjugations of one another and what they mean exactly individually)

My understanding:
Vitreous: glassy translucent finish on a surface such as porcelain
Vitrified: non-porousity of a ceramic due to the processing it has undergone

So can a vitrified ceramic ware not be vitreous

Thanks
Shivanand
Posted: Wednesday, November 13, 2013 11:18:02 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/2/2011
Posts: 7,891
Neurons: 217,539
Location: Bangalore, Karnataka, India
Both these words are inter-related. Vitreous surface is what you get when you VITRIFY a porcelain/china substrate. By virtue of being glassy, vitreous coat on a porcelain surface reduces its porosity.


Cheers!

कर्मण्येवाधिकारस्ते मा फलेषु कदाचन। मा कर्मफलहेतुर्भूर्मा ते संगोऽस्त्वकर्मणि॥
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Wednesday, November 13, 2013 11:27:41 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/12/2011
Posts: 28,794
Neurons: 164,315
Location: Livingston, Scotland, United Kingdom
Hi!

Shivanand
is right - the two words are related that way.

If you want to know about porcelain, you may need to ask someone who is an expert in the subject.

"Vitrified" means "Changed into a state that is like glass, usually by heat."

"Vitreous" means "like glass".
There are things in nature that are vitreous (like glass) but have not been vitrified.
Part of your eye is "vitreous humour" - it is like glass. it has not been vitrified, it has not been changed to become like glass.

I would assume that all vitrified ceramic ware is vitreous (it has been changed by heat to become like glass - vitrified - so it is now like glass - vitreous).

In the science of ceramics, there may be a technical distinction between the two words.



Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
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