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What are you reading? Options
Tovarish
Posted: Thursday, January 03, 2013 12:07:49 AM

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Location: Booligal, New South Wales, Australia
I am sure we had this topic some time ago, but couldnt find it in my search.

I wanted to share with you a book I am reading by an Australian author, Tom Keneally.

Tom is an historian as well as an author and has written 28 boks of fiction, 13 non-fiction and 2 childrens books.

This book, 'The Daughters of Mars' is about two women who were nurses in world War 1, it is not a 'girly' book,

and certainly not a dull historical novel.

It is a fasinating recount of the conditions and nursing experiences of that time, as Keneallys'

books are factually founded from the journals of nurses and letters they wrote home.

The description of different campaigns and the tragic loss of lives.

I am half way through so will tell you more.
uuaschbaer
Posted: Thursday, January 03, 2013 9:02:06 PM

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Found it! (Not FounDit)

Currently on the brink of finishing Christopher Hitchens' biography of Thomas Jefferson "Thomas Jefferson: Author of America" though not knowledgeable enough on the subject to comment on the book.

Also Right Ho! Jeeves to while away the minutes on the train, though I don't seem to spend enough of those there to come near to finishing it.

Also Money by Martin Amis but I find mahogany easier to penetrate with a spoon.

Tolstoy's War & Peace, delectable but I still have quite a bit of it left.

*
Tovarish
Posted: Thursday, January 03, 2013 9:59:41 PM

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Location: Booligal, New South Wales, Australia
This book is fasinating with the limited medical supplies they were using with amputations and horrific wounds, ordinary old peroxide and condys crystals andcarbolic soap.

Of course all before anti Bs.

That sounds heavy uus.
excaelis
Posted: Thursday, January 03, 2013 10:31:08 PM

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Location: Toronto, Ontario, Canada
Currently a history of the Knights Templar, next up Macbeth ( I'm assisting my local theatre youth group with some text work ) followed by a history of the Vikings

Sanity is not statistical
LostinSC
Posted: Thursday, January 03, 2013 11:47:26 PM

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next up Macbeth ( I'm assisting my local theatre youth group with some text work


Good for you ex.

Once upon a time... etc.,

I played the "Prince" on stage back in another (early) liftime. (Mid 17th centuary, as I recall, and was hounded by my fellow thespians by the line, "You are amiss, and do not know it".)

I hope your kids, "break a leg", on every performance..

The Knights Templar are not to be admired by what we understand as "civilized" culture.

Losty







The older I grow the more I distrust the familiar doctrine that age brings wisdom. H. L. Mencken
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Friday, January 04, 2013 4:19:03 AM

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Location: Livingston, Scotland, United Kingdom
Losty wrote:
Quote:
The Knights Templar are not to be admired by what we understand as "civilized" culture.


Oh - I don't know.

They were sort of a Christian(ish) version of the IMF, the Swiss Banks and Al Quaida combined.
What's not to admire?

I'm currently reading a pretty awful Sci-Fi book I got free with my new Kindle. The author had a good idea for a new 'slant' (the Earth being a live 'Reality TV' show for bodiless aliens), but the story line is not well put over.
It starts with two dictators at opposite ends of Asia, called Ajadinamad and Kam Jang-Il deciding to nuke each other; with several groups of perfectly ethical Americans (from the CIA to the President's Office, to a bunch of schoolkids) all working miracles to save mankind.
I'll finish it during my daily bus-journeys, but not really to be recommended.


Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
dusty
Posted: Friday, January 04, 2013 5:06:21 AM

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Skipping around through "Jerry of the Islands" and "English Literature for Boys and Girls"

waiting to read instead of skip when the hardcopies arrive sometime next week.

To be concerned of the fate of the world is not bad, but bearing false witness is to not be
Akkuratix
Posted: Friday, January 04, 2013 5:15:01 AM

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Location: Kemi, Lapponia, Finland
Just reading C.Ferguson's Predator Nation.Quite a book, gives much to think about!

Praise a child once a day, let alone your spouse. (and see what happens)
Ray41
Posted: Friday, January 04, 2013 5:45:06 AM

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Location: Orange, New South Wales, Australia
I have pushed my historical novels aside for a spell and I am having a relaxed reading period with Bryce Courtenay's latest, and unfortunately, last novel.
It is "The Jack Of Diamonds", and so far I have only read 2 chapters but, it is in Bryce's usual well researched easy flowing style about a boy growing up in a slum area of Toronto during the depression(story starts about 1930). Ex may know if the area is fact or fiction, or whether it is even known, Cabbage Town is what it is called in the book and, as the author has often used authentic place names in other books, it may well exist?

Bryce Courtenay was the author of "The Power Of One". A fantastic depiction of South Africa under apartheid, and the follow up named "Tandia". I wish he had written a sequel to "Tandia".

Bryce passed away on 22 November, 2012, age 79, from stomach cancer, shortly after completing this last book.

Another good author gone, may he rest in peace knowing that he has brought great pleasure to innumerable readers.

While I live I grow.
Seeker
Posted: Friday, January 04, 2013 1:10:34 PM
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Joined: 3/20/2009
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"The Fine Print: How Big Companies Use "Plain English" to Rob You Blind"
by David Cay Johnston
Tovarish
Posted: Friday, January 04, 2013 5:06:00 PM

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Location: Booligal, New South Wales, Australia
RIP Bryce.

I have read most of his books, but not the one you are reading Ray, keep us posted.
Listening . . .
Posted: Friday, January 04, 2013 5:41:16 PM

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I am (almost) embarrassed to say I'm reading the oh-so-forbidden/exciting Fifty Shades of Grey. I had to find out what all the fuss was about. Good Lord?!?! I am not being enlightened in the way you are Tov, but I am enlightened! Shhh Reading can be for pleasure, as well as educational. Right?
Tovarish
Posted: Friday, January 04, 2013 6:11:16 PM

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Location: Booligal, New South Wales, Australia
How are you going with those fluffy handcuffs Listening, or is that another book?

Enjoy, then tell us all about it, I have not read the book yet.
excaelis
Posted: Friday, January 04, 2013 8:49:22 PM

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Location: Toronto, Ontario, Canada
LostinSC wrote:
next up Macbeth ( I'm assisting my local theatre youth group with some text work


Good for you ex.

Once upon a time... etc.,

I played the "Prince" on stage back in another (early) liftime. (Mid 17th centuary, as I recall, and was hounded by my fellow thespians by the line, "You are amiss, and do not know it".)

I hope your kids, "break a leg", on every performance..

The Knights Templar are not to be admired by what we understand as "civilized" culture.

Losty


Another of my functions with this particular group is fight choreography - so I get to teach them how not to really kill each other while understanding and beautifully enunciating Early Modern English verse drama - WHY OH WHY DO I VOLUNTEER FOR THIS TORTURE ?



( "'cos I love it and I think it's important" says a little voice in my head )

Brick wall Dancing Whistle AngelAnxious Pray







Sanity is not statistical
SilvatungdaViel
Posted: Friday, January 04, 2013 9:14:28 PM

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Location: United States, VA
"The Knights Templar are not to be admired by what we understand as "civilized" culture."


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=s_TwfpFXz6A

'DON'T TREAD ON ME'
Tovarish
Posted: Friday, January 04, 2013 9:15:57 PM

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Joined: 9/2/2009
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Location: Booligal, New South Wales, Australia
Little voices in your head should always be listened to.
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Sunday, January 06, 2013 12:09:07 PM

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Joined: 9/12/2011
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Location: Livingston, Scotland, United Kingdom

Hi Tovarish!
Just to put your mind at rest.

I also had a 'little voice in my head' that said there was an earlier thread "What are you reading now?", but I have gone back, line by line, through the indices of the "Literature", "Grammar" and "Vocabulary" Forums (Fora??, Fori? Fors?) - back in each one to a time before I joined the group - and it is NOT there.

You are not going mad, it was there and someone has stolen it...

I've just finished two 'novellas' by Marion Zimmer Bradley - "Door Through Space" and "The Colours of Space". They were very good. The first seems to be a precursor to the "Darkover" novels. The planet "Wolf" shares many attributes (geographical and cultural) with Darkover.


Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
Jyrkkä Jätkä
Posted: Sunday, January 06, 2013 1:20:22 PM

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Location: Helsinki, Southern Finland Province, Finland
Page 4 in Literature
http://forum.thefreedictionary.com/postst4172_What-s-everyone-reading-.aspx


In the beginning there was nothing, which exploded.
LostinSC
Posted: Sunday, January 06, 2013 3:58:05 PM

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Joined: 9/30/2012
Posts: 400
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"Everything is Obvious*

*once you know the answer.


How Common Sense Fails Us

By
Duncan J. Watts

The older I grow the more I distrust the familiar doctrine that age brings wisdom. H. L. Mencken
Tovarish
Posted: Sunday, January 06, 2013 5:26:27 PM

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Location: Booligal, New South Wales, Australia
Some times they really are out to gets us Drag, ha ha

I have finished the book, wonderful research, the author is to be commended.

The 'War to end All Wars' I can see why they must have believed that.

My Grandfather went snow blind on the Western Front in WW1, conditions not fit for man or beast, or nurses.

The book does not glorify war by any stretch of the imagination, but it helps to be reminded what previous generations endured.
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Monday, January 07, 2013 10:22:38 AM

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Location: Livingston, Scotland, United Kingdom
Thanks JJ - the last 'post' was a few months before I joined.

I must have read it, but never posted in it.


Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
Epiphileon
Posted: Thursday, January 10, 2013 10:14:46 AM

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Joined: 3/22/2009
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"A Universe of Consciousness" One of Gerald Edelman's more recent books explaining his theory of the physiological substrate for consciousness. Straight up stalled on this one at about chapter 6, I suspect there is something missing in my conceptual model of his theory that is responsible for that "deer in the headlights", feeling I get when I try to just read through my confusion. On the other hand, it may be that I just still do not understand the question well enough, to grasp the answer, this book is back-burnered for now, as I think the next one will remedy that.

"Consciousness Explained" Daniel Dennett, thus far, perhaps the most excellent example of the application of rigorous philosophical investigation of the subject I have ever read. I've been reading this book for over 6 months now, taken a number of breaks, to digest, and then return to re-read significant chunks of what I've read so far. His discussion of what he calls Cartesian Materialism, or what happens when you discard dualism but keep the Cartesian theater, is what has me re-examining my working conceptual model of the issue.

"Dragon Riders of Pern" Anne McCaffrey, recreational reading, delightful pure fantasy/sci fi about an odd world where a knightish breed of riders, mount teleporting, telepathic, fire-breathing dragons, to keep their world free of devastating, de-forestation thread like spores that launch from a companion planet in an elliptical orbit.

Question authority. How do you know, that you know, what you know?
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Thursday, January 10, 2013 3:55:59 PM

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Hi Epi!
That sounds a bit beyond me right now - I would need to start with "consciousness and materialism 101" and learn the words. I know 'substrate' and 'physiological', but I thought "Cartesian" was a linguistic theory, or a branch of rectangular vector geometry!

However, I like the Pern series (there are many of them now - I think Anne McCaffrey's son has continued the series). Of course, I like the dragons.

Hi dusty!
Your selection made me realise how much I enjoy fiction "aimed at" an adolescent 'market'.
I'm not sure of the expected age of readers of "English Literature for Boys and Girls", but I bet I would enjoy it.

Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
early_apex
Posted: Thursday, January 10, 2013 5:05:06 PM

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Joined: 4/20/2009
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Location: Spindletop, Texas, United States
"The Confession" by John Grisham. More political than I was hoping for. Also, he paints Texans in a very unflattering light. Fiction yes, but not the entertainment I was seeking.
Prior to that, "The Associate" by John Grisham. That one was entertaining, fairly good plot line, but ended without tying up all the loose ends like I was hoping.
Prior to that, "Surviving Prostate Cancer" by Dr. Patrick Walsh, my new friend. Anxious

"Shut up, she explained." - Ring Lardner
Jyrkkä Jätkä
Posted: Saturday, January 12, 2013 7:18:54 PM

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Mika Waltari - Turms kuolematon (translated into English as "The Etruscan")


In the beginning there was nothing, which exploded.
myriad thoughts
Posted: Friday, February 08, 2013 9:36:22 AM

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Location: Turkey
reading skakerspeare 'cuz his works have caught perfectness . also i read harry potter books and i recommend u to read charlotte bronte.
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Friday, February 08, 2013 12:22:47 PM

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Hello myriad thoughts!

Welcome to the English Forum.

That is a very 'mixed' selection - but I agree they are all good.

Do you read them in English, or translated?


Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
Hope2
Posted: Friday, February 08, 2013 1:17:09 PM

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JJ,

How do you do it? You can always find old posts.

Photographic memory, I bet.

Most of the trouble in the world is caused by people wanting to be important. T. S. Eliot
Wobbles
Posted: Saturday, February 09, 2013 3:23:07 PM
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Location: Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada
I am reading Five Stories by Willa Cather who is an American writer of the early to mid 1900’s. This particular book is a book of short stories that feature the Nebraskan prairie and the world of art. From the technical side of things, I found the stories to be very well written. Author’s use of language is superb and stories are very well crafted. The dialog between characters deserves special mention.

On the content side of things, I found author to be very successful in portraying some large issues of life (love, hope ...) in the lives of ordinary, yet special, people. I found myself eager to read each of the stories and each gave me pause to think about how brave and noble people can be and how life can veer in unexpected, sometimes tragic, directions.

This is the first work of Cather that I’ve read and I must say I will read this author again.

To those on this forum who are just learning English and looking for examples of very written prose, this is a good example of proper use of English.

Joe
Jyrkkä Jätkä
Posted: Saturday, February 09, 2013 5:10:28 PM

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Hope2 wrote:
JJ,

How do you do it? You can always find old posts.

Photographic memory, I bet.


I've been here three and a half years now. I can remember some words used in old threads, especially if I was involved myself.
Sometimes I have used some Finnish term, which helps to utilise the Forum Search.

I can remember you started a thread of Old Sayings for Rogermue as Hope1, and I can remember I used the Finnish phrase "Syvänmeren rysäkeppi" in that thread. Quite easy to search that ;-)



In the beginning there was nothing, which exploded.
Hope2
Posted: Saturday, February 09, 2013 9:48:20 PM

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I remember I searched 'Old Sayings for Rogermue' not too long ago and got nothing.

I just tried again. The exact title also had -'Add Some'

It brought it up under 'exact phrase' instead of 'all words'. I had forgotten that I had issued the invitation.

Most of the trouble in the world is caused by people wanting to be important. T. S. Eliot
almostfreebird
Posted: Saturday, March 09, 2013 1:01:06 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 4/22/2011
Posts: 2,820
Neurons: 7,024
Location: Japan

Light in August - William Faulkner




PS
I could find http://forum.thefreedictionary.com/Old Sayings for Rogermue, Hope1

because I remember the phrase "he could care if..." which I posted.



Tovarish
Posted: Tuesday, March 12, 2013 3:35:58 AM

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Joined: 9/2/2009
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Location: Booligal, New South Wales, Australia
I enjoy the writing of Lee Child, with his character Jack Reacher, but was disappointed to hear the movie to be made on one of his books was

to star Tom Cruise.

Jack Reacher is supposed to be ex-military and 6'6" tall, something the vertically challenged Cruise is not.

What a shame when a character is not portrayed by someone similar to the authors description.

I am still smarting over Richard Chamberlain in the Thorn Birds.
excaelis
Posted: Tuesday, March 12, 2013 3:52:32 AM

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Location: Toronto, Ontario, Canada
Or Shogun ???

Sanity is not statistical
Tovarish
Posted: Tuesday, March 12, 2013 4:00:10 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/2/2009
Posts: 10,876
Neurons: 38,481
Location: Booligal, New South Wales, Australia
What a shocker, maybe we shouldnt read the books before we see the movies?
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