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Two people, when they love each other, grow alike in their tastes and habits and pride, but their moral natures ... are never... Options
Daemon
Posted: Sunday, May 19, 2013 12:00:00 AM
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Two people, when they love each other, grow alike in their tastes and habits and pride, but their moral natures ... are never welded. The base one goes on being base, and the noble one noble, to the end.

Willa Cather (1873-1947)
Bully_rus
Posted: Sunday, May 19, 2013 12:45:04 AM
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What we may mean by that too broad (canting???) expression - "moral natures"?
Hupomone
Posted: Sunday, May 19, 2013 1:43:05 AM
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If two people have the same tastes, habits, and pride, the two must be base, or noble. Either that or they just get together for the holidays.
Thommy
Posted: Sunday, May 19, 2013 4:15:20 AM

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That's just my opinion,too.I can't imagine,and my experiences have it shown
as well,that two people,as described by Willa Cather,can go on lifelong.
That distinction doesn't even love gap for a long time.
Perhaps it works with an odd rate equal to win the lottery.
Bully_rus
Posted: Sunday, May 19, 2013 4:36:39 AM
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Apart from two people's relations: if there's the Fallen Angel, why can't be Mary Magdalene?
qweer
Posted: Sunday, May 19, 2013 12:36:12 PM
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Daemon wrote:
Two people, when they love each other, grow alike in their tastes and habits and pride, but their moral natures ... are never welded. The base one goes on being base, and the noble one noble, to the end.

Willa Cather (1873-1947)


By reading this I can see that not all quotes that are posted possess a verisimilitude of real life. I would have to think that Ms. Cather's view of people is slightly more pessimistic than mine; unlikely as that may seem.

I find it unimaginable that if Christ were to have had a wife that her morality would remain distorted. I don't know Willa Cather's work;was she a nihilist?
Verbatim
Posted: Sunday, May 19, 2013 1:43:08 PM
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Daemon wrote:
Two people, when they love each other, grow alike in their tastes and habits and pride, but their moral natures ... are never welded. The base one goes on being base, and the noble one noble, to the end.

Willa Cather (1873-1947)


Every saying carries only so much truth, and then only so far.
MTC
Posted: Sunday, May 19, 2013 2:20:27 PM
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Ever consider reading the context of the quoattion to understand its meaning, or is that just too much trouble in the Age of Tweets and limited attention spans?

Boston, February--
MY DEAR HILDA:--

It is after twelve o'clock. Every one else is in bed and I am sitting alone in my study. I have been happier in this room than anywhere else in the world. Happiness like that makes one insolent. I used to think these four walls could stand against anything. And now I scarcely know myself here. Now I know that no one can build his security upon the nobleness of another person. Two people, when they love each other, grow alike in their tastes and habits and pride, but their moral natures (whatever we may mean by that canting expression) are never welded. The base one goes on being base, and the noble one noble, to the end.

The letter is from Alexander, one of Cather's fictional characters in her 1912 novel, Alexander's Bridge, to another fictional character, his mistress, Hilda. (http://www.pagebypagebooks.com/Willa_Cather/Alexanders_Bridge/Chapter_VIII_p2.html)


qweer
Posted: Sunday, May 19, 2013 4:23:45 PM
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MTC wrote:

Ever consider reading the context of the quoattion to understand its meaning, or is that just too much trouble in the Age of Tweets and limited attention spans?

Boston, February--
MY DEAR HILDA:--

It is after twelve o'clock. Every one else is in bed and I am sitting alone in my study. I have been happier in this room than anywhere else in the world. Happiness like that makes one insolent. I used to think these four walls could stand against anything. And now I scarcely know myself here. Now I know that no one can build his security upon the nobleness of another person. Two people, when they love each other, grow alike in their tastes and habits and pride, but their moral natures (whatever we may mean by that canting expression) are never welded. The base one goes on being base, and the noble one noble, to the end.

The letter is from Alexander, one of Cather's fictional characters in her 1912 novel, Alexander's Bridge, to another fictional character, his mistress, Hilda. (http://www.pagebypagebooks.com/Willa_Cather/Alexanders_Bridge/Chapter_VIII_p2.html)



Context was slightly helpful and I'll cop to limited attn span:D
Verbatim
Posted: Sunday, May 19, 2013 8:03:27 PM
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Bully_rus wrote:
What we may mean by that too broad (canting???) expression - "moral natures"?


You got that right, and obviously you found the larger excerpt, thought about it this time, asked the proper question(s).

When Alexander put "whatever we may mean by that canting expression" between parentheses, as he was referring to moral natures never to be welded,
he qualified; by using "that canting expression" he discounted moral natures. How can he say with authority that these moral natures are never welded?
The moral natures which have just been characterized whatever the canting expression may mean?

Cant as a noun means "a slanting or tilted position", or "hypocritically pious language", among other things, some quite base. This free dictionary does not
list "canting" as an adjective, which seems to have been Alexander's choice since he placed it before the noun "expression". However, "canting" is a valid adjective and it means
"affectedly or hypocritically pious or righteous" according to Dictionary.com

I dare not suggest what Alexander meant although I have just re-read the whole chapter in which the letter appears.

Miriam...
Posted: Sunday, May 19, 2013 9:26:53 PM

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Perhaps I should read the whole chapter as well; but within the context that MTC has provided, I think the key sentence in this passage is: "Now I know that no one can build his security upon the nobleness of another person. "Generally speaking, there is no guarantee that a person's actions will always be noble, no matter how compatible--or how loved--one's beloved is; especially if this person, in his or her personal life, is not noble. The only certainty that one has is with one's self. And, even than, we, as fallible human beings, though we may strive toward nobleness, we do not always succeed.
dusty
Posted: Sunday, May 19, 2013 9:57:43 PM

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qweer wrote:

By reading this I can see that not all quotes that are posted possess a verisimilitude of real life. I would have to think that Ms. Cather's view of people is slightly more pessimistic than mine; unlikely as that may seem.

I find it unimaginable that if Christ were to have had a wife that her morality would remain distorted. I don't know Willa Cather's work;was she a nihilist?


I am sure you're right, she probably knows exactly what you mean, it's just that even these days though more so during hers to even mention Magdalene was to admit or imply that the Savior had kissed a person affectionately on the lips, let only got removed his clothes and girded himself with a towel then "began to wash the disciples’ feet, and to wipe them with the towel wherewith he was girded."

So it might not be that Willa Cather wouldn't agree with you, but could only get away with writing so much and manage to still have to show up in print. Even today we have yet to be freed the world from the hands of men undeserving to be in it's control

To be concerned of the fate of the world is not bad, but bearing false witness is to not be
capitán
Posted: Sunday, May 19, 2013 10:30:59 PM

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Though one be base and the other noble,
two people loving each other for a pretty intense and meaningful time have an air of the same person.

Something of themselves is gone in loving the other
and something of the other is assimilated as well.

even though noble and base are never welded,what we do is what we are
and there are people who learn to assimilate and others who don´t.
pedro
Posted: Monday, May 20, 2013 6:29:27 AM

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She is presumptuous in thinking that there are no Base/Base or Noble/Noble loving partnerships. Also is there a difference between same and mixed sex partnerships? Base male-noble female relationships and base female noble male ones? She is speaking of her own experience but I don't believe there is anything universal in her assertion.

All good ideas arrive by chance- Max Ernst
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