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Use of the word goblet with reference to glass stemware and footed ware? Options
perfection161
Posted: Wednesday, September 25, 2013 12:58:56 AM
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A lot of companies today use the term goblets and stemware for their range of glasses aparft from 'tumblers'!

Is there a capacity (volume) criterion difference in the way these words are used?

Yes, i am aware that goblets has been and is the term when it comes to antiquated and often religious chalices of metal with ornate design especially as they existed in mediviel ages.

Thanks

thar
Posted: Wednesday, September 25, 2013 1:50:47 AM

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The only criterion I can think of is that a tumbler does not have a stem, and a goblet does. So glassware is one or the other. I guess that would make a goblet just a word for 'stemware'.

[But I am really not qualified to comment. I drink from a pint glass, and the last stylish wine glass in the house has recently been broken, so we are down to one boring little one...
I am sure the others have far better technical knowledge of this field...Whistle )
kool-wind
Posted: Wednesday, September 25, 2013 4:30:26 AM

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As far as I am aware, and according to the OED, stemware is AE.

Having said that, a tumbler doesn't have a stem and an English goblet does.
Funnily enough, the French gobelet is a tumbler.Whistle

It is better to travel well than to arrive. Buddha
Tovarish
Posted: Wednesday, September 25, 2013 6:20:05 AM

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I call a goblet a glass that shapes in at the top, and on a stem. A tumbler is a water glass.
thar
Posted: Wednesday, September 25, 2013 6:58:13 AM

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At the risk of threadjacking, I in in a good mood, so that means pictures!

To my nerdy side, this is a goblet



and, yes, this is a tumbler....
OK, I was thinking acrobat, but a rock tumbler is more interesting (it tumbles rocks!)



Sorry, you may now return to answering the question. Whistle
Tovarish
Posted: Wednesday, September 25, 2013 7:04:53 AM

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Those goblet cells do shape in at the top, that looks like a pretty rough cocktail shaker, would possible leave a taint.
thar
Posted: Wednesday, September 25, 2013 8:52:53 AM

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kool-wind wrote:
As far as I am aware, and according to the OED, stemware is AE.

That makes me feel slightly less common for not knowing the word!

Having said that, a tumbler doesn't have a stem and an English goblet does.
Funnily enough, the French gobelet is a tumbler.Whistle


Interesting. I checked the etymology and it is basically something for getting drink down yer gob. Not so classy now, huh!Whistle

goblet (n.) late 14c., from Old French gobelet "goblet, cup," diminutive of gobel "cup," probably related to gobe "gulp down" (see gob).

gob (n.) "a mouthful, lump," late 14c., probably from Old French gobe "mouthful, lump," related to gober "gulp, swallow down," probably from Gaulish *gobbo- (cf. Irish gob "mouth," Gaelic gob "beak"). This Celtic source also seems to be root of gob "mouth" (mid-16c.), which is the first element in gob-stopper "a kind of large hard candy" (1928).
jcbarros
Posted: Wednesday, September 25, 2013 10:01:08 AM

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Shaken, not stirred...
Romany
Posted: Wednesday, September 25, 2013 10:08:32 AM
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Perfection -

Not being American, I had never heard of the words "stemware" or "footed ware" (which actually made me giggle at the thought of little glasses all running around the table and refusing to stay where they should!)

In BE we use the word 'glassware' as a collective and then define which glasses are needed - wine glasses, sherry glasses etc. So we would say we wanted some "Brandy goblets" as brandy/cognac is the only drink which is normally drunk from a goblet these days. Sometimes a speciality or mixed drink might be presented in one of those glasses, but then we would still say it was served in a 'brandy goblet' and not just a 'goblet' purely because, historically, there are other kinds of goblets in existence.
towan52
Posted: Wednesday, September 25, 2013 10:17:15 AM

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Romany wrote:
Perfection -

Not being American, I had never heard of the words "stemware" or "footed ware" (which actually made me giggle at the thought of little glasses all running around the table and refusing to stay where they should!)

In BE we use the word 'glassware' as a collective and then define which glasses are needed - wine glasses, sherry glasses etc. So we would say we wanted some "Brandy goblets" as brandy/cognac is the only drink which is normally drunk from a goblet these days. Sometimes a speciality or mixed drink might be presented in one of those glasses, but then we would still say it was served in a 'brandy goblet' and not just a 'goblet' purely because, historically, there are other kinds of goblets in existence.


Romany, I thought a brandy glass was a "snifter", but I woz edumicated in Essex, that bastion of sophistication with Southend on Sea the broad equivalent of Monte Carlo Whistle

"Today I was a hero. I rescued some beer that was trapped in a bottle"
Romany
Posted: Wednesday, September 25, 2013 10:25:41 AM
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Towan - ah, perhaps you've been away too long and are forgetting your BE!

A 'snifter' is BE slang for any kind of drink, like a "Sundowner". It's only in AE that it means a brandy goblet.
RuthP
Posted: Wednesday, September 25, 2013 10:26:35 AM

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Romany wrote:
Perfection -

Not being American, I had never heard of the words "stemware" or "footed ware" (which actually made me giggle at the thought of little glasses all running around the table and refusing to stay where they should!)

In BE we use the word 'glassware' as a collective and then define which glasses are needed - wine glasses, sherry glasses etc. So we would say we wanted some "Brandy goblets" as brandy/cognac is the only drink which is normally drunk from a goblet these days. Sometimes a speciality or mixed drink might be presented in one of those glasses, but then we would still say it was served in a 'brandy goblet' and not just a 'goblet' purely because, historically, there are other kinds of goblets in existence.

Aaat's OK. I read 'footed ware' as 'footwear'. I was very curious and eager to learn about goblet shoes.

AE does use stemware.

Footed ware, while I would understand the meaning in context is not something I've heard. You do hear people talk about footed glasses, but it's not an everyday use. It might be used to describe something in an auction entry, and perhaps people who deal with tableware in general use the term. The average person, on an average day--no.

Glassware would refer to all glass drinking vessels, with and without feet. In the right context, e.g. talking about glassware as opposed to chinaware, glassware could even refer to glass serving dishes as well--especially of the fancier, cut or pressed glass versions--tableware (yes, that's a real word, too) made out of glass.
towan52
Posted: Wednesday, September 25, 2013 10:38:36 AM

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Romany wrote:
Towan - ah, perhaps you've been away too long and are forgetting your BE!



Y'all probably right!

"Today I was a hero. I rescued some beer that was trapped in a bottle"
thar
Posted: Wednesday, September 25, 2013 11:39:01 AM

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who says a goblet has to be glass?....Whistle

silver, brass, stone, and the good old Indiana Jones goblet of choice -wood!

(although that one didn't actually curve in at the top, so the jury is out on it being a goblet. But definitely a chalice. Or I guess the holy grail can be whatever it wants to be!)
kool-wind
Posted: Wednesday, September 25, 2013 12:02:43 PM

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I have already quoted this once before, but one never tires of Danny Kaye, even if it's got very little to do with the OP.

"The pellet with the poison's in the vessel with the pestle; the chalice from the palace has the brew that is true!"

It is better to travel well than to arrive. Buddha
Tovarish
Posted: Wednesday, September 25, 2013 8:11:19 PM

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Brandy balloon or snifter, shaped in at the top.

Don't forget the olives or cocktail onions!
Kerry.P
Posted: Wednesday, September 25, 2013 8:38:35 PM

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I'm sure I've seen wine glasses with stems but no base/foot. I was told they're to use with pic-stix / picnic-sticks / whatever they're called.

I've even seen #*!% jam-jars, complete with screw tops, on stems with base/foot. What an abomination they are. What would you drink out of a screw-top jam jar?
On second thoughts - don't tell me Silenced , I probably wouldn't want to know. Not talking
Tovarish
Posted: Wednesday, September 25, 2013 11:48:33 PM

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It would depend on how thirsty you were, 'drink it through a dirty sock' desperation. I remember those picnic picks that you stuck in the ground, rather arty-farty.
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Thursday, September 26, 2013 7:53:11 AM

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Aaaggh!

Sacrilege - brandy, with pickled onions (even if they are "cocktail onions")?




Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
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