The Free Dictionary  
mailing list For webmasters
Welcome Guest Forum Search | Active Topics | Members

Dan Brown, a mediocre writer and his unbelievable commercial success Options
man in black
Posted: Monday, November 02, 2009 8:29:42 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 10/20/2009
Posts: 536
Neurons: 1,334
Location: Cuba
I´ve read like three of Brown´s books and though one is carried by the plot, each and everyone of its titles leave us with nothing. Despite his inefficiency as a true writer he´s sold millions of his books, whereas more skilled and classic writers need tieme to rise to public favor and that tells a lot about the reading publich, as for me I´m reluctant to read any more of his books. I happened to watch a documentary by National Geographic based on the controversial statements written in The Da Vinci Code and the interview of its author convinced me of his utter stupidity when he asserts without any historical proof that the hypothesis he proposes in his book are true. I was glad to hear an authority like Umberto Eco shattered many of his puerile assertions. Liar Liar

look into my eyeballs, there thy beauty lies, then why not lips on lips since eyes on eyes? William Shakespeare
pedro
Posted: Monday, November 02, 2009 8:38:00 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 5/21/2009
Posts: 12,895
Neurons: 57,665
How come you managed three? I'm very impatient with books. If they don't seem to match expectations after around three chapters I will happily abandon them. Actually I wonder how I can manage three chapters.

All good ideas arrive by chance- Max Ernst
rosicrucian
Posted: Monday, November 02, 2009 9:02:10 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 10/25/2009
Posts: 142
Neurons: 425
Location: Philippines
i think he's just sharing his ideas and his point of view about religious aspects.
he don't want us to believe what he wrote, he wants us to think about it.
like Angels and Demons, it's like conflict between science and religion.
has anyone watched the movie The Exorcism of Emily Rose?Sick


My position concerning God is that of an agnostic. I am convinced that a vivid consciousness of the primary importance of moral principles for the betterment and ennoblement of life does not need the idea of a law-giver, especially a law-giver who works on the basis of reward and punishment.-Albert Einstein
wercozy
Posted: Monday, November 02, 2009 9:25:51 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/1/2009
Posts: 1,470
Neurons: 3,480
Location: United States
I don't find his books mediocre. I remember being spell bound, enthralled, biting my nails and sitting on the edge of my seat. I enjoy his books and the time flies by.

I'd rather have people like Dan Brown enjoy success than multi-million dollar football players and ridiculous foul-mouthed, uneducated rap stars.

man in black: I'm sorry you have a problem with science and religion. Me, the more I learn about science the more spiritual I become. Organized religion? I don't need myths and fairy tales to explain my world. I don't need a million people shouting the same phony bologna. In my opinion, 1 million people shouting the same thing = 1. More followers doesn't make the dogma MORE true.

You cannot reason someone out of something they were not reasoned into. Jonathan Swift

rosicrucian
Posted: Monday, November 02, 2009 9:38:00 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 10/25/2009
Posts: 142
Neurons: 425
Location: Philippines
wercozy wrote:
man in black: I'm sorry you have a problem with science and religion. Me, the more I learn about science the more spiritual I become. Organized religion? I don't need myths and fairy tales to explain my world. I don't need a million people shouting the same phony bologna. In my opinion, 1 million people shouting the same thing = 1. More followers doesn't make the dogma MORE true.

i think we have the same perception concerning science and religion, it's just that i'm still looking for answers
concerning relationship between science and religion. i remember Einstein's point of view:
"My position concerning God is that of an agnostic. I am convinced that a vivid consciousness of the primary importance of moral principles for the betterment and ennoblement of life does not need the idea of a law-giver, especially a law-giver who works on the basis of reward and punishment."

My position concerning God is that of an agnostic. I am convinced that a vivid consciousness of the primary importance of moral principles for the betterment and ennoblement of life does not need the idea of a law-giver, especially a law-giver who works on the basis of reward and punishment.-Albert Einstein
uuaschbaer
Posted: Monday, November 02, 2009 9:43:44 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 10/18/2009
Posts: 1,929
Neurons: 6,175
I never entirely understood the underlying motive of people reading books because they are popular, or listen to popular music for that matter. The amount of joy, comfort and other nice things derived from books and music--and qua books this applies only to fiction--is wholly dependent on the reader. One likes to flow from book to book and explore one's interest, one doesn't like trying to keep up with all the crap that your friends and neighbors have read and are reading. Again, 'crap' is highly subjective here.

*
peterhewett
Posted: Monday, November 02, 2009 10:28:05 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 5/15/2009
Posts: 2,454
Neurons: 3,698
Location: In my head
I agree with man in black. I think Dan Brown is a weak writer who uses awkward phrases and bad sentence construction. I think that the Da Vinci code is a very silly idea; too farfetched. Regardless of my view it is a question of each to his own. I also think, although I do not follow a religion, that it was offensive to those who follow Christianity. One should never be abusive of anothers beliefs. Examine them, yes, and constructively criticise, yes, but treat others beliefs with distain, no. Sometimes it is ok to think something but very impolite to state it.

He that increases in knowledge increases in pain.
uuaschbaer
Posted: Monday, November 02, 2009 10:35:17 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 10/18/2009
Posts: 1,929
Neurons: 6,175
peterhewett wrote:
I agree with man in black. I think Dan Brown is a weak writer who uses awkward phrases and bad sentence construction. I think that the Da Vinci code is a very silly idea; too farfetched. Regardless of my view it is a question of each to his own. I also think, although I do not follow a religion, that it was offensive to those who follow Christianity. One should never be abusive of anothers belieifs. Examine them, yes, and constructively criticise, yes, but treat others beliefs with distain, no. Sometimes it is ok to think something but very impolite to state it.


Ah, but what if that belief contains the necessity of sacrificing you? I'd state my disdain and their mothers'.

Edit: 'They' (from their) are the believers, not the government. It's so often the case that I catch myself using 'they' without justification.

*
peterhewett
Posted: Monday, November 02, 2009 10:53:32 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 5/15/2009
Posts: 2,454
Neurons: 3,698
Location: In my head


uuaschbaer said

Ah, but what if that belief contains the necessity of sacrificing you? I'd state my disdain and their mothers'.
peter replied

I am sorry uuaschbaer I don't understand what you are saying. Can you elaborate?

He that increases in knowledge increases in pain.
fred
Posted: Monday, November 02, 2009 10:55:28 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 4/1/2009
Posts: 1,475
Neurons: 4,457
Location: United States
To some, German Naziism was/is a religion.

Head hunting in Borneo is part of the regional religion.

"Supposin' I was to go to work and learn how to... to read writin'. Well, how'd I know that the feller that... that wrote the writin' was a writin' the writin' right? See it could be that he wrote the writin' all wrong. Here I'd be just a readin' wrong writin', don't ya see? You probably been doin' it your whole life, just a readin' wrong writin' and not even knowin‘ it." Festus
Luftmarque
Posted: Monday, November 02, 2009 11:12:48 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 3/17/2009
Posts: 3,118
Neurons: 11,610
Location: Pau, Aquitaine, France
We have a long and honorable tradition of wildly successful mediocre authors. Stephen King for example.

P.S. I loved the Da Vinci Code movie.

}- Luftmarque لوفتمارك -{ Le doute n'est pas une condition agréable, mais la certitude est absurde.—Voltaire
Raparee
Posted: Monday, November 02, 2009 11:26:50 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 3/17/2009
Posts: 1,231
Neurons: 18,102
Luftmarque wrote:
We have a long and honorable tradition of wildly successful mediocre authors. Stephen King for example.


Just so you know, this statement gave me much glee with accompanying mental cackling. Applause Actually, I think the most interesting thing I've read by King was a two-page article on how to become a "successful" author and even he said it had nothing whatsoever to do with real talent. I'll try and dig up a link to that if I remember later tonight, but I'm sure it can be googled. (To be fair, I did very much like The Stand. Most of the few others of his that I've read? Not so much.)

There is a plethora of total crap out there (to each their own). But the good thing about that is that, "Hey, I can write better than that and THEY'RE getting printed and raking in beaucoup money. I really should finish that book that's been languishing on my hard drive forever!" Even the books that are rampantly slaughtered in reviews can still have rabid followings if they are successfully marketed to a specific niche, some of which are HUGE. For instance, I've read far better vampire stories than the ferally popular one out now, but a lot of people like it, so hey, let them. Doesn't mean I have to read it or like it, I just have to avoid it like the plague. ;)


A closed mind is like a closed book - nothing can be gained if either remains closed.
uuaschbaer
Posted: Monday, November 02, 2009 11:27:40 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 10/18/2009
Posts: 1,929
Neurons: 6,175
peterhewett wrote:


uuaschbaer said

Ah, but what if that belief contains the necessity of sacrificing you? I'd state my disdain and their mothers'.
peter replied

I am sorry uuaschbaer I don't understand what you are saying. Can you elaborate?


Glad to. In your penultimate post you said that some scornful thoughts ought not to be uttered. I tried to point out that one can only go so far with that mindset. In some instances, whereby one's own matters are concerned, even you, I presume, considerate as you however are, will be compelled to speak out.
Hmm... That last sentence came out a bit jumbled. Still, hope it clarifies things. Long story short: If you're about to be cast on a holy fire, you'd say lesser nice things about the religious imperative that drives the religious.

*
peterhewett
Posted: Monday, November 02, 2009 11:38:02 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 5/15/2009
Posts: 2,454
Neurons: 3,698
Location: In my head
Ah I see what you are saying uuaschbaer. Yes of course it is good to speak out...and strongly at times. I was referring to a needless abusive disdainful attitude to those who do not think as us, in other words scorn and superiority. Yes Fred is right to bring his points out too.

He that increases in knowledge increases in pain.
silvanasono
Posted: Monday, November 02, 2009 11:40:15 AM

Rank: Newbie

Joined: 10/30/2009
Posts: 3
Neurons: 9
Location: Italy
Well, I did not reach the end of the first chapter of the "DaVinci Code". I did not feel very well after reading it and say that I read all the books of Harry Potter...
The point is that many of the modern writers rely on their capacity of shocking and thrilling people ad nauseam, because they have nothing concrete and valuable to give to the world.
So they point on sensational effects to attract people. Think
Raven
Posted: Monday, November 02, 2009 11:42:00 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 7/27/2009
Posts: 88
Neurons: 260
Location: Pacific Northwest, United States
The same observation could be made about pop music, sports stars and celebrities in general. I've never read a Stephen King or a Dan Brown novel, but I did enjoy the two movies that were made based on Brown's books. Good story telling and entertaining. I wouldn't bother to see those movies again no more than I would bother to see the majority of Stephen Spielberg's movies. I guess it all comes down to entertainment value. There'a a new movie coming out called "2012" based on the myth about the Myan calendar that is known to end the 21st of December 2012 (according to the Georgian calendar). Some people I've met in my adult life actually believe that the world is going to end in 2012, well, if it does I just hope it's more intriguing than the Y2K debacle. I've a calendar on my wall that ends in 2009, does that mean the world will end 31/12/2009? I should hope not because I'm looking forward to drinking champagne and partying.
early_apex
Posted: Monday, November 02, 2009 11:52:22 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 4/20/2009
Posts: 2,280
Neurons: 12,835
Location: Spindletop, Texas, United States
Raven wrote:
The same observation could be made about pop music, sports stars and celebrities in general. I've never read a Stephen King or a Dan Brown novel, but I did enjoy the two movies that were made based on Brown's books. Good story telling and entertaining. I wouldn't bother to see those movies again no more than I would bother to see the majority of Stephen Spielberg's movies. I guess it all comes down to entertainment value. There'a a new movie coming out called "2012" based on the myth about the Myan calendar that is known to end the 21st of December 2012 (according to the Georgian calendar). Some people I've met in my adult life actually believe that the world is going to end in 2012, well, if it does I just hope it's more intriguing than the Y2K debacle. I've a calendar on my wall that ends in 2009, does that mean the world will end 31/12/2009? I should hope not because I'm looking forward to drinking champagne and partying.


Good thought. We should go to the book store and see if they have any 2010 calendars. If so, we can have hope for the future!

"Shut up, she explained." - Ring Lardner
rosicrucian
Posted: Monday, November 02, 2009 12:53:47 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 10/25/2009
Posts: 142
Neurons: 425
Location: Philippines
i didn't find Dan Brown as a mediocre writer since all of us have freedom
to express feelings and thoughts, it only depends on how we gonna do that.
for Dan Brown he chose to express his ideas by writing novels, we can't blame him,
it is for us if we're going to believe what he wrote and if someone has a strong
devotion or belief in his own religion, then he or she should not be affected.

My position concerning God is that of an agnostic. I am convinced that a vivid consciousness of the primary importance of moral principles for the betterment and ennoblement of life does not need the idea of a law-giver, especially a law-giver who works on the basis of reward and punishment.-Albert Einstein
BonKurei
Posted: Monday, November 02, 2009 1:16:12 PM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 10/31/2009
Posts: 62
Neurons: 189
Location: United States
Maybe writing that you consider mediocre is actually great, and what you consider great is mediocre. The true question here is: what makes writing great? Can great writing even be defined objectively or is it made great by its readership?
Christine
Posted: Monday, November 02, 2009 1:20:08 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 4/3/2009
Posts: 3,923
Neurons: 15,842
I like to read nonfiction like ..The History of Hydrogen or The History of Pi, etc.

I am carrying my heart~I am carrying my rhythm~I am carrying my prayers~But you can't kill my spirit~It's soaring and strong (Paula Cole's Me Lyrics)***We are not human beings having a spiritual experience. We ARE spirtual beings having a human experience.(T.deChardin)***There are only two ways to live your life. One is as though nothing is a miracle. The other is as though everything is a miracle. (Albert Einstein)



Raparee
Posted: Monday, November 02, 2009 1:28:27 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 3/17/2009
Posts: 1,231
Neurons: 18,102
BonKurei wrote:
Maybe writing that you consider mediocre is actually great, and what you consider great is mediocre. The true question here is: what makes writing great? Can great writing even be defined objectively or is it made great by its readership?

I think great writing completely envelops the reader, involves fantastic characters, dialogue, and plots, but what does that varies from reader to reader. Throughout high school, I was subjected to the works of Charles Dickens and John Steinbeck and personally, I don't think I could find more incessantly boring authors if I tried. I don't care if they're considered Greats, I find them boring as all get out, but I also know many love them. I preferred the works of Shakespeare, Poe, and Bradbury (now there's an eccelectic lineup from high school!).


A closed mind is like a closed book - nothing can be gained if either remains closed.
man in black
Posted: Monday, November 02, 2009 1:28:58 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 10/20/2009
Posts: 536
Neurons: 1,334
Location: Cuba
For me great books are those who covey an imperishable message and aimed at the heart of the human soul. Dan Brown is just a mere tinker of words who plagirized much of the hypothesis he claims as true. The Name of the Rose by Umberto Eco, that´s the kind of novel that deserves our praises. I´m always distrustful of artists whose outputs are never-ending. It takes centuries to create what should last centuries.

look into my eyeballs, there thy beauty lies, then why not lips on lips since eyes on eyes? William Shakespeare
bugdoctor
Posted: Monday, November 02, 2009 1:47:17 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 4/8/2009
Posts: 1,792
Neurons: 5,456
Location: United States - Georgia
Raparee wrote:
BonKurei wrote:
Maybe writing that you consider mediocre is actually great, and what you consider great is mediocre. The true question here is: what makes writing great? Can great writing even be defined objectively or is it made great by its readership?

I think great writing completely envelops the reader, involves fantastic characters, dialogue, and plots, but what does that varies from reader to reader. Throughout high school, I was subjected to the works of Charles Dickens and John Steinbeck and personally, I don't think I could find more incessantly boring authors if I tried. I don't care if they're considered Greats, I find them boring as all get out, but I also know many love them. I preferred the works of Shakespeare, Poe, and Bradbury (now there's an eccelectic lineup from high school!).


I'm with you! Toss in Louis L'Amour, John Sanford, and Stephen King and we're off and running!
Angel


"Those who give up essential liberty to obtain a little temporary safety, deserve neither liberty nor safety." Benjamin Franklin
Mr. Montag
Posted: Monday, November 02, 2009 1:58:49 PM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 10/27/2009
Posts: 74
Neurons: 118
I haven't read any of Mr. Brown's books, so I can't comment on the actual quality
of his writing. Dan Brown certainly borrowed heavily from various false documents (including the Priory of Sion),and passed off some of these documents as historical in nature, for his successful "The Da Vinci Code". Using a historical document, and placing it in fictional conetxt, in order to drive a plot, isn't so bad at all in my view. The problem is that, for "The Da Vici Code", the Priory of Sion was already heavily discredited at the time of the 2003 publication, and had been for more than several decades. Mr. Brown, IMO, doesn't win any points for originality for his plot construction, on that point alone.
I really don't take much surprise in his success. Writing on an important historical subject, on a very superficially, but entertaining level, has been a license to
print money throughout history. It doesn't make it "great" writing in my view,
but it makes sense. People are looking for things to take them away from their
lives. Mr. Brown's fiction is just one of the more controversial bodies of work,
out of a sea of fiction authors. I like both fiction, and non-fiction, as well as
some historical based fiction.
fred
Posted: Monday, November 02, 2009 2:07:18 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 4/1/2009
Posts: 1,475
Neurons: 4,457
Location: United States
man in black wrote:
For me great books are those who covey an imperishable message and aimed at the heart of the human soul. Dan Brown is just a mere tinker of words who plagirized much of the hypothesis he claims as true. The Name of the Rose by Umberto Eco, that´s the kind of novel that deserves our praises. I´m always distrustful of artists whose outputs are never-ending. It takes centuries to create what should last centuries.


I dislike artists who have a pile of work and the works all look the same, year after year, decade after decade.

"Supposin' I was to go to work and learn how to... to read writin'. Well, how'd I know that the feller that... that wrote the writin' was a writin' the writin' right? See it could be that he wrote the writin' all wrong. Here I'd be just a readin' wrong writin', don't ya see? You probably been doin' it your whole life, just a readin' wrong writin' and not even knowin‘ it." Festus
Jonafat
Posted: Monday, November 02, 2009 3:00:36 PM
Rank: Member

Joined: 10/30/2009
Posts: 15
Neurons: 45
Location: Wiscanada
I think he's masterful at creating an interesting plot and keeping his narrative moving along quickly, but his writing merely belongs among the best of pop culture authors, without having any really edifying (i.e. social or moral) imperative that distinguishes the greats of literature from the pulp collective.
kisholoy mukherjee
Posted: Monday, November 02, 2009 3:04:06 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 10/31/2009
Posts: 3,741
Neurons: 7,777
Location: here and there
I am not much of a reader at all, but i still somehow managed to read 3 of his books. Da vinci, A&D and DF. Obviously, anyone who has read one of the first two, needn't read the second one. They are so alike. I didn't have any idea about Christianity (hell, i don't even have much knowledge about hindusim, which is supposed to be my religion. But i consider myself non-religious and would always like to be that way. That's only because i have seen religion divide people more than it unites. Science, on the other hand is something that doesn't treat hindus, muslims or christians or any other differently. SO science and religion are different in my opinion. But that's me. If religion and science can together be used to unite one and all, then it is absolutely fine with me. but that's off the point) nor the things like opus dei, priory of sion etc. I didn't even know of the holy grail and that there were two schools of thought regarding whether jesus was god/man. I found all of this very interesting and intriguing in my first read. I never had a second read though, but i watched the movie. By then, i had already heard that the contents of the book were controversial. But you see, since i had no idea about the things mentioned in the book before i started reading it, i didn't know of the extent of truth in what i was reading. you may say that i should have researched on it a bit before believing it straight away. But then, i was reading it only for entertainment and so had asked my friend, who reads a lot of books to suggest a book which would be entertaining.
Personally i think, there is no "absolute" good/bad book....it is totally subjective. (just like other art forms like music, paintings, sketches, dance etc. i know i am not at all qualified to remark about these things. But still....
(i personally disliked digital fortress very much, but liked the concept of cyclic redundancy, to which i was newly introduced back then)

Gotcha, bud, again
rosicrucian
Posted: Monday, November 02, 2009 3:40:26 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 10/25/2009
Posts: 142
Neurons: 425
Location: Philippines
actually Dan Brown has his new novel that is The Lost Symbol. does anyone already read it?
i haven't read it yet.

My position concerning God is that of an agnostic. I am convinced that a vivid consciousness of the primary importance of moral principles for the betterment and ennoblement of life does not need the idea of a law-giver, especially a law-giver who works on the basis of reward and punishment.-Albert Einstein
kisholoy mukherjee
Posted: Monday, November 02, 2009 3:49:36 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 10/31/2009
Posts: 3,741
Neurons: 7,777
Location: here and there
rosicrucian wrote:
actually Dan Brown has his new novel that is The Lost Symbol. does anyone already read it?
i haven't read it yet.


i also just found it on the net.

Gotcha, bud, again
LeadPal
Posted: Monday, November 02, 2009 5:03:33 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 7/26/2009
Posts: 461
Neurons: 1,413
Location: Beyond the Impossible
By the time I finished The Da Vinci Code, I wanted to throw it through my wall. Even ignoring his clumsy style, and especially his droning dialogue, the whole story is just silly. There's hardly anything at stake, realistically, except the lives of a few dull protagonists. Discovering the secrets behind Jesus wouldn't actually bring down Catholicism, or usher in an age of enlightenment, or whatever the heck it's supposed to do; it's too easy to dispute and doesn't have any practical significance.

But although I've never read it, I understand that Digital Fortress is even worse:

Dan Brown wrote:
For two hours, Becker interpreted an endless stream of Mandarin symbols. But each time he gave them a translation, the cryptographers shook their heads in despair. Apparently the code was not making sense. Eager to help, Becker pointed out that all the characters they'd shown him had a common trait-they were also part of the Kanji language. Instantly the bustle in the room fell silent. The man in charge, a lanky chain-smoker named Morante, turned to Becker in disbelief.

"You mean these symbols have multiple meanings?"

Becker nodded. He explained that Kanji was a Japanese language based on modified Chinese characters. He'd been giving Mandarin translations because that's what they'd asked for.

"Jesus Christ." Morante coughed. "Let's try the Kanji."

Like magic, everything fell into place.

The cryptographers were duly impressed, but nonetheless, they still made Becker work on the characters out of sequence. "It's for your own safety" Morante said. "This way, you won't know what you're translating."

Becker laughed. Then he noticed nobody else was laughing.

This is so poorly researched that it's actually embarrassing to read.

Currently Reading: Nothing but textbooks
Currently Watching: Tengen Toppa Gurren Lagann (again)
Geeman
Posted: Monday, November 02, 2009 5:52:32 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 10/2/2009
Posts: 1,787
Neurons: 115,245
Location: Whittier, California, United States
I'll not chime in to bash poor Dan Brown because he's kind of the litarary equivalent of a sleepwalker. It's just not cool to wake a sleepwalker. He could hurt himself.

So, that said, I will note that DB does have nicely developed skills when it comes to plotting. His stuff moves right along in a way that is very modern in a 21st century sense. There's an immediacy to his action that is hard to capture in the static arena of prose and print. Of course, it's a little debatable whether that is a merit or not, but it is a highly developed skill. Personally, I don't think that "sport" curling is particlarly worthwhile, but if people enjoy sliding on ice with brooms who am I to judge? Same with Dan Brown.

So, with THAT said, I would like to note that one trick DB (or his editors) employ is that his chapters often end right in the middle of the action. Where most people simply wait for a lull to end a chapter, Brown puts his chapter breaks right in the middle of an action sequence, and the lulls are in the middle of the chapters. He does pace well, but the artificial way he breaks up the chapters makes that plotting seem even more dramatic since nobody is going to stop reading a chapter that ends with something like "In a flash of insight Langdon realized the solution to the riddle, and that solution meant the murderer was in the very room in which he had left Sophie napping! He turned and ran back up the stairs...."

It's a cute trick. He relies on it a bit more than an author should (Shhh. Shh. Go back to sleep, Danny) and if you know what he's doing you can just stop reading in the middle of the chapters at the normal lulls in the action, but it's a good technique to use from time to time if you want your book to be "a page turner."
nooblet
Posted: Monday, November 02, 2009 8:58:00 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 10/15/2009
Posts: 1,570
Neurons: 4,778
Location: United States
LeadPal wrote:
By the time I finished The Da Vinci Code, I wanted to through it throw my wall. Even ignoring his clumsy style, and especially his droning dialogue, the whole story is just silly. There's hardly anything at stake, realistically, except the lives of a few dull protagonists. Discovering the secrets behind Jesus wouldn't actually bring down Catholicism, or usher in an age of enlightenment, or whatever the heck it's supposed to do; it's too easy to dispute and doesn't have any practical significance.

But although I've never read it, I understand that Digital Fortress is even worse:

--snip--

This is so poorly researched that it's actually embarrassing to read.


Wow, I can't believe he made a blunder THAT bad. Kanji ARE Chinese characters in terms of how they are written (though sometimes there are minor differences between how they are written), as well as their meaning. The only difference is that someone who speaks Mandarin will pronounce it one way, someone who speaks Cantonese will pronounce it a second way, and someone who speaks Japanese will pronounce it a third way.

Of course, there are exceptions, as the Japanese have created their own new Kanji, and many of the Kanji have been simplified down from the Hanzi (the Chinese characters) so that they no longer share the same written form (however, these do not have Chinese counterparts). There are also some Kanji that have had their meanings changed, but the vast majority of them remain the same.
Babezy
Posted: Monday, November 02, 2009 9:13:26 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 10/16/2009
Posts: 929
Neurons: 2,806
Location: United States
I thought Umberto Eco's Foucault's Pendulum (going by memory on that title, sorry if it's wrong) was a great portrayal of secret societies, conspiracies, and paranoia. [Disclosure--had to read it with a dictionary by my side.] I think Dan Brown's a hack who should have given his plot ideas to someone more talented. For a totally invented history with some real panache I'd recommend A History of the Funerary Violin (again, memory on the title, sorry). I loved Ray Bradbury's Martian Chronicles. And there you have my four cents' worth.

This is not a novel to be tossed aside lightly. It should be thrown with great force. --Dorothy Parker
Margarit Bamllari
Posted: Tuesday, November 03, 2009 3:13:21 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 6/4/2009
Posts: 198
Neurons: 436
Dan Brown’s writing is shallowly deep of conspicuous speculations, with unconfirmed religious facts.

I have read only DaVinci Code and nothing else. There are tons of better books worth spending time and learning.

Ah forgot. What was his best thing which led to the success? Marketing months ahead of the release of the first book. That was enough to guarantee success among shallowest readers.

STRENGTH IS BUILT FROM ONES FAILURES NOT FROM ONES SUCCESSES –COCO CHANEL
MiTziGo
Posted: Tuesday, November 03, 2009 12:37:28 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 3/16/2009
Posts: 1,393
Neurons: 6,142
kisholoy mukherjee wrote:
I am not much of a reader at all, but i still somehow managed to read 3 of his books. Da vinci, A&D and DF. Obviously, anyone who has read one of the first two, needn't read the second one. They are so alike...


I could not agree with you more. I also read the same three, starting with Angels and Demons, then Da Vinci Code, and finally Digital Fortress. What shocked me the most was that Angels and Demons and Da Vinci Code are exactly the same book. He reuses the same characters and the same plot simply set in a different city with the same plot twists in each one. What seemed interesting, gripping, and novel in the first book I read was trite and predictable by the time I got to the second. Since he wrote Angels and Demons first, I cannot fathom why the critics who fawn over Da Vinci Code fail to note that he plagiarized his own work! Digital Fortress again recycled many of the same characters and plot devices.

I just want to say...Dan Brown, I'm on to you!
Users browsing this topic
Guest


Forum Jump
You cannot post new topics in this forum.
You cannot reply to topics in this forum.
You cannot delete your posts in this forum.
You cannot edit your posts in this forum.
You cannot create polls in this forum.
You cannot vote in polls in this forum.

Main Forum RSS : RSS
Forum Terms and Guidelines. Copyright © 2008-2017 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.