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What's everyone reading? Options
md56
Posted: Saturday, October 17, 2009 7:11:22 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 5/29/2009
Posts: 161
Neurons: 500
Location: Charlotte, North Carolina
I just finished Ender's Game by Orsen Scott Card and can not wait to delve further into his series, it was fantastic!
dsturges
Posted: Saturday, October 17, 2009 8:00:42 PM
Rank: Newbie

Joined: 9/5/2009
Posts: 4
Neurons: 12
Location: California, United States
Catch-22, by Heller! A lavish wealth of vocabularly with an enrapturing, poignantly relative storyline. I adore its theme.

Everyone tells me about Ender's Game and its significance, I just haven't yet summoned the necessity in reading it. I'm sure it'll come soon, though.
Babezy
Posted: Saturday, October 17, 2009 8:17:48 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 10/16/2009
Posts: 927
Neurons: 2,806
Location: United States
The Magic Mountain, by Thomas Mann. So far it's really interesting.

This is not a novel to be tossed aside lightly. It should be thrown with great force. --Dorothy Parker
pkeadle
Posted: Saturday, October 17, 2009 8:28:46 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 7/30/2009
Posts: 142
Neurons: 427
Location: America
Some detective book in the Cliff Janeway series (I don't recall the title),

A Susan Wittig Albert/ Beatrix potter book Tales of Briar Bank about bunnies and fairies, and a book in her China Bayles series Spanish Dagger.

Right now I'm at my daughter's mercy for picking out books as my Amazon was getting out of hand. She's a librarian, but she thinks her mom shouldn't read adult fare.

I usually read 4 or 5 at a time, depending on what I'm in the mood for.
md56
Posted: Saturday, October 17, 2009 8:50:16 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 5/29/2009
Posts: 161
Neurons: 500
Location: Charlotte, North Carolina
dsturges wrote:
Catch-22, by Heller! A lavish wealth of vocabularly with an enrapturing, poignantly relative storyline. I adore its theme.

Everyone tells me about Ender's Game and its significance, I just haven't yet summoned the necessity in reading it. I'm sure it'll come soon, though.

What a strange coincidence! I was on an unsuccessful search for that novel, and upon all hopes of mine diminishing, my boyfriend suggested Ender's Game.
Geeman
Posted: Saturday, October 17, 2009 8:51:53 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 10/2/2009
Posts: 1,788
Neurons: 125,022
Location: Whittier, California, United States
I usually read in bed, and at any given time there are 3-6 books sharing the sheets with me. At the moment, I'm reading and sleeping with

A. Lincoln by Ronald White
Planet Narnia by Michael Ward
The Silver Chair by C.S. Lewis (I'm reading these two together, chapter by chapther, to see what Ward thinks Lewis was up to in each book.
God's War by Christopher Tyerman

An old dictionary is my more constant bedmate, but those above are my current mistresses.
md56
Posted: Saturday, October 17, 2009 8:52:20 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 5/29/2009
Posts: 161
Neurons: 500
Location: Charlotte, North Carolina
pkeadle wrote:
Some detective book in the Cliff Janeway series (I don't recall the title),

A Susan Wittig Albert/ Beatrix potter book Tales of Briar Bank about bunnies and fairies, and a book in her China Bayles series Spanish Dagger.

Right now I'm at my daughter's mercy for picking out books as my Amazon was getting out of hand. She's a librarian, but she thinks her mom shouldn't read adult fare.

I usually read 4 or 5 at a time, depending on what I'm in the mood for.

I recommend to you the novel 'Three Bags Full'. It is thoroughly enjoyable.
http://www.amazon.com/Three-Bags-Full-Sheep-Detective/dp/0767927052/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1255827087&sr=8-1
md56
Posted: Saturday, October 17, 2009 8:53:08 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 5/29/2009
Posts: 161
Neurons: 500
Location: Charlotte, North Carolina
Geeman wrote:
I usually read in bed, and at any given time there are 3-6 books sharing the sheets with me. At the moment, I'm reading and sleeping with

A. Lincoln by Ronald White
Planet Narnia by Michael Ward
The Silver Chair by C.S. Lewis (I'm reading these two together, chapter by chapther, to see what Ward thinks Lewis was up to in each book.
God's War by Christopher Tyerman

An old dictionary is my more constant bedmate, but those above are my current mistresses.

Sounds like you are in good company.
TB
Posted: Saturday, October 17, 2009 11:32:15 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 4/12/2009
Posts: 1,440
Neurons: 4,277
Location: America
Recently finished Bernard Cornwell's Sharpe Stories (24 Napoleonic era historical novels, phew)
Took a well spent time-out with Water for Elephants (historical 1930s circus novel)
Currently reading The Pale Horseman the second book in Cornwell's Saxon Stories (historical novels about England during the 9th-century reign of Alfred the Great)

Did I mention I like historical novels?

"Never argue with idiots, they drag you down to their level and then beat you with experience"
genome
Posted: Saturday, October 17, 2009 11:32:46 PM

Rank: Member

Joined: 3/21/2009
Posts: 23
Neurons: 69
Location: India
I am reading Malcolm Gladwell's "Blink", 'the art of thinking wihtout thinking'. I can tell you, for once, the blurbs are not exaggerating!
teacher77
Posted: Saturday, October 17, 2009 11:38:49 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/18/2009
Posts: 47
Neurons: 146
dsturges wrote:
Catch-22, by Heller! A lavish wealth of vocabularly with an enrapturing, poignantly relative storyline. I adore its theme.

Everyone tells me about Ender's Game and its significance, I just haven't yet summoned the necessity in reading it. I'm sure it'll come soon, though.



I'm sure you wanted to write "Catch 22, by Heller! A lavish wealth of vocabulary with an enruptured and poignantly relative storyline."
TB
Posted: Sunday, October 18, 2009 12:04:13 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 4/12/2009
Posts: 1,440
Neurons: 4,277
Location: America
teacher77 wrote:
dsturges wrote:
Catch-22, by Heller! A lavish wealth of vocabularly with an enrapturing, poignantly relative storyline. I adore its theme.

Everyone tells me about Ender's Game and its significance, I just haven't yet summoned the necessity in reading it. I'm sure it'll come soon, though.



I'm sure you wanted to write "Catch 22, by Heller! A lavish wealth of vocabulary with an enruptured and poignantly relative storyline."



Did Yossarian claim to have a hernia along with all his other ailments? I read the book so many years ago I can't remember.

"Never argue with idiots, they drag you down to their level and then beat you with experience"
grammargeek
Posted: Sunday, October 18, 2009 12:45:21 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 3/21/2009
Posts: 11,145
Neurons: 33,836
Location: Arizona, U.S.
Mindfreak: Secret Revelations by Criss Angel (with Laura Norton)

I've only read about 20 pages so far.
wercozy
Posted: Sunday, October 18, 2009 1:03:57 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/1/2009
Posts: 1,470
Neurons: 3,480
Location: United States
A Short History of Nearly Everything by Bill Bryson

You cannot reason someone out of something they were not reasoned into. Jonathan Swift

Geeman
Posted: Sunday, October 18, 2009 1:37:38 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 10/2/2009
Posts: 1,788
Neurons: 125,022
Location: Whittier, California, United States
genome wrote:
I am reading Malcolm Gladwell's "Blink", 'the art of thinking wihtout thinking'. I can tell you, for once, the blurbs are not exaggerating!

Several folks whom I trust have recommended this book. It's going to the top of my list of things to get my hands on.
Dreamy
Posted: Sunday, October 18, 2009 2:15:11 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/11/2009
Posts: 1,505
Neurons: 8,828
Location: Hamilton, Waikato, New Zealand
Currently reading the Bible and many commentaries on it both in virtual and non-virtual realities, this being a life-long habit which provides me with material I can use to answer questions raised on numerous forums that I frequent under various "net-names".

I also
subscribe to Readers Digest and like to keep track of a quota of poetry on various blogs and forums.

My bookshelf includes books by Solzhenitsyn, Steinbeck, Dostoevsky, Du Maurier, Gogol, Tolstoy, and Turgenev some of which I've actually read. I read Solzhenitsyn's "The Gulag Archipelago" in one week but Tolstoy's "Resurrection" took me over a year as it was painfully drawn out and I kept losing interest.

Job 33:15 "In a dream, in a vision of the night, When deep sleep falls upon men, In slumberings upon the bed;" Theology 101 "If He doesn't know everything then He isn't God."
Hera
Posted: Sunday, October 18, 2009 3:58:02 AM
Rank: Newbie

Joined: 3/31/2009
Posts: 7
Neurons: 21
Location: Bulgaria
"Jingo" by Terry Pratchett. Just starting it and just finished "Pragmatics" by Levin.
md56
Posted: Sunday, October 18, 2009 4:28:34 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 5/29/2009
Posts: 161
Neurons: 500
Location: Charlotte, North Carolina
TB wrote:
Recently finished Bernard Cornwell's Sharpe Stories (24 Napoleonic era historical novels, phew)
Took a well spent time-out with Water for Elephants (historical 1930s circus novel)
Currently reading The Pale Horseman the second book in Cornwell's Saxon Stories (historical novels about England during the 9th-century reign of Alfred the Great)

Did I mention I like historical novels?

I saw Water for Elephants shelf-lining an end cap at B & N. It looks like an interesting read, is it any good?
md56
Posted: Sunday, October 18, 2009 4:30:23 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 5/29/2009
Posts: 161
Neurons: 500
Location: Charlotte, North Carolina
grammargeek wrote:
Mindfreak: Secret Revelations by Criss Angel (with Laura Norton)

I've only read about 20 pages so far.

I enjoy watching his stunts, but I couldn't imagine his narrative.
md56
Posted: Sunday, October 18, 2009 4:31:06 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 5/29/2009
Posts: 161
Neurons: 500
Location: Charlotte, North Carolina
wercozy wrote:
A Sort History of Nearly Everything by Bill Bryson

good book, I would also recommend The Lies my Teacher Told Me
murphy
Posted: Sunday, October 18, 2009 4:44:50 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 10/13/2009
Posts: 80
Neurons: 233
Location: United States-North Carolina
Just finished "Devil In The White City" and just started "East Of Eden"

I am also in the fifth week of a 40 week study of Genisis

Daily reading: "Irrestible Invitattion"

If you can live with it.
md56
Posted: Sunday, October 18, 2009 4:54:15 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 5/29/2009
Posts: 161
Neurons: 500
Location: Charlotte, North Carolina
murphy wrote:
Just finished "Devil In The White City" and just started "East Of Eden"

I am also in the fifth week of a 40 week study of Genisis

Daily reading: "Irrestible Invitattion"

I read that book a couple years ago. Very creepy.
I would like to read East of Eden, also Of Mice and Men.
I am sorry, I should have specified. I was speaking of Devil in the White City.
Although I'm sure you knew what I meant.
murphy
Posted: Sunday, October 18, 2009 5:13:00 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 10/13/2009
Posts: 80
Neurons: 233
Location: United States-North Carolina
"Creepy" is right - can't imagine the research involved to write the book. He did a great job, very informative. I can't imagine living there and then.

If you can live with it.
Articulate Dreamer
Posted: Sunday, October 18, 2009 5:33:08 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/16/2009
Posts: 12,343
Neurons: 90,041
Location: Bangalore, Karnataka, India
Dawkins' 'The God Delusion'... interesting, but he's clearly not in his field with theology.
Also James Burke's 'The Day the Universe Changed'... marvelous; from his BBC TV series in the 90s, about the impact of discoveries on prevalent thought.


"...hold infinity in the palm of your hand and eternity in an hour"
Articulate Dreamer
Posted: Sunday, October 18, 2009 5:38:15 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/16/2009
Posts: 12,343
Neurons: 90,041
Location: Bangalore, Karnataka, India
[quote=murphy]Just finished "Devil In The White City" and just started "East Of Eden"


'East of Eden' has surely one of the finest etched female characters in all fiction in Cathy... so unlike the namesake in "Wuthering Heights"

"...hold infinity in the palm of your hand and eternity in an hour"
Discombobulated
Posted: Sunday, October 18, 2009 7:21:08 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 5/14/2009
Posts: 319
Neurons: 975
Location: Scotland
Elantris by brendon something or other

I am thankful for laughter, except when milk comes out of my nose - Woody Allen
TB
Posted: Sunday, October 18, 2009 8:51:28 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 4/12/2009
Posts: 1,440
Neurons: 4,277
Location: America
md56 wrote:

I saw Water for Elephants shelf-lining an end cap at B & N. It looks like an interesting read, is it any good?



My wife recommended the book to me and I enjoyed it immensely. Several women in our family liked it and I'm waiting for my Dad's response. It has a feel of Cannery Row row and the movie Emperor of the North about it's character development, it was very well researched and the story line moves along well. I had a lot of "I didn't know they did 'that' moments" while reading the book, always a pleasure when reading well written historical novels.

The book moves back and forth between a present day old-folks-home and the memories of the protagonist. I skipped the current day stuff because I couldn't wait to get back the the main story.

The setting is a realistically rough, depression era traveling circus and the fascinating characters you'd encounter. It's like no book I've ever read and I feel it is well worth the time.



"Never argue with idiots, they drag you down to their level and then beat you with experience"
Anja Victoria
Posted: Sunday, October 18, 2009 9:05:49 AM

Rank: Newbie

Joined: 3/29/2009
Posts: 8
Neurons: 27
Location: Milan
"Se una notte d'inverno un viaggiatore" ("If on a winter's night a traveler") by the Italian writer Italo Calvino.

Anja Victoria
scribblescan
Posted: Sunday, October 18, 2009 9:20:18 AM

Rank: Newbie

Joined: 10/16/2009
Posts: 5
Neurons: 24
Location: Canada
MY own soon to be published books.
Jyrkkä Jätkä
Posted: Sunday, October 18, 2009 11:40:55 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/21/2009
Posts: 43,030
Neurons: 511,457
Location: Helsinki, Southern Finland Province, Finland
Within few years' periods I have to reread Steinbeck's Tortilla Flat.

In the beginning there was nothing, which exploded.
bugdoctor
Posted: Sunday, October 18, 2009 11:44:32 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 4/8/2009
Posts: 1,792
Neurons: 5,456
Location: United States - Georgia
I'm re-reading Shibumi, by Trevanian.

"Those who give up essential liberty to obtain a little temporary safety, deserve neither liberty nor safety." Benjamin Franklin
Isaac Samuel
Posted: Sunday, October 18, 2009 1:17:58 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 4/2/2009
Posts: 674
Neurons: 1,222
Location: United States
I just ordered a Kindle,hoping to save some trees and avoid news paper clutter around the house.
Please ask me again.
md56
Posted: Sunday, October 18, 2009 1:50:04 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 5/29/2009
Posts: 161
Neurons: 500
Location: Charlotte, North Carolina
scribblescan wrote:
MY own soon to be published books.

http://forum.thefreedictionary.com/postst4171_New-forum-suggestion.aspx
asienka.09
Posted: Sunday, October 18, 2009 2:27:44 PM
Rank: Newbie

Joined: 10/18/2009
Posts: 1
Neurons: 3
Location: United Kingdom
I love 'Snow White and Seven Samurai' by Tom Holt. But now I've just finished 'New Moon' by Stephenie Meyer to be able to have a chat about it with my niece.
shed
Posted: Sunday, October 18, 2009 3:08:33 PM
Rank: Member

Joined: 8/19/2009
Posts: 14
Neurons: 42
Location: United States
Just finished "Genghis Khan" by Jack Weatherford.  It was fascinating. 
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