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What's the deal with aircraft? Options
TB
Posted: Wednesday, November 04, 2009 1:07:57 PM

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grammargeek wrote:


And hey, when you were trying to fall asleep in the cockpit at 30,000 feet, did you start counting the other aircraft as they went by? More importantly, did you ever spot the elusive antlercraft?[/color]



Antlercraft are restricted to Canadian airspace. Before napping we did have to activate the FSPWS (flying sheep proximity warning system) It made a loud bleat when one of those suckers got too close.



"Never argue with idiots, they drag you down to their level and then beat you with experience"
grammargeek
Posted: Wednesday, November 04, 2009 4:15:22 PM

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TB wrote:
Antlercraft are restricted to Canadian airspace. Before napping we did have to activate the FSPWS (flying sheep proximity warning system) It made a loud bleat when one of those suckers got too close.

My, my, my...I still have so much to learn. I didn't even know that the FSPWS existed, but I am very happy to find out that whenever I've been a passenger on a plane, I've been saved from the occasional errant sheepcraft.
(If I ever make it to Canada, then I'll be sure to be on the lookout for the antlercraft.)
TB
Posted: Wednesday, November 04, 2009 4:41:00 PM

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grammargeek wrote:
TB wrote:
Antlercraft are restricted to Canadian airspace. Before napping we did have to activate the FSPWS (flying sheep proximity warning system) It made a loud bleat when one of those suckers got too close.

My, my, my...I still have so much to learn. I didn't even know that the FSPWS existed,



If evasive action was taken and the FSPWS bleat went off a second time, we'd activate the BOHICA system.

"Never argue with idiots, they drag you down to their level and then beat you with experience"
grammargeek
Posted: Wednesday, November 04, 2009 4:48:46 PM

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TB wrote:
grammargeek wrote:
TB wrote:
Antlercraft are restricted to Canadian airspace. Before napping we did have to activate the FSPWS (flying sheep proximity warning system) It made a loud bleat when one of those suckers got too close.

My, my, my...I still have so much to learn. I didn't even know that the FSPWS existed,



If evasive action was taken and the FSPWS bleat went off a second time, we'd activate the BOHICA system.


You made me laugh. Thanks! Applause
Jyrkkä Jätkä
Posted: Wednesday, November 04, 2009 6:43:41 PM

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Wallace and Gromit are used to *.craft, here in sheep rescue.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dy9QeosTh7w&feature=channel


In the beginning there was nothing, which exploded.
grammargeek
Posted: Wednesday, November 04, 2009 6:59:03 PM

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Jyrkkä Jätkä wrote:
Wallace and Gromit are used to *.craft, here in sheep rescue.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dy9QeosTh7w&feature=channel


You guys are so clever; I don't know how you find these things. Thanks JJ! That was another great visual for the sheepcraft. If JPK watches this, he may never get to sleep again.
TB
Posted: Wednesday, November 04, 2009 7:03:15 PM

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Jyrkkä Jätkä wrote:
Wallace and Gromit are used to *.craft, here in sheep rescue.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dy9QeosTh7w&feature=channel



One of the many great joys of being a parent is that I get to see movies like The Curse of the Were Rabbit. Companies like Dream Works are really making kid's movies for the parents.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wrqRv0s5McU&feature=related

"Never argue with idiots, they drag you down to their level and then beat you with experience"
grammargeek
Posted: Wednesday, November 04, 2009 7:12:26 PM

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TB wrote:
Jyrkkä Jätkä wrote:
Wallace and Gromit are used to *.craft, here in sheep rescue.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dy9QeosTh7w&feature=channel



One of the many great joys of being a parent is that I get to see movies like The Curse of the Were Rabbit. Companies like Dream Works are really making kid's movies for the parents.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wrqRv0s5McU&feature=related


And another one! Thanks TB. I especially liked the cucumber cross <she said sheepishly>. (Wait a minute--where is that tongue twister thread?)
TB
Posted: Wednesday, November 04, 2009 10:48:52 PM

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True Story:

The "claymation" characters of Wallace and Gromit along with thirty years of work were destroyed in a fire:

Click HERE for article



"Never argue with idiots, they drag you down to their level and then beat you with experience"
Jyrkkä Jätkä
Posted: Wednesday, November 18, 2009 9:26:33 PM

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grammargeek wrote:
Jyrkkä Jätkä wrote:
Wallace and Gromit are used to *.craft, here in sheep rescue.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dy9QeosTh7w&feature=channel


You guys are so clever; I don't know how you find these things. Thanks JJ! That was another great visual for the sheepcraft. If JPK watches this, he may never get to sleep again.


I'm sure that JPK, if using SCCS, falls asheep.

(After posting earlier in Little Prince thread I noticed that I had used word cheepcraft. Well, the picture was looking like cheapcraft 'cos the sheep was in the box.)


In the beginning there was nothing, which exploded.
grammargeek
Posted: Wednesday, November 18, 2009 9:38:09 PM

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Jyrkkä Jätkä wrote:
grammargeek wrote:
Jyrkkä Jätkä wrote:
Wallace and Gromit are used to *.craft, here in sheep rescue.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dy9QeosTh7w&feature=channel


You guys are so clever; I don't know how you find these things. Thanks JJ! That was another great visual for the sheepcraft. If JPK watches this, he may never get to sleep again.


I'm sure that JPK, if using SCCS, falls asheep.

(After posting earlier in Little Prince thread I noticed that I had used word cheepcraft. Well, the picture was looking like cheapcraft 'cos the sheep was in the box.)


Oh, I haven't been following the Little Prince thread, but I'm glad to know you're keeping the dream alive!

SCCS = SheepCraft Control System?
Jyrkkä Jätkä
Posted: Wednesday, November 18, 2009 10:17:41 PM

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grammargeek wrote:


SCCS = SheepCraft Control System? [/color]


SheepCraft Calculating System, needed to fall asheep.


In the beginning there was nothing, which exploded.
grammargeek
Posted: Wednesday, November 18, 2009 10:25:20 PM

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Jyrkkä Jätkä wrote:
grammargeek wrote:


SCCS = SheepCraft Control System? [/color]


SheepCraft Calculating System, needed to fall asheep.


Ah, so my next guess would have been closer--SheepCraft Counting System.

However, December 25th will be coming up soon, and the SCCS will need to be able to be distinguished from the SantaCraft Control System.
Jyrkkä Jätkä
Posted: Wednesday, November 18, 2009 10:36:32 PM

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Here she finally is: sheepcraft!
(Monty Python's YouTube video)


In the beginning there was nothing, which exploded.
JPK
Posted: Friday, November 20, 2009 11:41:19 AM
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Jyrkkä Jätkä wrote:
Here she finally is: sheepcraft!
(Monty Python's YouTube video)


hahaha that was awesome! thanks! :D

The Wallace and Gromit video was also amusing!
Jyrkkä Jätkä
Posted: Saturday, November 21, 2009 10:36:52 AM

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In some other world there is warcraft:



In the beginning there was nothing, which exploded.
Galad
Posted: Tuesday, November 24, 2009 10:51:59 AM

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Jyrkkä Jätkä wrote:
Wallace and Gromit are used to *.craft, here in sheep rescue.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dy9QeosTh7w&feature=channel




That was AWESOME

The Law often allows what Honor Forbids- Bernard-Joseph Saurin
grammargeek
Posted: Saturday, November 28, 2009 10:55:32 PM

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I was just watching Merry Madagascar on TV, and the Santacraft was pulled through the sky by penguins instead of reindeer. Does that make it a penguincraft?

Also, some of the penguins were wearing red sashes so I was wondering if they might be "spicy ninja penguins." However, they did not have color-coordinated headbands so I'm thinking that might rule out the ninja part, but they could still be spicy.

Whistle I like things spicy, spicy! Whistle

Maybe what we are really looking at then is spicypenguincraft.
sujavinay
Posted: Sunday, November 29, 2009 2:29:07 AM
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If there is only one kind of aircraft, like two Boeings then the plural is aircraft. If there are two different types of aircraft like one Boeing 747 and one IL 76 aircraft, then, when we refer to these two aircraft, should the plural be aircrafts or aircraft?

The difficulties that come are ordeals and tests and if one meets them in the right spirit, one comes out stronger and spiritually purer and greater.
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Isaac Samuel
Posted: Sunday, November 29, 2009 12:47:47 PM

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It is counterintuitive to use "aircraft" to denote more than one aircraft; unless, "aircrafts" denote(s) something
different in meaning. I have seen it used as "aircrafts" in many litterateurs in plural.

If this kind of usage is just one of those idiosyncrasies in English ,I would not have any compunction in using
Aircrafts,Mouses and sheeps etc.in context.

I hope few of you have enough ammunition to convince me to change my stance.
Jyrkkä Jätkä
Posted: Sunday, November 29, 2009 1:10:29 PM

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Here a mouse using a singular cheesecraft with several holes.




In the beginning there was nothing, which exploded.
grammargeek
Posted: Sunday, November 29, 2009 2:07:18 PM

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Jyrkkä Jätkä wrote:
Here a mouse using a singular cheesecraft with several holes.




Reminds me of "flying carpet-craft"!

Where is my genie? Oh yeah--playing basketball.
DHeavyOne
Posted: Sunday, November 29, 2009 10:16:03 PM

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TB wrote:
[quote=Jyrkkä Jätkä]Wallace and Gromit are used to *.craft, here in sheep rescue.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dy9QeosTh7w&feature=channel



One of the many great joys of being a parent is that I get to see movies like The Curse of the Were Rabbit. Companies like Dream Works are really making kid's movies for the parents.


You are absolutely right! My daughters are eight and five and I am SURE that I derive more enjoyment out of these newer movies than they do.....at least that's my interpretation when they say,"....come on, Dad, do we have to watch The Spongebob Movie again?"

By the way, the BOHICA reference was great! I haven't heard it in years, other than on a TV show a friend of mine was acting on that ran for a few years called The Unit.....solid show.

Take it ease....
DHeavyOne
Posted: Sunday, November 29, 2009 10:21:11 PM

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grammargeek wrote:
I was just watching Merry Madagascar on TV, and the Santacraft was pulled through the sky by penguins instead of reindeer. Does that make it a penguincraft?

Also, some of the penguins were wearing red sashes so I was wondering if they might be "spicy ninja penguins." However, they did not have color-coordinated headbands so I'm thinking that might rule out the ninja part, but they could still be spicy.

Whistle I like things spicy, spicy! Whistle

Maybe what we are really looking at then is spicypenguincraft.


Let me help interpret.....he, he, he.....perhaps the un-colourcoordinated penguin headbands, with the red sashes, presuming there were four of them, may have been the lesser know cousins of the famous reptiles from the eighties.....these cousins being the Teenaged Mutant Ninja Penguins, hence the entire flying circus could be referred to as the Teenaged Mutant Ninja Penguincraft (TMNP)....NASA is going to love us. Lock your doors tonight, folks!
TB
Posted: Sunday, November 29, 2009 11:38:12 PM

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Isaac Samuel wrote:
It is counterintuitive to use "aircraft" to denote more than one aircraft; unless, "aircrafts" denote(s) something
different in meaning. I have seen it used as "aircrafts" in many litterateurs in plural.

If this kind of usage is just one of those idiosyncrasies in English ,I would not have any compunction in using
Aircrafts,Mouses and sheeps etc.in context.

I hope few of you have enough ammunition to convince me to change my stance.



Sorry Isaac, I was in the aircraft biz for over thirty years. The plural of aircraft is aircraft.

From:
http://www.thefreedictionary.com/aircraft

aircraft [ˈɛəˌkrɑːft]
n pl -craft

From:
http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/aircraft

Main Entry: air·craft
Pronunciation: \ˈer-ˌkraft\
Function: noun
Inflected Form(s): plural aircraft

"Never argue with idiots, they drag you down to their level and then beat you with experience"
TB
Posted: Sunday, November 29, 2009 11:40:45 PM

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sujavinay wrote:
If there is only one kind of aircraft, like two Boeings then the plural is aircraft. If there are two different types of aircraft like one Boeing 747 and one IL 76 aircraft, then, when we refer to these two aircraft, should the plural be aircrafts or aircraft?



aircraft (see links above)



"Never argue with idiots, they drag you down to their level and then beat you with experience"
TB
Posted: Sunday, November 29, 2009 11:50:17 PM

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DHeavyOne wrote:
By the way, the BOHICA reference was great! I haven't heard it in years, other than on a TV show a friend of mine was acting on that ran for a few years called The Unit.....solid show.

Take it ease....



Glad you liked it. I knew gg knew BOHICA but I wasn't sure about anyone else.

"Never argue with idiots, they drag you down to their level and then beat you with experience"
sandraleesmith46
Posted: Monday, November 30, 2009 1:41:51 AM

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Jyrkka Jatka offered a few graphics on aviation I have to question: Can you read that ATC device from 35-40,000 feet up? And was that Swisscheese Air or Gruyere Air the mouse was flying? I'm not familiar with that particular line. Or was it a feeder? Honestly, the lot of you! I keep laughing myself into asthma attacks! As to TB's mouse problem, I could loan you a mouser... she catches the 4-legged variety too...

fair winds and following seas
Thon
Posted: Monday, November 30, 2009 7:38:29 AM

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Maybe the term originated in the days of the Wright brothers when various attempts to fabricate a flying vehicle were referred to as 'aircraft'.
Am I right in assuming that the word 'craft' stems from the German/Dutch word 'kracht' (power, as in horsepower or handpowered)?
It might be correct to say aircrafts to a collection of helicopters, ultralights, jets and plains on an airshow?

I agree with Isaac Samuel that it's due to the unfortunate choice of the adjective 'craft' as in craftsmanship and 'arts and crafts' which would lead to misinterpretation of the plural.

By the sound of it, people in most kung-fu movies possess aircrafts.
Louis Armstrong could hold a note like forever due to his aircrafts.
A talented politician must have hot-aircrafts.
The pilots vaportrails were proof of his aircraftsmanship.

_________________

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Jyrkkä Jätkä
Posted: Monday, November 30, 2009 7:52:49 AM

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My neighbour has technical skills. Here he is doing some weekly maintenance for his carpetcraft. Or maybe he tries to give it a cold kick-start.




In the beginning there was nothing, which exploded.
TB
Posted: Monday, November 30, 2009 9:42:59 AM

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sandraleesmith46 wrote:
Jyrkka Jatka offered a few graphics on aviation I have to question: Can you read that ATC device from 35-40,000 feet up? And was that Swisscheese Air or Gruyere Air the mouse was flying? I'm not familiar with that particular line. Or was it a feeder? Honestly, the lot of you! I keep laughing myself into asthma attacks! As to TB's mouse problem, I could loan you a mouser... she catches the 4-legged variety too...



My mouses are allergic to mousers.

"Never argue with idiots, they drag you down to their level and then beat you with experience"
TB
Posted: Monday, November 30, 2009 9:46:07 AM

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Thon wrote:

It might be correct to say aircrafts to a collection of helicopters, ultralights, jets and plains on an airshow?



Nope, they are all collections of aircraft. Merriam-Webster and TFD agree. Angel

"Never argue with idiots, they drag you down to their level and then beat you with experience"
Isaac Samuel
Posted: Monday, November 30, 2009 10:02:23 AM

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TB:

Please search TFD for "Aircrafts" ,then click the "Encyclopedia" link and look for "References in periodicals archive"
to be convinced of my claim.
I am not challenging your conviction. What I am opposed to is: when a language becomes counterintuitive,it becomes counterproductive to speakers and writers.
early_apex
Posted: Monday, November 30, 2009 10:37:26 AM

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DHeavyOne wrote:

You are absolutely right! My daughters are eight and five and I am SURE that I derive more enjoyment out of these newer movies than they do.....at least that's my interpretation when they say,"....come on, Dad, do we have to watch The Spongebob Movie again?"

By the way, the BOHICA reference was great! I haven't heard it in years, other than on a TV show a friend of mine was acting on that ran for a few years called The Unit.....solid show.


"BOHICA" went over my head, but I looked it up - funny. I think The Unit is coming back for another season - I hope so anyway. One of my favorite quotes: "You know how I feel about helicopters; 10,000 parts flying in an uneven formation."

"Shut up, she explained." - Ring Lardner
early_apex
Posted: Monday, November 30, 2009 10:39:51 AM

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Isaac Samuel wrote:
TB:

Please search TFD for "Aircrafts" ,then click the "Encyclopedia" link and look for "References in periodicals archive"
to be convinced of my claim.
I am not challenging your conviction. What I am opposed to is: when a language becomes counterintuitive,it becomes counterproductive to speakers and writers.


This sounds like a new test for fluency.
"So, you speak English?"
"Yes, both intuitive and counterintiutive English"

"Shut up, she explained." - Ring Lardner
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