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Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Wednesday, June 08, 2016 6:02:08 PM

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The Wee Free Men

No king, no queen, no master.
Wee Free Men.
No king, no queen, no master.
We'll not be fooled again!
Crivens!


Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
MelissaMe
Posted: Wednesday, June 08, 2016 8:43:52 PM

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“Nac Mac Feegle!
The Wee Free Men!
Nae king!
Nae quin!
Nae laird!
Nae master!
We willna' be fooled again!”

― Terry Pratchett, The Wee Free Men

This is my only now.
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Wednesday, June 08, 2016 11:06:59 PM

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It's not obvious, but if you click on the title line in my post, you'll hear the song.
"Wee Free Men" by Steeleye Span in collaboration with Terry Pratchett. It's one song from the album "Wintersmith".



Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
MelissaMe
Posted: Thursday, June 09, 2016 11:36:57 AM

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No! I had no idea! I LOVE Steeleye Span's "One Misty Moisty Morning." I am disappointed with the pronunciation of the words in the song, though. After listening to "Cam Ye O'er Frae France" they could have gotten the words more like my quote above!

This is my only now.
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Thursday, June 09, 2016 2:16:12 PM

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'Ello, 'ello, 'ello, 'ello.

Very true. Though Maddy Prior is from Blackpool (northern England) she can do a fair imitation of broad Scots.

Nae worries. Dinna fesh yersel.

It's probably against EU laws to use broad dialect in song. Whistle Whistle Anxious


Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
Lotje1000
Posted: Thursday, June 09, 2016 2:33:25 PM

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Location: Gent, Flanders, Belgium
Currently reading The Heroes by Joe Abercrombie. Smooth read, unexpected characters. More interesting than the usual fantasy novel.
MelissaMe
Posted: Thursday, June 09, 2016 3:08:10 PM

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Drag0nspeaker wrote:
'Ello, 'ello, 'ello, 'ello.

Very true. Though Maddy Prior is from Blackpool (northern England) she can do a fair imitation of broad Scots.

Nae worries. Dinna fesh yersel.

It's probably against EU laws to use broad dialect in song. Whistle Whistle Anxious


The scunners! Not talking It's a tappin' o' the toes I'm doon!

I grew up reading Uncle Remus, Pogo comic strips, and Pelham Grenville Wodehouse's books - broad dialect doesna' fash me tender li'l sensibilities! Dancing

This is my only now.
kdabber
Posted: Monday, July 18, 2016 1:10:58 PM

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Location: Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, United States
I just finished two.


"True Crime Addict: How I Lost Myself in the Mysterious Disappearance of Maura Murray" by James Renner

and

"Empire of the Summer Moon: Quanah Parker and the Rise and Fall of the Comanches, the Most Powerful Indian Tribe in American History" by S.G. Gwynne


Both were excellent.

Illegitimi Non Carborundum
Shulamit
Posted: Friday, July 22, 2016 1:55:28 AM

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Location: Berkeley, California, United States
Just purchased a binge-fest of books, some older,some current. I seem to be particularly drawn to books in translation. Could be the hunger for other cultures and world views since. I confess to haver travelled outside my home continent. But I also wanted to read those classic authors that I just never got around to, and the idea was to read literature that I resisted when they were assigned, you know: class! Your assignment for tonight is to read pages 1 - 275 of Moby Dick. Tomorrow's homework will be reading pages 276 - 523, so don't get left behind. We have 7 books this semester to finish and you're all going to have to buckle down if you want to pass this class. Book reports on each, and make it snappy! No time for questions. Go go go!!!

I read to savor the words, the structure, the style, the references, the author, the rhythm and sound of the writing, so I read slowly, going back a lot. Impossible to do in the forced march of formal education.

With that in mind, I am now reading, "Gravity's Rainbow," by Thomas Pynchon. Very dense, very deep and powerful. I found a reasonably thorough site that serves as an annotated reference, and I have the iPad close by. Enormously rewarding so far, and will probably get even more so as I go along, that is unless Pynchon runs out of talent after page 103, and then coasts all the way to 902. Unlikely.

Variety is the spice of life. Lack of variety is the spouse of life.
Shulamit
Posted: Friday, July 22, 2016 1:58:25 AM

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Typo iPad Greps, It should have read that I have never travelled outside of my continent.

Variety is the spice of life. Lack of variety is the spouse of life.
Tovarish
Posted: Thursday, August 25, 2016 9:10:37 PM

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Location: Booligal, New South Wales, Australia
I have just finished "The Dressmaker"

Written by Rosalie Ham, this is her first book, previously she worked in an Aged Care Facility.

The Dressmaker is set in the 1950's in country Australia.

the cover says 'a bitter sweet comedy about love, revenge and haute couture'

The Dressmaker was made into a movie staring Kate Winslet, Judy Davis, Liam Hemsworth and Hugo Weaving.

www.dressmakermovie.com
thadson
Posted: Wednesday, August 31, 2016 10:08:05 AM

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Location: Brandon, Florida, United States
The Ancillary Trilogy by Ann Leckie: It is unexpectedly different. Serious, but funny at places, a very unique view with a surprising depth. Not everyone's cup of tea, but it is definitely mine.
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Wednesday, August 31, 2016 10:39:50 AM

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Location: Livingston, Scotland, United Kingdom
thadson wrote:
The Ancillary Trilogy by Ann Leckie: It is unexpectedly different. Serious, but funny at places, a very unique view with a surprising depth. Not everyone's cup of tea, but it is definitely mine.

Hi!
I had not heard of these, but the bits I've just read about them sound great.
"Ancillary Justice received critical praise, won the Hugo Award,[1] Nebula Award, BSFA Award, Arthur C. Clarke Award and Locus Award" - not that I usually go by 'critical acclaim', but any winner of both Hugo and Nebula will be good.

Thanks for your views on them.

Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
MelissaMe
Posted: Wednesday, August 31, 2016 11:39:19 AM

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I had such a hunger to re-read the words of the Nac Mac Feegle I find myself reading the Tiffany Aching set of the Discworld series. =^_______^=

I tried to find a picture of them, but they are all depicted with blue skin - it's supposed to be blue tattoos, not blue skin! The skin is described as nearly solid blue they have so many woad pigmented tattoos. That's not a solid blue. Disappointed I am, I had hoped a good artist with an ability to read had drawn some. d'oh!

Golly, I sure wish a clan of Nac Mac Feegle were my friends!!! Dancing

This is my only now.
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Wednesday, August 31, 2016 1:54:41 PM

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Location: Livingston, Scotland, United Kingdom
I see what you mean - even on the covers of the books . . .





Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
Kecia Sparlin 1
Posted: Thursday, September 01, 2016 2:53:45 PM

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Location: Wichita, Kansas, United States
Methuselah's Children by Robert A. Heinlein. "Starring Lazarus Long" It's the first appearance of this character in Heinlein's novels. The story is pure Heinlein and a pure joy. I just finished Part 1. Starting Part 2, beyond the solar system!
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Friday, September 02, 2016 4:20:15 AM

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Joined: 9/12/2011
Posts: 26,896
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Location: Livingston, Scotland, United Kingdom
Kecia Sparlin 1 wrote:
Methuselah's Children by Robert A. Heinlein. "Starring Lazarus Long" It's the first appearance of this character in Heinlein's novels. The story is pure Heinlein and a pure joy. I just finished Part 1. Starting Part 2, beyond the solar system!

Hi Kecia!
Welcome to the forum.
Gosh, it must be . . . years since I read Methusela's Children. Definitely a classic.
I have no idea how many books I have now read in which Lazarus Long appears - either as the main character or as a 'walk on part' - it must be getting on for forty or fifty books. He's quite a character!
That book was my first introduction to the philosophy of 'tanstaafl' - and, of course, to Mycroft Holmes, Sherlock's brother!


Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
Tovarish
Posted: Friday, September 02, 2016 11:47:55 PM

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Location: Booligal, New South Wales, Australia
I have just finished 'American Sniper', an autobiography by Chris Kyle, I have not seen the movie.
jessaragen
Posted: Wednesday, September 07, 2016 4:38:25 AM

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Location: Manchester, England, United Kingdom
Has anybody heard about Rush by Ive Sylver?
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Friday, September 09, 2016 8:33:46 AM

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Location: Livingston, Scotland, United Kingdom
jessaragen wrote:
Has anybody heard about Rush by Ive Sylver?


Can't say that I have.
Is it good?



Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
MelissaMe
Posted: Friday, September 16, 2016 10:44:22 AM

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The Shepherd's Crown is my current bedtime book. During the day I am reading The White Mouse by Russell Braddon about the WWII spy against the Germans, Nancy Wake. Quite interesting and informative and frequently amusing.

I can recommend it to be read!

This is my only now.
Tovarish
Posted: Sunday, September 18, 2016 4:06:26 AM

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Nancy Wake is an honoured Australian woman, I used her autobiography audio book on one of my 9 hour drives to visit my daughter.
MelissaMe
Posted: Sunday, September 18, 2016 11:04:22 AM

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Tovarish wrote:
Nancy Wake is an honoured Australian woman, I used her autobiography audio book on one of my 9 hour drives to visit my daughter.


Isn't she awesome, though? I wish I was half that brave!!! Applause

This is my only now.
Tovarish
Posted: Sunday, September 18, 2016 9:20:55 PM

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Melissa, even as an elderly woman she was spirited and cheeky, and I am sure that extreme circumstances bring out the best in people.

Thank you for admiring and reading about this Aussie woman.
Priscilla86
Posted: Monday, September 19, 2016 4:33:09 AM

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Two Faces of January by Patricia Highsmith. I always love me some Patricia Highsmith.

The greatest thing you'll ever learn is just to love and be loved in return.
MelissaMe
Posted: Monday, September 19, 2016 10:41:48 AM

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Tovarish wrote:
Melissa, even as an elderly woman she was spirited and cheeky, and I am sure that extreme circumstances bring out the best in people.

Thank you for admiring and reading about this Aussie woman.


I'd never heard of her until I read about her on TFD. After devouring the article, I opened another tab and ordered a copy of The White Mouse through my local library. 😎

This is my only now.
money143
Posted: Thursday, October 20, 2016 5:31:06 PM

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Location: Iquique, Tarapaca, Chile
I am currently reading...
How to Win Friends & Influence People.

Its an amazing book Dancing

What you give power to, has power over you.
Shulamit
Posted: Friday, November 04, 2016 12:59:56 AM

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"Flannery O'Connor: Complete Stories"

Variety is the spice of life. Lack of variety is the spouse of life.
MelissaMe
Posted: Saturday, November 05, 2016 11:41:51 AM

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In light of the new BBC series Dirk Gently's Holistic Detective Agency, I am rereading the book of the same name, and now am reading The Long Dark Teatime of the Soul.

And I can definitively tell you that the series bears about the same resemblance to the book as golf does to billiards. Round white balls. Strike them repeatedly. Balls go into holes. Other than that, rather completely different! Whistle

This is my only now.
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Monday, November 07, 2016 8:37:15 AM

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Location: Livingston, Scotland, United Kingdom
MelissaMe wrote:
Round white balls. Strike them repeatedly. Balls go into holes. Other than that, rather completely different! Whistle

Ah! but . . . holistically, they are connected by the butterfly in Texas which shook its wings and disturbed a butterfly on the next branch, and by the sofa which has been stuck at the bend in my stairs for the past five years . . . I just thought . . . there's also some relationship to table-tennis.
"The impossible has a kind of integrity to it which the merely improbable lacks." (Svlad Cjelli - aka Dirk Gently)

I think you will find that the BBC Cymru series from 2010 has more like the original humour than the American-made TV series.
It's not that Americans can't make TV series, but (as a generality) they don't understand the humour.

The whole mock-up is different.

British:


American:


Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
MelissaMe
Posted: Monday, November 07, 2016 12:20:02 PM

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Ah, but Drag0, it is the disconnectedness to Douglas Adams' book that has me discombobulated about the new series, not its origin nor its humor. But I am watching it. There's a recorded new show waiting for me to be in the mood to watch it. I'm watching the three movies that form The Hobbit, which also has plenty in it for me to criticize! I'm a rather particular person for when it comes to images I wish to permanently store in my brain.

I am rereading the two books to make me happier. =^_^=

And almost all of television isn't fit for petunia fertilizer, no matter what its origin, and about as appetizing as poop peeps.



This is my only now.
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Monday, November 07, 2016 1:03:45 PM

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I understand.

I haven't watched a TV program for three years at least (and then only a couple of quiz/comedy shows a day for a month) - before that it was about thirty-five years.

I occasionally watch a film on DVD or streamed - the last was TLOTR (all of it over a full day in 'installments') - it was actually a good film, but I did notice a few bits 'clashed' with what I remembered of the book - like Old Man Willow was in completely the wrong bit of Middle Earth. It would be impossible to show everything from the six books in five hours or so.

I read - almost all the time. Often action/adventure, just for fun (Eric van Lustbaden, Robert Ludlum, Frederick Forsyth) but also novels based on history - from the Roman/Celtic/Gaelic period, through the Angles, Saxons and Danes, Plantagenets, to the Tudors (not much after that).
It is really obvious where a lot of the inspiration for Middle Earth came from.


Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
MelissaMe
Posted: Saturday, November 19, 2016 3:38:40 PM

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Now I am reading The Innocents Abroad. Very droll, with the witty humor of Twain shining forth.

Quote:
But I digress. The thunder of our two brave cannon announced the Fourth of July, at daylight, to all who were awake. But many of us got our information at a later hour, from the almanac. All the flags were sent aloft except half a dozen that were needed to decorate portions of the ship below, and in a short time the vessel assumed a holiday appearance. During the morning, meetings were held and all manner of committees set to work on the celebration ceremonies. In the afternoon the ship's company assembled aft, on deck, under the awnings; the flute, the asthmatic melodeon, and the consumptive clarinet crippled "The Star-Spangled Banner," the choir chased it to cover, and George came in with a peculiarly lacerating screech on the final note and slaughtered it. Nobody mourned.


This is my only now.
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Saturday, November 19, 2016 5:48:37 PM

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What a brilliant "mis-use" of verbs and adjectives there to really give an aural image of how it sounded. Applause Dancing Applause

Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
Andrew Schultz
Posted: Sunday, December 18, 2016 7:07:05 PM

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Location: Chicago, Illinois, United States
I finished Sherman Alexie's Diary of a Part-Time Indian. I read it because it was on a banned books list.

At the end was a list of resources of a lot of other banned books by authors I'd always sort of wanted to read. This'll be fun.

I particularly enjoy the idiom section of this fine website.
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