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whoopi88
Posted: Wednesday, January 29, 2014 12:05:23 AM

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I'm now reading "The Silmarillion" by J.R.R. Tolkien. I also dreamt about elves last night. Anxious
early_apex
Posted: Thursday, January 30, 2014 3:51:39 PM

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I just finished re-reading Catch-22 by Joseph Heller. I read it for the first time 43 years ago when I was in Vietnam. I had forgotten how dark it got toward the end. I had also forgotten that it had an upbeat ending.

History has now judged it to be a great book, although it never reached best-seller status.
TheParser
Posted: Friday, January 31, 2014 6:20:53 AM
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I am now reading IKE and DICK by Jeffrey Frank.

It describes the "strange political marriage" between President Eisenhower and Vice-President Nixon.

You may remember that it was President Eisenhower who warned that the military and those companies making military equipment were playing too big a role in deciding government policy.

Mr. Nixon eventually became president, but he later became the only president (to date) who has had to resign.

Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Friday, January 31, 2014 12:04:43 PM

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Hi whoopi.

After reading Lord of the Rings, I found Silmarillion rather 'dry' - it is a history rather than an adventure.

Ike and Dick could be a dry history, or an interesting tale (depending on the author).
That's an interesting datum, though I don't think it is only the companies making military equipment, it is the 'umbrella' companies which own all the major multinationals, whether they're making bombs, medicines or Coca-Cola.
The Rockefeller - Dulles - Morgan - Rothschild "friendly society" is well-known for being apolitical. Whistle
whoopi88
Posted: Saturday, February 1, 2014 2:06:07 AM

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Drag0nspeaker wrote:

Hi whoopi.

After reading Lord of the Rings, I found Silmarillion rather 'dry' - it is a history rather than an adventure.

Ike and Dick could be a dry history, or an interesting tale (depending on the author).
That's an interesting datum, though I don't think it is only the companies making military equipment, it is the 'umbrella' companies which own all the major multinationals, whether they're making bombs, medicines or Coca-Cola.
The Rockefeller - Dulles - Morgan - Rothschild "friendly society" is well-known for being apolitical. Whistle


Indeed it is. It took me a while to finish it. The tone that Tolkien used in it is very different from the story-telling that he used in "The Hobbit" and "Lord of the Rings." Am planning to re-read Rand's "Atlas Shrugged" prior to buying a compilation of Lovecraft's works. :D

This forum is very interesting, and I am learning about more and more books that I want to read. :) Thank you!
reinsalkas
Posted: Saturday, February 1, 2014 10:36:02 AM
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Do androids dream of electric sheep? I read already so much about it that I bought it yesterday (in Spanish of course).

Also there other tiles but I will focuss on this one as the primary reading.
arkat17
Posted: Monday, February 3, 2014 12:37:30 AM

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I just finished Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte. It was a great read; I'm glad I got around to perusing the classic. I'm on to her sister Emily Bronte's book Wuthering Heights, and from there just more classics. I watched the movie Jane Eyre to supplement the reading but it didn't do much for me. The book was just so much better, the two didn't compare in the least.
Luker4
Posted: Monday, February 3, 2014 5:29:16 AM

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"It was a great read" it's a typical American phrase isn't it Think or not ?
reinsalkas
Posted: Thursday, February 6, 2014 6:47:15 AM
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reinsalkas wrote:
Do androids dream of electric sheep? I read already so much about it that I bought it yesterday (in Spanish of course).

Also there other tiles but I will focuss on this one as the primary reading.


Well, I finished the novel, so much for it, I guess when it was written it could be considered a "germinal novel" but so many years later I couldn't get into it. Besides I am accustomed to a higher quality of prose, I don't know why I expected that from it though..
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Monday, February 10, 2014 11:53:16 AM

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Well, I don't think Philip K Dick is really famous for his stylish prose.

However, I must admit that this is one time that I found the film more memorable than the book/story.

The visual depiction of the constant gloom and barrenness, plus a few 'classic' scenes, make it re-watchable, for me.
I could watch the 'tear-drops in the rain' soliloquy again and again.
Luker4
Posted: Monday, February 10, 2014 2:42:29 PM

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Do You know Eoin Colfer ?, Artemis Fowl series is very good
Jyrkkä Jätkä
Posted: Monday, February 10, 2014 5:17:48 PM

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Eoin Colfer's And Another Thing..., the sixth book to the five-part trilogy The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy by Douglas Adams, was plain BS.

Artemis Fowl books are good.
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Tuesday, February 11, 2014 5:01:31 AM

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Yes - very good, 'fun' books.

I liked the explanation of the word "leprechaun" - "Lower Elements Police Reconnaissance Unit" (L.E.P. Recon).
Doce
Posted: Thursday, February 13, 2014 8:45:32 AM

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arkat17 wrote:
I'm currently half finished with my first read through of Jane Eyre, and so far, I have found the book quite interesting. I want to finish up soon so I can watch the 2011 movie to supplement my experience. I also like this book because I'm currently trying to expand my vocabulary, and this book offers an abundance of words I can study.

After I finish Jane Eyre I will finish this Alexander Hamilton biography by Ron Chernow, which is also very interesting. Previously read a few weeks back was an anthropology book, "Last Ape Standing" by Chip Walter, which was phenomenal in my opinion. Last but not least is on my list to start in a few weeks is a History of India.


The 2011 movie is not bad, but I really don't see how it could help you 'supplement' your experience. In MY experience, movies have a tendency to block the 'movie' your own imagination has come up with while reading the book. Better re-read the book instead.
Absurdicuss
Posted: Thursday, February 13, 2014 12:51:23 PM

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Most recently I am reading this text message as it is being composed. I don't know how to provide you a more current answer than this live update, Tov.
Alice Liddell
Posted: Friday, February 14, 2014 4:25:02 PM

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Absurdicuss wrote:
Most recently I am reading this text message as it is being composed. I don't know how to provide you a more current answer than this live update, Tov.


[smarty pants-ness intensifies]

Dancing
Absurdicuss
Posted: Friday, February 14, 2014 9:25:47 PM

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Applause
Luker4
Posted: Tuesday, February 18, 2014 11:14:04 AM

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jacobusmaximus
Posted: Tuesday, February 18, 2014 11:37:13 AM

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Conduct Under Fire, by John A Glusman. It's the story of four American doctors and their fight for life as prisoners of the Japanese, 1941-1945.
mapleserum
Posted: Thursday, February 20, 2014 9:31:08 PM

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Thomas De Quincy's Confessions of an English Opium Eater saga.

Walt Whitman's Leaves of Grass.
SJW
Posted: Friday, February 21, 2014 12:54:58 AM

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Burning Chrome (short stories) by William Gibson. I recommend reading it after the Sprawl Trilogy (or at least after the first of the three, Neuromancer), like I did. It makes sense chronologically as well as in terms of understanding some of the concepts.

Today or tomorrow, moving on to Virtual Light (part one of the Bridge trilogy).
whoopi88
Posted: Friday, February 21, 2014 1:03:13 AM

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Just completed the LOTR trilogy again. Taking a break from Tolkien so am re-reading "Good Omens" Terry Pratchett and Neil Gaiman.
Luker4
Posted: Friday, February 21, 2014 1:18:29 PM

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mapleserum
Posted: Friday, February 21, 2014 6:34:48 PM

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SJW wrote:
Burning Chrome (short stories) by William Gibson. I recommend reading it after the Sprawl Trilogy (or at least after the first of the three, Neuromancer), like I did. It makes sense chronologically as well as in terms of understanding some of the concepts.

Today or tomorrow, moving on to Virtual Light (part one of the Bridge trilogy).



Awesome! I have some books to add to my wish list. I read Neuromancer last year, never knew it was a piece of a trilogy.
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Friday, February 21, 2014 9:22:31 PM

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luker and whoopi - Neil Gaiman is rather 'dark' (I think he's brilliantly dark) and Pratchett is funny.
The mixture in "Good Omens" is quite brilliant.

I'm currently on Mark Chadbourne's Sword of Albion - 'alternative history' from the death of Mary, Queen of Scots, through to the Spanish Armada attempt to invade England.
The broad events are all true history, the details are ... different.
The 'hero', Will Swyfte, is a sort of Elizabethan James Bond. "M" and "Q" are replaced by real characters from history, Sir Francis Walsingham and Dr John Dee.
Swyfte has an inherent sadness which he reacts to and hides by "being nonchalant and carefree" in public.

It's good so far.
Jessika
Posted: Sunday, February 23, 2014 1:01:46 AM
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I finally got around to reading Jane Austen's books. Working on reading through Emma right now.

I actually think I like this one better (in some ways I suppose) than Sense and Sensibility.
Doce
Posted: Sunday, February 23, 2014 2:25:24 AM

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Jessika wrote:
I finally got around to reading Jane Austen's books. Working on reading through Emma right now.

I actually think I like this one better (in some ways I suppose) than Sense and Sensibility.



I found Sense and Sensibility boring. My favourite is Pride and Prejudice, but Northanger Abbey is quite entertaining, actually...
Cashh
Posted: Sunday, February 23, 2014 2:39:07 PM
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Hi everybody
I am here to increase my English but sometimes i read English book : I don't know if all is understood but it doesn't matter.
Have you ever read " The last shot" ( D. Frey) It' s a sad story about NBA dream.
As usual correct me
TheParser
Posted: Sunday, February 23, 2014 3:52:24 PM
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I am now reading Reporting the Revolutionary War by Todd Andrlik.

It contains extracts from eighteenth-century American and British newspapers leading up to the American Declaration of Independence.

The most astonishing thing so far is the discovery that in older English, there was another word for "news": "advices."
whoopi88
Posted: Monday, February 24, 2014 3:21:38 AM

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Drag0nspeaker:
I agree that Gaiman is indeed dark, but it suits my taste. I love how he weaves magic and nightmares - two things that, I believe, must always coexist.

I just read that Terry Pratchett was diagnosed with a rare form of Alzheimer’s disease some time last year. This bit of bad news made me really sad. I am a huge fan. I can't wait to find a copy of "Raising Steam."

For now, just like luker4, I am re-reading "Anansi Boys."
Luker4
Posted: Monday, February 24, 2014 11:01:56 AM

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"Fat Charlie nearly said “yes,” but he caught himself in time and simply nodded.
“It is good.” And with that, Mrs. Dunwiddy began to hum tunelessly, in her old old voice which
quavered and faltered.
Miss Noles also began to hum, rather more melodically. Her voice was higher and stronger.
Mrs. Bustamonte did not hum. She hissed instead, an intermittent, snakelike hissing, which seemed
to find the rhythm of the humming and weave through it and beneath it.
Mrs. Higgler started up, and she did not hum, and she did not hiss. She buzzed, like a fly against a
window, making a vibrating noise with her tongue and her teeth as odd and as unlikely as if she had
a handful of angry bees in her mouth, buzzing against her teeth, trying to get out.
Fat Charlie wondered if he should join in, but he had no idea what sort of thing he ought to do if he
did, so he concentrated on sitting there and trying not to be weirded-out by all the noises." Neil Gaiman, ANANSI BOYS

my favourite part
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Monday, February 24, 2014 6:02:32 PM

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Anansi - the Trickster.


Luker4
Posted: Monday, February 24, 2014 6:08:17 PM

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that's a one strange fellow Applause Applause
whoopi88
Posted: Thursday, February 27, 2014 2:26:17 AM

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I just finished Anansi Boys so am moving to this:

rogermue
Posted: Thursday, February 27, 2014 3:35:27 AM

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An interesting novel about conditions in psychiatric institutions with interesting characters. It's too long that I've read that novel so I don't remember anything about style and language. And the film is worth seeing.
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