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MASAKARI: The people's choice 'General Purpose Grade' English wordlist Options
Sanmayce
Posted: Saturday, September 28, 2013 11:14:14 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 5/29/2012
Posts: 193
Neurons: 975
Location: Sofia, Sofia-Capital, Bulgaria
>... professor of letters ...
Yes, yet your statement seems like overkill to me, I mean 'man of letters' suffices, literate men of old were much much more rooted in their work and appreciative compared to today's educated fools, I believe that.
Few hundred meters from the place where I live there were a monastic church with scriptorium, a one thousand years old complex. Kind of pre-Gutenbergian publishing house for books/scrolls all hand-written, sadly long gone.
Sometimes in my contemplations I feel the power of those dedicated to power of letters men.
As for nowadays publishers, most of them are pimps no matter how elevated they think they are, why, simply because there is one UNWRITTEN LAW: '(Written) LOGOS cannot be polluted/charged with money.'
Likewise, the getting pimped guys (so called writers) receiving their share of the 'bargain' are no better, some of them are females i.e. pimpesses making even billions and thinking they have grabbed GOD by the coat, but guess what, this is an abomination sanctioned by 'THE "HUMAN" LAW'.
Of course, there were true 'men of letters' like Nietzsche/Traven who, in their own words, were mere mediums of the words, explaining how words wanted to ride on them:
"... for they want to ride upon thy back." /F.Nietzsche/
"The creative person should have no other biography than his works." /B.Traven/

I'm living in an age
That calls darkness light
Though my language is dead
Still the shapes fill my head

/Peter Gabriel/

HERITAGE shines here:
Logos
n.
1. Philosophy
a. In pre-Socratic philosophy, the principle governing the cosmos, the source of this principle, or human reasoning about the cosmos.
b. Among the Sophists, the topics of rational argument or the arguments themselves.
c. In Stoicism, the active, material, rational principle of the cosmos; nous. Identified with God, it is the source of all activity and generation and is the power of reason residing in the human soul.
2. Judaism
a. In biblical Judaism, the word of God, which itself has creative power and is God's medium of communication with the human race.
b. In Hellenistic Judaism, a hypostasis associated with divine wisdom.
3. Christianity In Saint John's Gospel, especially in the prologue (1:1-14), the creative word of God, which is itself God and incarnate in Jesus. Also called Word.


And to illustrate the inner strength behind these words:

He often used to speak of the ecstatic mood in which he wrote "Zarathustra"; how in his walks over hill and dale the ideas would crowd into his
mind, and how he would note them down hastily in a note-book from which he would transcribe them on his return, sometimes working till
midnight. He says in a letter to me: "You can have no idea of the vehemence of such composition," and in "Ecce Homo" (autumn 1888) he
describes as follows with passionate enthusiasm the incomparable mood in which he created Zarathustra:-
"--Has any one at the end of the nineteenth century any distinct notion of what poets of a stronger age understood by the word inspiration? If
not, I will describe it. If one had the smallest vestige of superstition in one, it would hardly be possible to set aside completely the idea that
one is the mere incarnation, mouthpiece or medium of an almighty power. The idea of revelation in the sense that something becomes
suddenly visible and audible with indescribable certainty and accuracy, which profoundly convulses and upsets one
--describes simply the
matter of fact. One hears-one does not seek; one takes--one does not ask who gives: a thought suddenly flashes up like lightning, it comes
with necessity, unhesitatingly--I have never had any choice in the matter. There is an ecstasy such that the immense strain of it is
sometimes relaxed by a flood of tears, along with which one`s steps either rush or involuntarily lag, alternately. There is the feeling that one
is completely out of hand, with the very distinct consciousness of an endless number of fine thrills and quiverings to the very toes;--there is a
depth of happiness in which the painfullest and gloomiest do not operate as antitheses, but as conditioned, as demanded in the sense of
necessary shades of colour in such an overflow of light. There is an instinct for rhythmic relations which embraces wide areas of forms
(length, the need of a wide-embracing rhythm, is almost the measure of the force of an inspiration, a sort of counterpart to its pressure and
tension). Everything happens quite involuntarily, as if in a tempestuous outburst of freedom, of absoluteness, of power and divinity. The
involuntariness of the figures and similes is the most remarkable thing; one loses all perception of what constitutes the figure and what
constitutes the simile; everything seems to present itself as the readiest, the correctest and the simplest means of expression. It actually
seems, to use one of Zarathustra`s own phrases, as if all things came unto one, and would fain be similes: `Here do all things come
caressingly to thy talk and flatter thee, for they want to ride upon thy back. On every simile dost thou here ride to every truth. Here fly open
unto thee all being`s words and word-cabinets; here all being wanteth to become words, here all becoming wanteth to learn of thee how to
talk.` This is MY experience of inspiration. I do not doubt but that one would have to go back thousands of years in order to find some one
who could say to me: It is mine also!--"


'PARAGON WORDING' I call above section.
"Everything happens quite involuntarily, as if in a tempestuous outburst of freedom, of absoluteness, of power and divinity." - pretty Taoistic wording.

Another thing, the guys at Wiktionary made two very useful prefix/postfix webpages, here.

Thanks to their important lists 'leprechaun' gets postfixed furthermore:

-cephalous HERITAGE: -cephalous suff. Having a specified kind of head or number of heads: dicephalous.
-cephaly HERITAGE: -cephaly suff. A specified condition of the head: microcephaly.

SOED says:
micrencephaly, noun.
L19.
[from MICRO- + Greek egkephalos brain + -Y3.]
Medicine. The condition of having a small brain. Also, microcephaly.


#091: leprechauncephaly similar to micrencephaly !?

SOED says:
microcephalic, adjective & noun. M19.
[from MICRO- + -CEPHALIC.]
Chiefly Medicine & Anthropology.
A. adjective. Having an abnormally small head or skull. M19.
B. noun. A microcephalic person. L19.

* microcephalism noun = microcephaly M19.
* microcephalous adjective = MICROCEPHALIC adjective M19.
* microcephalus noun, pl. -li, (a) = MICROCEPHALIC noun; (b) = microcephaly: M19.
* microcephaly noun microcephalic condition M19.


#092: leprechaunOcephalic similar to microcephalic
#093: leprechaunOcephalism similar to microcephalism
#094: leprechaunOcephaly similar to microcephaly

SOED says:
cynocephalus, noun. Pl. -li. ME.
[Latin from Greek kunokephalos adjective = dog-headed, formed as CYNO- + kephalU head.]
1. A member of a fabled race of men with dogs' heads. ME.
2. A baboon or other primate having a doglike head. obsolete exc. as mod. Latin name of a genus of Asian flying lemurs. E17.

* cynocephalous, adjective: dog-headed M19.


#095: leprechaunOcephalus similar to cynocephalus
#096: leprechaunOcephali similar to cynocephali
#097: leprechaunOcephalous similar to cynocephalous

-nomy HERITAGE: -nomy suff. A system of laws governing or a body of knowledge about a specified field: aeronomy.
-nomics

SOED has:
organonomy, noun. rare. E19.
[from Greek ORGANON + -NOMY.]
The branch of knowledge that deals with the laws of organic life.
* organonomic adjective M19.


#098: leprechaunonomy similar to organonomy
#099: leprechaunonomic similar to organonomic

-philiac
-philic

HERITAGE says:
necrophilia also necrophilism
n.
1. Obsessive fascination with death and corpses.
2. Erotic attraction to or sexual contact with corpses.
necrophiliac adj. & n.
necrophile n.
necrophilic adj.


#100: leprechaunophilism similar to necrophilism
#101: leprechaunophiliac similar to necrophiliac adj. & n.
#102: leprechaunophilic similar to necrophilic adj.

HERITAGE says:
lepto- or lept-
pref.
Slender; thin; fine: leptocephalus.

SOED says:
Greek 'leptos' means fine, small, thin, delicate.

HERITAGE says:
leprechaun
n.
One of a race of elves in Irish folklore who can reveal hidden treasure to those who catch them.
[Irish Gaelic luprachán, alteration of Middle Irish luchrupán, from Old Irish luchorpán : luchorp ( lú-, small; see legwh- in Indo-European roots + corp, body from Latin corpus; see kwrep- in Indo-European roots) + -án, diminutive suff.]


SOED says:
leprechaun, noun. E17.
[Irish leipreachán alt. of Middle Irish luchrupán alt. of Old Irish luchorpán, from lu small + corp body.]
In Irish folklore, a small, usu. mischievous being of human form, often associated with shoemaking or buried treasure.


Inevitably certain words are marginal, I won't be surprised if the number reaches 140.
My point: it is very useful/important to have an English prefixes/suffixes rich list especially during wildcard searchings.

After some tweaks, _GW.zip package has been updated to r.1+++, now 156MB.



Also I 1-grammed 'enwiktionary-20130919-pages-articles.xml' a 3.12GB file to 'enwiktionary-20130919-pages-articles.xml.01.txt.sorted' 197MB, included in _GW.ZIP as shown on screenshot above.

Also in the package the spell-checked 'Wiktionary_headwords_2012.txt.html' is included, browsing and picking new words (to MASAKARI) now is a CAKEWALK.

With horror I found that MASAKARI r.6 misses the fantastic word 'Jamiroquai' - not a mere word but a person (Jay Kay, the frontman) one of my favorite artists.
"The band name is a portmanteau of "jam session" and "iroquai", based on the Iroquois, a Native American tribe." /Wikipedia/



HERITAGE defines:
portmanteau word
n.
A word formed by merging the sounds and meanings of two different words, as chortle, from chuckle and snort.
Word History: "'O frabjous day! Callooh! Callay!' He chortled in his joy." Perhaps Lewis Carroll would chortle a bit himself to find that people are still using the word chortle, which he coined in 'Through the Looking-Glass', published in 1872. In any case, Carroll had constructed his word well, combining the words chuckle and snort. This type of word is called a blend or a portmanteau word. In 'Through the Looking-Glass' Humpty Dumpty uses portmanteau to describe the word slithy, saying, "It's like a portmanteau—there are two meanings packed up into one word" (the meanings being "lithe" and "slimy").


Hey Leon, I salute you with one of my favorite Jamiroquai's performances:

JAMIROQUAI - "Love Foolosophy" LYRICS

Baby baby, I feel these sweet sensations
Honey honey, looks like a superstar
She's got a promise of lovestruck fascination

What am I to do? How am I to know?
Who you are

And this love foolosophy is killing
Previous illusions that
I had in my mind about you
It seems so true, all the lies you're telling
Tragically compelling and
My love it means nothing to you
So maybe I'm still a love fool

She shimmers like a California sunset
Lady lady, glitters but there's no gold, no no no no no
She carries sweetly infectious magic formulas
I'm so delirious, is she that serious?
Bringing me on, I've been waiting so long

I don't want to be a love fool
I don't want the world I want you


Wut-wut, 'tragically compelling' an outstanding wording, love it.

While reading one interesting article ('supercomputer simulates 1 second of brain activity') 7 new words (terabyte,teraflops,terascale,petabyte,petaflops,petascale,exabyte,exaflops,exascale) came up.

gigabyte
n.
1. A unit of computer memory or data storage capacity equal to 1,024 megabytes (2^30 bytes).
2. One billion bytes.

tera-
pref.
One trillion (10^12): terahertz.

peta-
pref.
One quadrillion (10^15): petahertz.

petabyte
n.
1. A unit of computer memory or data storage capacity equal to 1,024 terabytes (2^50 bytes).
2. One quadrillion bytes.

exa-
pref.
One quintillion (10^18): exahertz.

Along with SOED 1000+ new words 'quiverings/Taoistic/webpages/Jamiroquai/Jamiroquaiesque/Jamiroquaiesquely/slithy/terabyte/petabyte/petaflops/petascale/exabyte/exaflops/exascale/exahertz' are to be added in r.7.

Also, my wish is to go 2 steps ahead i.e. to go, beyond PAGODA order 7, to order 9, for now an unrealistic one because 9*(9+1)/2 = 45 subtiers are scary as far as size (PAGODA order 5 tiers files are 1.23GB/13GB compressed/decompressed) is concerned.
Nevertheless, sharing GW r.1+++ makes me happy, it is a 'warhorse' (or rather 'superdonkey') package - one reliable sidekick/fulcrum, enjoy!

He learns not to learn and reverts to what all men pass by.
Sanmayce
Posted: Monday, September 30, 2013 12:54:46 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 5/29/2012
Posts: 193
Neurons: 975
Location: Sofia, Sofia-Capital, Bulgaria
Below my quick attempt to illustrate the smooth transition from 'exascale' 1-gram to 'exascale' 2/3/4/5-grams, thanks to the PAGODA order 5 (for text below), is given:

Fujitsu supercomputer simulates 1 second of brain activity
Harnessing more than 82,000 processors on the world's fourth-ranked supercomputer,
scientists run an experiment that represents 1 percent of human brain activity.
by Tim Hornyak
August 5, 2013 2:22 PM PDT

Is it really possible to simulate the human brain on a computer?
AI researchers have been investigating that question for decades,
but Japanese and German scientists have run what they say is the largest-ever simulation of brain activity using a machine.

The simulation involved 1.73 billion virtual nerve cells connected by 10.4 trillion synapses and was run on Japan's K computer,
which was ranked the fastest in the world in 2011.

It took the Fujitsu-built K about 40 minutes to complete a simulation of one second of neuronal network activity in real time,
according to Japanese research institute RIKEN, which runs the machine.

The simulation harnessed the power of 82,944 processors on the K computer,
which is now ranked fourth on the biannual international Top500 supercomputer standings (China's Tianhe-2 is the fastest now).

Each synapse between excitatory neurons had 24 bytes of memory for greater accuracy.
The simulation ran on open-source NEST software and had about 1 petabyte of main memory,
which is roughly equal to the memory of 250,000 PCs.

The synapses were randomly connected and the process was meant only to "test the limits of the simulation technology developed in the project and the capabilities of K," RIKEN said in a release.

The K computer is housed at RIKEN's Advanced Institute for Computational Science in Kobe, Japan,
and has a rated performance of 10.51 petaflops per second using 705,024 SPARC64 processing cores.

"If petascale computers like the K computer are capable of representing 1 percent of the network of a human brain today,
then we know that simulating the whole brain at the level of the individual nerve cell and its synapses will be possible with exascale computers hopefully available within the next decade," Markus Diesmann of the Institute of Neuroscience and Medicine at Germany's Forschungszentrum Julich said in the release.

An exascale computer is a machine capable of calculating a quintillion floating-point operations per second,
a thousandfold increase over basic petascale speeds.

Some researchers have speculated that exascale computing may be achieved by 2020, but others disagree.

An expert group within Japan's science ministry is already planning an exascale machine that would have 100 times the processing capacity of the K computer.
It's apparently going to be used for quake simulation and prediction and is slated for completion by around 2020.

Topics: Science
Tags: neuroscience, K computer, exascale, RIKEN, computing, Fujitsu, Top500, supercomputer, Japan

About Tim Hornyak: Crave freelancer Tim Hornyak is the author of "Loving the Machine: The Art and Science of Japanese Robots." He has been writing about Japanese culture and technology for a decade.


/Source: www.cnet.com/

Having the environment of a single word (its usage within the phrases/sentences) is the richest resource one can get, isn't it!
Dictionaries provide 'examples' i.e. sentences with a particular entry of theirs, however even the precious OED (boasting 2,000,000 examples/sentences) is no match to the OCEANS of contexts/sentences/phrases scattered through [e]books/[e]magazines/[e]papers. And it can not be otherwise because dictionaries resemble BUCKETs, they are bound to be limited. Many times I need the allowed prepositions for a certain word, then looking in some entry (headword with definition) I find only partial view of the picture, the cases of 'run'+'on' and 'housed'+'at' are such.







Can anyone share how he/she sees the COMPLEMENTING/AUGMENTING process of getting the richest possible usage for a single word?


He learns not to learn and reverts to what all men pass by.
Sanmayce
Posted: Monday, December 02, 2013 12:54:49 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 5/29/2012
Posts: 193
Neurons: 975
Location: Sofia, Sofia-Capital, Bulgaria
Happy I am to share my latest (revision 2) Gallowwalker, here .

What is new?
Several improvements in Kazahana (the project's sweetheart/searchheart), also adding the ability to create PAGODAs by pressing a single button.

The most used regime/mode of searching (out of the three Exact/Fuzzy/Wildcard) is Wildcard, in previous revisions it was covered by 9 wildcards giving firm grip over the pattern, but I was not happy of speed performance so 2 new wildcards have been added boosting up the traversal speed by 100+%.
Instead of searching into Wikipedia lines at 60-80MB/s now speeds are in range 130-180MB/s, these results are obtained on my Core 2 laptop with 2 threads.
To achieve this, I had to write the fastest wildcard matching function, an etude in C working iteratively instead of recursively.

For more info, my article describing the three powerful modes at 'codeproject', here.



Wut-wut! Yesterday reading how Samsung broke the 6Gb/s ~ 600MB/s barrier of SATA III interface (the one that connects your SSD to RAM) thus blowing away the other SSD drives I thought "Korean guys paved the way for further sweet speed boosts".
Immediately my next thought was what speed performance one modern laptop with 8 threads and such drive could offer, the simple math is, 8threads (working on 2200MHz) * 66MB/s = 528MB/s nearly the maximum throughput of modern SSD drives.
It means that with Gallowwalker r.2 you can traverse (search as full-text) Wikipedia at 528+MB/s for patterns like "&metal&fatigue&" which is bonbonesque.

I have already seen one 'hi-end' laptop with 16 threads but only with 16GB memory, my wish is to see Kazahana traversing Wikipedia on similar machine but with 64GB (thus all read operations will be cached), a computer for hardcore text explorers allowing Wikipedia wildcard searches at 1+GB/s, muffinesquely sweet.


He learns not to learn and reverts to what all men pass by.
Sanmayce
Posted: Thursday, December 12, 2013 11:59:11 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 5/29/2012
Posts: 193
Neurons: 975
Location: Sofia, Sofia-Capital, Bulgaria
A lovely song goes:
...
Surrendering there
Escaping the dark
Into the arms of a great protector
My chrysalis heart
My chrysalis heart
My chrysalis heart
...

SOED defines 'chrysalis' as noun whilst 'chrysaline/chrysaloid/chrysalid' as adjectives.

HERITAGE holds:
chrysanthemum n.
1. Any of numerous, mostly Eurasian plants of the genus Chrysanthemum in the composite family, many of which are cultivated as ornamentals for their showy radiate flower heads.
2. A flower head of one of these plants.
[Latin chrȳsanthemum, from Greek khrūsanthemon, gold flower : khrūs-, khrūso-, chryso- + anthemon, flower (from anthos).]


Pretty, 'Golden Flower', instantly I asked myself whether 'Golden Heart' is what the lyrics are about, initially I thought that 'chrysalis' stands for 'undeveloped yet'.
To me, 'chrysalis heart' is a beautiful add-on to my corpus of golden 2-grams meaning two things in the same time:
- 'golden heart' or more loosely 'PRECIOUS HEART';
- 'protective heart' or 'protectordom' or more loosely 'STRENGTH WITHIN'.

Finally, an extra powerful search mode has been added to the arsenal of gunhitters - EF mode standing for 'Exhaustive Fuzzy'.

Screenshot #1:

Screenshot #2:


Sometimes for hardcore text searchers, like me, there is no use of shooting around with light-weight guns i.e. a heavy big-caliber gun has to be used instead in order to hit multiple targets with one shot covering an area with radius LD (Levenshtein Distance).
Situation like this is when I have multiple keywords bounded together forming a context, in next example I need all contexts/lines resembling as close as possible the pattern:
Project Icarus, a design study of an interstellar spacecraft based on Project Daedalus

Simply, I need contexts/lines of all appearances of similar (only looking like) patterns within some fuzzy number.

And this really heavy example which I ran on my laptop using Wikipedia 1GB dump:
HIT: "* [[Project Icarus (Interstellar Probe Design Study)]], a design study of an interstellar spacecraft based on Project Daedalus"
PATTERN: "Project Icarus, a design study of an interstellar spacecraft based on Project Daedalus"

In the end, one hit only, 2,527,966,497 targets (possible hits) were under fire.
The Levenshtein Distance was 13 and the needed time was 38 minutes.

By the way, the Gallowwalker's 'Search Heart' Kazahana is now compiled with latest Intel C Optimizer - version 14.0 - a golden product given for free evaluation, thank you Intel.
Greediness in me commands to quadruple Kazahana's hexadecadness, thus newest Intel processors could handle natively those 64 threads, still no such machine in my reach.

For those English language explorers who are going to buy a new PC, a hint from me:
Don't be fooled by ads, buy octad-threaded machine as a minimum, powerful word-calculator as Gallowwalker needs ... power.

He learns not to learn and reverts to what all men pass by.
leonAzul
Posted: Friday, December 13, 2013 5:59:02 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 8/11/2011
Posts: 7,965
Neurons: 25,156
Location: Miami, Florida, United States
Sanmayce wrote:
A lovely song goes:
...
Surrendering there
Escaping the dark
Into the arms of a great protector
My chrysalis heart
My chrysalis heart
My chrysalis heart
...

SOED defines 'chrysalis' as noun whilst 'chrysaline/chrysaloid/chrysalid' as adjectives.

HERITAGE holds:
chrysanthemum n.
1. Any of numerous, mostly Eurasian plants of the genus Chrysanthemum in the composite family, many of which are cultivated as ornamentals for their showy radiate flower heads.
2. A flower head of one of these plants.
[Latin chrȳsanthemum, from Greek khrūsanthemon, gold flower : khrūs-, khrūso-, chryso- + anthemon, flower (from anthos).]


Pretty, 'Golden Flower', instantly I asked myself whether 'Golden Heart' is what the lyrics are about, initially I thought that 'chrysalis' stands for 'undeveloped yet'.
To me, 'chrysalis heart' is a beautiful add-on to my corpus of golden 2-grams meaning two things in the same time:
- 'golden heart' or more loosely 'PRECIOUS HEART';
- 'protective heart' or 'protectordom' or more loosely 'STRENGTH WITHIN'.

Part of the power of poetry is its ability to have meaning on more than one level. The use of the word "chrysalis" here is a good example of this.

As a metaphor, the chrysalis is often used to represent a transformation. It literally refers to the the structure in which many insects are transformed from the pupa to the imago (adult) stages. Unlike the cocoon, which has a similar function but is made of opaque silken threads, the chrysalis has a translucent membrane that gives it its golden hue and glister.

I might also observe that the words chrysalis and psyche have a great deal of history together. In particular, the meaning of psyche as a literal butterfly is interwoven with its meaning as a metaphor for the human spirit.


"Make it go away, Mrs Whatsit," he whispered. "Make it go away. It's evil."
Sanmayce
Posted: Friday, December 13, 2013 7:55:51 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 5/29/2012
Posts: 193
Neurons: 975
Location: Sofia, Sofia-Capital, Bulgaria
Very good point Leon, I didn't make the connection.

SOED defines:
psyche, noun

M17.
[Latin from Greek psukhU breath, life, soul, mind (also butterfly, moth), rel. to psukhein breathe; in some uses with allus. to PsukhU Psyche, in Greek mythol. the beloved of Eros (Cupid), the god of love.]
I.
1. The soul, the spirit. Formerly also (rare), the animating principle of the universe. Now chiefly Hist. M17.
2. The mind, esp. in its spiritual, emotional, and motivational aspects; the collective mental or psychological characteristics of a nation, people, etc. E20.
II.
3. [After Greek.] A butterfly, a moth. rare. E19.
III.
4. [Said to be after Raphael's painting of Psyche.] A cheval-glass. Also psyche-glass. arch. M19.
Comb.: psyche-glass: see sense 4 above; Psyche knot = GRECIAN knot.


Also, the beautiful play of patterns and colors is what our old test-word 'psychedelicize' and 'butterfly' have in common.

psychedelicize verb trans. (colloq.) make psychedelic or bizarrely colourful M20.

At http://www.thefreedictionary.com/psyche we have:

[1650–60; < Latin psȳchē < Greek psȳchḗ literally, breath, derivative of psychein to breathe, blow]


Leon, I made the connection between 'wind' & 'soul' long ago, however many "literate" specialists refuse to acknowledge the spirituality behind 'wind/breath/blow' and 'anima/soul', such erudites make me sick.
I find fascinating the oldest (and maybe the purest) human beliefs that behind every material thing stands a living entity.

He learns not to learn and reverts to what all men pass by.
Sanmayce
Posted: Tuesday, February 18, 2014 1:26:50 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 5/29/2012
Posts: 193
Neurons: 975
Location: Sofia, Sofia-Capital, Bulgaria
I asked myself how many unfamiliar words to MASAKARI some new magazines hold?

- MIT TECHNOLOGY REVIEW Vol. 117
- Scientific American, JANUARY 2014
- sky & telescope, DECEMBER 2013
- COMPUTER SHOPPER, MARCH 2014
- MAXIMUMPC, FEB 2014
- NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC MAGAZINE, FEBRUARY 2014
- BSD, DECEMBER 2013
- Samsung Galaxy Tips, Tricks, Apps & Hacks, Volume 2 2014

MIT TECHNOLOGY REVIEW:
In richer countries, everyone’s genomes will be decoded.
Cheap Genomics
UPFRONT
Brain-Inspired Chip Helps Smartphones Spot Faces
serious journalism in magazines and on websites and
and reducing the amount of food crops used for biofuels.
Today, because examining the whole genome has been so costly, most clinical and research labs look only at the exome, the roughly 1.5 percent of the genome associated with known functions.
Sequencing the entire genome typically finds hundreds of times as much variation between any two individuals as just sequencing their exomes,
a professor of materials and energy technologies at Harvard University, who led the work, says the quinones will cut the cost of energy storage materials
organic molecules instead of the metal ions usually used.
which 3M is producing for device makers, use nanotechnology from a startup called Cambrios.
The researchers face competition from other startups developing cheaper flow batteries,
The original DARPA challenge for autonomous vehicles basically came down to waypoint following and
You can even send scans as emails – all without ever turning on a computer.
The nanoparticles divert immune cells away from the heart and toward the spleen, where they die.
Curated tech stories from across the Web
Making matters tougher, the potential for microarrays seemed limited once more
Begins selling genotyping services to researchers
You made an early decision to use small batteries, similar to the kind used in laptops,
A gumball machine at the entrance declares it an entrepreneurial space.
Kickstarter Keeping crowdfunding pure, it won’t let donors get equity in startups.
it’s more energy efficient, a bulb lasts many years, and it’s dimmable.
and technologies like hydrofracking have led to a surge
the shape of a nanowire changes the way it interacts with methane,
2 square millimeters: size of a Freescale chip that has a processor, memory, and other functions
But for amputees like Spetic, these are more tools than limbs.
replacing lab equipment to deliver signals.
including TALENs and optogenetics, a technique that involves controlling neuron activity with laser light.
This machinery hums in the background of our financial lives,
and where employees badged into buildings,
widely regarded as a social network for grownups,
its software too immature, and the whole concept too geeky for it to be a successful mass-market product.
Next were the winners of a microblogging contest
Explorers give advice to newbies and
These clandestine computers gave their wearers superhuman capabilities,
proudly called themselves “cyborgs.”
How do you de-geekify a smartphone for your face?
each properly vetted for enthusiasm and street cred.
voice-activated texting or e-mailing is one of the most mentally distracting activities
Even nondrivers are likely to find
to be pressure for adult-themed software.
dramatic advancements in the field of neuroengineering,
not only describing how the so-called cryptocurrency would work
practical joke played by clever cyberlibertarian coders
What can you do with bitcoins, or with cryptocurrencies in general?
60 such pallets to serve a village of 200 people in a poor country.
traditional bulbs over a lifespan of 50,000 hours.

Scientific American:
The mammoths and other megafauna
You don’t hear about axions as much because it has proved somewhat harder to detect them
compiled the new rankings after surveying more than 2,000 sites
SITES ON THE UNRANKED LIST APPEAR IN ALPHABETICAL ORDER
Using sediments from four mercury hotspots, the scientists measured
The South American dinosaur Argentinosaurus huinculensis would have had a hard time getting around.
the researchers found that social pairings between individuals
brain regions activated by the unconscious cues that affect our behaviors and judgments.
Moons orbiting distant exoplanets may account for most of the habitable locales in the galaxy.
how feasible it would be for an exomoon to possess an Earth-like environment.
He may not find as many exomoons as he would with a quick search of lots of targets,
renewables such as hydroelectricity are maxed out,
of all energy worldwide—roughly 2.4 yottajoules
ituminous coals and lignites reached the highest share
the same stuff that often makes geodes and petrified wood so colorful.
proteins make vinculin — a protein that helps cells attach to surfaces
Slice up the stem of a Syagrus comosa palm, look at it under a microscope,
The “eyeholes” are tubes of xylem that transport water.
The device repurposes one of the nation’s premier atom smashers, the SLAC linear accelerator,
The illuminated matter reaches a temperature in excess of one million kelvins,
what the Large Hadron Collider at CERN near Geneva is to elementary particle physics: a way to smash the building blocks of nature with tremendous amounts of energy,
using synchrotron x-rays to study the deep interior of atoms, molecules and nanosystems.
Undulators consist of a series of magnets that generate alternating magnetic fields.
to record diffraction patterns of nanocrystals, proteins and viruses
With pulses as short as 0.1 femtosecond (100 attoseconds, or quintillionths of a second),
Femtosecond X-ray Protein Nanocrystallography.
Observational evidence supported a competing cosmology — the “geoheliocentrism” of Tycho Brahe.
a bunch of closed-minded Einsteinians toeing a line dictated by tradition and authority?
This new “geoheliocentric” cosmology had two major advantages going for it
This “Tychonic” system retained the advantages of geocentrism.
in eons past had very little if any of this life-giving gas,
each of which would mean big paydays for different industries.
A worker then zaps him with a cattle prod.
all find themselves dissected (nonnecrophilously) within
Don’t assume that the objectophile’s love for that new iPhone 5S feels sadly but necessarily unrequited, either.
but what you and your pickup share is a pale imitation of the true, deep and abiding intimacy experienced by objectophiles.
Objectophilia extends beyond mere consumer products.
hogs, snakes, toads, lizzards,
Researchers, by mining public Twitter data, have found that a meme’s “virality” is often evident from the start.
“We didn’t expect to see that the viral memes were going to behave very differently from nonviral memes at their beginnings,”
Node size corresponds to number of tweets using a specific hashtag (text indicating that a Twitter post pertains to a certain theme or topic)

sky & telescope:
Free eBooks
it arises from microcysts in the cornea, and the resulting visual artifact
Most astronomers are sure that no Martians will ever come
previous fadings on six plates between 1902 and 1933
A super-sensitive instrument onboard NASA’s Curiosity rover has found no methane on the Red Planet.
A comet nucleus only a few miles in diameter sometimes produces a tail that stretches tens of millions of kilometers,
Almost all of a comet’s mass is in the nucleus, which can be likened to a “dirty iceball.”
investigation of these iceballs is a comparatively new endeavor.
One possible cause of these breakups is rotational disruption.
Most sungrazers do not survive beyond perihelion
The long-period, sunskirting Comet ISON is headed toward a perihelion
But by late last spring it had morphed into an object
early writers and bloggers simply extrapolated
extend outward north and south for several arcminutes,
driven by DC servo drives with optical encoders for precise slewing
Around December 14th every year, Earth passes through the Geminid meteoroid stream.
hardly more than half the speed of the Perseids, Orionids, and Leonids.
The Moon and the Geminids
G73 and other Andromeda Galaxy globulars are discussed
control, autoguiding, automated focus and more
with a built-in autoguider
today’s deep-sky photographers have switched to electronic autoguiders.
pair of digital imagers that you can attach directly to the mount
for untracked wide-field nightscapes,
or an additional guidescope.
Apply a Gaussian Blur with a radius of about 11.

COMPUTER SHOPPER:
Ultrabook
It’s not much fun if all that content just moulders on
as once malware has installed itself
tried to install some very nasty spyware.
this looked fine onscreen, but every time the document was printed,
iiyama monitors available from the following reseller partners
Has freemium finally put paid to the notion that the best things in life are free?
And you can scale runtime to business requirements.
ransomware, which locks your computer until you pay the bad guys a ransom in return for a key to unlock your system.
reposted and retweeted by thousands of personal accounts.
likes, retweets and +1s
take up a bit more space on the taskbar.
At least 20,000 new viruses, Trojans, worms
The obvious question to ask of the scumbags who create so-called malware is why do they do it?
Unlike with an inkjet printer,
There are loads of inkjets capable of producing highly sharp text,
uncelebrates the anniversary of a Very Bad Thing
Put away your party hats and refuse to pop your poppers,
gamers against following instructions
According to early reports it feels fiddly at first,
Any content originally filmed in standard definition will be upscaled.
be sure to rescan in order to view them.
The tiny all-in-one touchpad proved more fiddly.
Daily backups of the entire infrastructure also ensure maximum security.
has a unibody design that doesn’t open, the One Max has a removable aluminium rear cover.
The resolution works well on such a big screen, making headlines, standfirsts and captions on web pages easy to read when zoomed out.
or 12-megapixels we usually see on modern
Snapdragon 800 chipset with four 2.2GHz cores.
the screen isn’t articulated and there’s no hotshoe, which means there’s no option to add a flashgun or viewfinder.
With their optical viewfinders, hotshoes and plentiful supply of
The P10 comes without any extras except a small loop for threading the drive on your keyring.
The artefacting doesn’t ruin the picture, but it is distracting.
we’d still recommend using lossless file formats
MKV video files that were slickly transcoded in real time.
which is too low for truly smooth gameplay.
or organisation rather than a blog.
WebPlus X7 doesn’t create pages of editable code.
Sailing is dumbed down
The meta-narrative has been rebooted,
Click Script on the toolbar,
Create and manage screenshots the easy way.
Not many integrated graphics chipsets are powerful enough to run modern
shortcuts and multitouch gestures such as two-finger scrolling and pinch-zooming all work perfectly.
They’re not quite as well spaced as chiclet-style keyboards,
ahead of many Core i7-based Ultrabooks.
and uncheck Reverse.
review and agree to its terms of service, unticking the ‘share information’ option if you want before tapping OK.
The heavy focus on microtransactions and the limited number of racetracks is disappointing,
tyres spin out and brakes lock up in the corners.
runs at just 720p and has been oversharpened to compensate, creating a noisy-looking final image.
and other lossy audio codecs,
six individual drivers, including supertweeters, each of which is fed by its own audio channel,
untick ‘Turn on fast startup’,
those using the cursor keys and spacebar,
now understands that calling them a tit or a dickhead is merely a statement of scientific fact.
and hoovered up a million hits in less than a month.

MAXIMUMPC:
intel Roadmap Shows 2tB
but even haters can agree it’s an entertaining ride.
makes no difference to the fanboys and fangirls who will continue
from dial-up modems to broadband.
Best scores are bolded.
maximum of 1.3 gigabits per second
is a buzzkill.
like toolbars and other widgets.
wait while Windows resizes the drive.
TESTED. REVIEWED. VERDICTIZED.
There are two more cables coming out of the heatsink.
free from overdrive-related nasties such as inverse ghosting.
it did get a bit laggy on occasion.
so they would be just fine chillaxing in oil.

NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC MAGAZINE:
six sets of chompers are enough for a lifetime of chewing.
in the Sonoran Desert,
and other blood thinners.
or serotonin norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors
Transparent caseback
modern hummingbirds and swifts.
coordinated by a seahorse-shaped fold of neurons called the hippocampus
through Advancing Innovative Neurotechnologies (BRAIN) Initiative.
behind the scrim of Midwesternness,
as the grandees of Florence decreed.
native Yukoners saw little value in the heavy metal
it’s supercrucial to get out and stake it quick,
It was frozen stiff from the subzero temperatures,

BSD:
Instead of a hodge-podge
Noteworthy is the wildcard match we use in the subsystem
the Internet gremlins have got me at the moment so this how-to is going to be
can’t delete his root until he exclusively unsets the attribute.
just find the checksum for the package/patch
whose status is returned, in a waitable state,
into the hands of the spammers and the criminal underworld,

Samsung Galaxy Tips, Tricks, Apps & Hacks:
Nothing in this bookazine may
Flash ROMs the easy way with Flashify
If you love listening to podcasts,
Greenify can extend your rooted phone’s battery life
If you’re keen to overvolt your device, then download this simple tool.
Shazam app is exactly what you need.
link with multiple desktops,
Missed It! to your homescreen, you’ll be able to see how many missed calls
clever features that make downloading a doddle – including the ability to resume downloads and download scheduling
by ticking the checkbox at the bottom
social-networking logins
see the Chrome homepage that lists
merged into one unified inbox,
become your default tool for emailing every
you’ll be given podcast choices on the main screen.
if you spend some time carefully curating the music you want,
a prolonged YouTube fest.
and the various Hubs which control media content,
from museums to parks and gyms.
if you need a way to optimise your device’s RAM
and choose the Delete option to finalise it.
Localise your
in order to claim any cashback.
Keep an eye on your cashflow with this
Maximise your potential
lets you set the screen timeout to a level
you want in your flashable zip.
ecover deleted files with Undelete
rebooted your device and completed the setup wizard,
continue to keep eBook prices down
for serious research are behind a paywall.
Crowdsourcing information from its 30 million users,
Crowdsource your traffic




All new words have been added, now the wordlist is 319,171 words big, here.


He learns not to learn and reverts to what all men pass by.
Jyrkkä Jätkä
Posted: Tuesday, February 18, 2014 2:52:46 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/21/2009
Posts: 38,304
Neurons: 265,027
Location: Helsinki, Southern Finland Province, Finland
Does your collection know the word netwise?


In the beginning there was nothing, which exploded.
Sanmayce
Posted: Tuesday, February 18, 2014 3:10:07 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 5/29/2012
Posts: 193
Neurons: 975
Location: Sofia, Sofia-Capital, Bulgaria
Yes JJ,
just an excerpt:
...
netter
netterville
nettesheim
nettilling
netting
nettings
nettle
nettlebed
nettlebird
nettled
nettlelike
nettler
nettlerash
nettles
nettlesome
nettleton
nettlewort
nettling
nettly
netty
netwise
network
networkability
networkable
networked
networker
networkers
networking
networks
networkwide
neubecker
neuberger
neubrandenburg
neuburger
neuchatel
neudecker
...


But I have no illusions, the corpus is still relatively poor - it must hit the 450,000 mark in order to cover most terms I need.

He learns not to learn and reverts to what all men pass by.
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Tuesday, February 18, 2014 5:07:39 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/12/2011
Posts: 26,242
Neurons: 139,836
Location: Livingston, Scotland, United Kingdom

There's no adverb - networkably!


Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
leonAzul
Posted: Tuesday, February 18, 2014 6:31:02 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 8/11/2011
Posts: 7,965
Neurons: 25,156
Location: Miami, Florida, United States
Drag0nspeaker wrote:

There's no adverb - networkably!


This brings up an interesting point.

In the process of building this corpus, have you included some preliminary pattern analysis, and identified some rudimentary rules of composition for the English language? The point of this would be to identify radices that are not necessarily determined by length or byte order, such that you are not only building a corpus, but evolving a relational database heuristically.

I await with bated breath the announcement that you have implemented PROMETHEUS™ as a tag-team partner to your plenipotent MASAKARI.

There's a corner of my liver I'm not using you could have to kickstart the project.
Whistle



"Make it go away, Mrs Whatsit," he whispered. "Make it go away. It's evil."
Sanmayce
Posted: Thursday, February 20, 2014 12:09:16 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 5/29/2012
Posts: 193
Neurons: 975
Location: Sofia, Sofia-Capital, Bulgaria
Good point Dragon, to be included in next revision:

- a remote computer having access to a drug-disease database said clinic and remote computers being networkably connected so as to allow data transfer between said computers,
- Coupled with the built-in MySpace support, that is so socially-networkably radical it makes my head hurt like the first time I saw Megafox. Er, Megan. Fox.
- At least that can be passed on to the author, who may not be very networkably social.
- I would add that it's networkably interactive capabilities alone bring an increased value to the equation at sea.

Leon, 'plenipotent', ha-ha, I am flattered.

>In the process of building this corpus, have you included some preliminary pattern analysis, and identified some rudimentary rules of composition for the English language?
I haven't. My approach has nothing to do with linguistics in general, rules and any kind of analyses, it is simply GRABBING all the good stuff my greedy eyes lock onto.

>The point of this would be to identify radices that are not necessarily determined by length or byte order, such that you are not only building a corpus, but evolving a relational database heuristically.
Yes, this could be an alternative, but again, I believe in one-at-a-time updates, that is, each word has to be treated as a pearl in the l-o-o-o-ng string, every single one has to be humanly approved not by a heuristic.
In other words I am not tempted by quick enrichment powered by heuristics and what not, I believe that a single person can DO IT all by himself, sadly I am not this guy, I see myself as a team partner. When comes to PRO approaches I already self-diagnosed myself - too naive, meaning that in the best case scenario if a real professional (versed in Greek, Latin, German, French, Italian, Spanish and ... English) advents to save the day/century of this darkness and I happened to have $1,000,000 pocket money to throw away at my will, here giving a dollar per word, I would hire this legendary hero to end this non-stopping atrocity called 'WE DON'T NEED NO MOST ENGLISH WORDS UNDER ONE ROOF'. Needles to say, yet, this champion would apply the encyclopedic mojo in order to cover/unfold the English Corpus of 1-grams to its FULLEST.

Couldn't resist to check the issues of 'MIT technology review' for last two years.

'Joe Dirt' movie:
restroom
juvie
meemies
busters
dazers
doodads
wussy
crappening


'Out of the Devil’s Cauldron - A Journey From Darkness to Light' by John Ramirez:
Santeria
enflamed
lows
lowlifes
fishnet
jabs
Warlocks
harkened
munchies
matinees
moneylaundering
Santero
Santera
espiritismo


MIT technology review January/February 2012:
(leukemias, lymphomas, and myelomas).
recommend that a mole be biopsied.
whose retweet led to another large burst of responses.
in the middle is a microprinter that
copy and paste your poems onto your computer and connect with any fellow poets offsite.
and “crunked on nip.”
Don’t trust the Cloud to safekeep this stuff,
after a dose of the powerful anesthetic drug propofol, his eyelids begin to droop.
A SCIENCE WRITER AND THE AUTHOR OF SUPERDOVE: HOW THE PIGEON TOOK MANHATTAN
as the Luddites feared mechanical looms 200 years ago,
courtesy of those nanosensors that stop an incipient heart attack
Take telemonitoring, in which today’s mobile apps and tomorrow’s nanosensors would measure blood pressure,
without prior heart disease benefit from a certain statin,
using silicon in the shape of nanowires and other nanostructures

MIT technology review March/April 2012:
It’s a hostile environment: we macheted our way through that jungle of problems.
Automatic voltage regulation (AVR) adjusts the undervoltages and overvoltages without
the APC highly efficient designs reduce power consumption when power is good and extend runtimes when the lights go out.
Key innovation: its benchtop sequencer can sequence a human genome in one day, at a cost of just $1,000 per genome.
the dedicated telephone hotline that used to link the White House and the Kremlin.
required to run 100 miles in less than two days, something he has done more than four times as a devotee of the grueling sport known as ultrarunning.
The product is clunkily named Network Virtualization Platform.
Her roots in Kenya are deep: she is descended from the Nubians conscripted in the Sudan
to venture out for medical checkups and vaccinations;
Mobile phones are lifelines for Kenyans.
Kenya’s loosely knit blogging and technology community
with megabytes of their own biofluctuations: he has an extraordinary ability to fish signal from noise in complex data sets.
but he’s also going public with his biodata, hoping to crowdsource information that will lead to new insights about the elusive links between DNA sequences, biomarkers, and disease.
Doctors are the gatekeepers, and they’re worried about getting disintermediated,
overtesting wastes money, sends patients on tangents, and can lead to false positive results
was very fun—like a sudoku puzzle
After three more rounds of brain teasers,
chasing the same code slingers as
a piece of antique technology, the filmless camera.

MIT technology review May/June 2012:
Solar microgrids.
the echelons of Newton or Leibniz/Leibnitz, as if Turing were the only intelligent person in mathematics during
It also allowed Libyans to tell expats of major needs.
Most social networks provide you with “Click this button and invite your entire address book,” which spams everyone.
when a blogger discovered that its iPhone app copied people’s address books onto Path’s servers without asking permission.
into human oocytes, the immature egg cells
plastic film patterned with tiny microlenses on top of a regular digital sensor
first commercial microgrid was deployed last summer,
an extensive array of metadata to their updates,
took on the sultanists.
journalists fixed this by bridging pairs of mobile Internet dongles to share their increasingly professional content
is raising money for solar installations via online crowdsourced loans.
GPS locators on shipping pallets,
even smaller and ultralow-power devices will proliferate,
calls “nanodata,” or customized fine-grained data
Similarly, the world’s fastest supercomputer, Japan’s 10.5-petaflop Fujitsu K, draws an impressive 12.7 megawatts,
to produce kits
Supercapacitors are far more rugged,

MIT technology review July/August 2012:
The consensus now is that the tsunami protection system at the Fukushima plant was “underdesigned.”
This last group warns of scientists “playing God” and fears that terrorists could exploit the technology for cheap bioweapons.
self-replicating nanobots could devour the planet.
first application could be making sorbents for cleaning up oil spills.

MIT technology review September/October 2012:
today’s gadgets aren’t hackable enough to inspire
to neutralize cyber-crime operations.
highest-emitting countries (in gigatons)
could be cameras that will take refocusable videos.
with different nanoelectric sensors embedded
Instead of sticking fine-tipped glass pipettes into the cells
in the lab of Harvard microrobotics pioneer
Zhao starts by identifying a short, single-stranded piece of DNA called an aptamer that selectively binds
enable them to control Sokoban games simply by speaking commands;
wearing white gowns, face masks, and hairnets so that stray hairs and specks of dust won’t interfere as they perform simple but precise tasks,
a simple graph from the U.S. Energy Information Administration shocked even the most astute energy wonks.

MIT technology review vol. 115/116:
from the charging source to the decharging point?
It shows how a crowdpowered system that is relatively simple can do something that AI has struggled to do for decades,
On a smarter planet, midsize businesses are more intelligent and interconnected than ever before.
researchers built their crowdcontrolled robot,
Smaller superconducting loops called couplers link the qubits so they can interact
he was joining two other roboticists to launch an ambitious educational startup
governments and outside funders are currently more interested in
one of the pens and notepads I keep all around
Well, putzing around can take 30 years.
said the agency should be defunded because its projects are too commercial
gigantic blowups of flowers
so that “Sebaldian” (which mostly means a mournful combination of long sentences and photographs) has become a critics’ adjective.
easy to link to other blogs, use block quotes,
She was funny, acute, and oversharey; she became a microcelebrity and found her manner and coinages aped by other bloggers.
where pitch rises to a kind of pseudoquestion
Nonrequested Distribution
science would confer continual boons and blessings upon us

MIT technology review JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2013:
This microthread electrode, designed to pick up signals from a single neuron
While fracking is frequently blamed for contaminating groundwater,
a drilled well is being hydrofractured.
After a well is fracked,
For the general election, he was named lead targeter for the Great Lakes/Ohio River Valley region,
Obama’s targeters had assigned every
Applying microtargeting models identified which nonregistrants were most likely to be Democrats and which ones Republicans.
persuadable voters were watching those dayparts.
he says the point to keep in mind is that technologywise, “we’re in the top of the first inning.”
tearing down the paywalls around higher education
the proctors use webcams and screen-sharing software
he tries to hire people who are proven multitaskers, like avid videogame players or people who have worked in restaurants.
high levels of sulfates or nitrates.
considered either ultrafiltered or even microfiltered,
The smallest of these, called femtocells
contains microchannels filled with a proprietary oil.

MIT technology review MARCH/APRIL 2013:
Jane Long chairs the California’s Energy Future committee at the California Council on Science and Technology and cochairs the Bipartisan Policy Center’s geoengineering task force.
about 1.5 billion euros ($2 billion)
This pulse oximeter that connects to an iPhone or iPad can precisely detect blood oxygen levels,
This kind of ultra-simple, “glanceable” interaction is where the near future of “wearables” probably lies.

MIT technology review May/June 2013:
It expresses a strong antipaternalist sentiment that no government,
The major nations of the world are in a cyberwar arms race,
That spending will result in more cyberweapons for attack and more cybersurveillance for defense.
they intend to launch as well as defend against cyberattacks,
The technology behind most 3-D microprinters is called two-photon polymerization.
injecting them with nanocapsules containing enzymes
the Swedish group found that Haitians generally
Supergrids: A high-power circuit breaker could finally make DC power grids practical.
The company had made a bunch of missteps
So in his newest book, Earthmasters: The Dawn of the Age of Climate Engineering,
use of sulfur particles or manmade materials
of what would-be geoengineers are proposing.

MIT technology review july/august 2013:
Beyond the drilling rigs,
Bridges, dams, and other civil infrastructure
significant market niches for green bioplastics.
develop applications for nonfuel materials produced in biorefineries.
The tunes you pick will be shared with your friends on Piki, as will any friends' songs you "repick."
Share your friends' songs by "repicking" them.
robots can handle up to four times as many orders as a similar unautomated warehouse
If we nuked them, they could nuke us back.
it meant hunting and killing jihadists,
when British archers used longbows against French knights
suggests radical nonpharmacological approaches to treating pathologies
it reached 2.8 zettabytes in 2012,
sell their users a kind of superhumanism
When someone sends you a message, small, circular avatars appear with a pop.
they need to have chocolate tastings during harvesting and processing,
With cacao, the way a bean is fermented plays as big a role in flavor as terroir,
there is an endgame for those who feel the need to beat a video game rather than simply enjoy one.

MIT technology review SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2013:
a gathering of so-called transhumanists who hope to download their minds into android bodies.
is an unlikely technology megastar.
out of the cyberespionage business
no-nonsense bicycle beloved by Netherlanders.
batteries are sourced from major electronics companies.
philanthropic microloans,
featuring a couple of plastic bins and some tubing
best friend, superfan, and inspiration.
water-assisted subcritical debonding
In a 2012 shakeup, Lazaridis stepped down as BlackBerry's co-CEO.
straight people, gays and lesbians
Hanging Out, Messing Around and Geeking Out
in a thick goo of hydrogel

MIT technology review NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2013:
an automated supercar cruising along
Harmoniously combining the soul-stirring performance typical from any Porsche engine with the smart efficiency
Web pages sometimes froze, and several videos were glitchy.
this is not the Internet of “virtual communities” and “netizens.”
The Folly of Technological Solutionism.
that we don't overhype how well it works.
the Boston Marathon bombings,
that is a time capsule from the Web's earlier, clunkier days, far removed from the easy-to-use social and commercial sites that dominate today.
site's content remained with the community dubbed Wikipedians, who over the next few years compiled an encyclopedia larger than any before.
People pick up the hashtags and @ signs straight away.
just a regular Wikipedian but still influential
to respond to questions from pulmonologists and other experts
But the Sloan-Kettering pushback also shows how a single influential committee
digital technology will lead to "the hyperpersonalization of health care"
likes the tale of the humble sash because it shows how dramatic improvements can be found in the unsexy logistics
It does the job of a $5,000 instrument called an autorefractor.
air conditioning and chillers for hot climates.
Instead, he wants documents to be directly embedded into one another "transcluded," in his language - so that the original source of an idea is always there.
Many showrunners and executives I know not only pirate stuff all the time but also privately endorse

Also some new words from 'Wiktionary_headwords_2012.txt.html':
aandblom
abackward
abacost
aband
abapically
abastard
abatised
abay
abditory
abductively
abearing
aberr
abime
abled
ablute
aboding
abominationly
abomine
abortee
abortorium
aboulic
abrim
abrin
abrood
abscisic
absonous
absterse
abstractify
abstractionistic

...

Caramba, SOED is so poor compared to 'Wiktionary', e.g. the last two not being 'recognized' by SOED&HERITAGE is a mere misery.
Also I wonder why Wiktionarians didn't take the exhaustive way in listing them e.g. where are the beautiful:
abstractifies
abstractifying
abstractified


Still wondering when a real English language visionary will step in and open the eyes of all "linguists" for need for unabridged word directory, how nice it would be if there were such book printed and available everywhere, as telephone books were.
I wish I knew a man like Samuel 'Dictionary' Johnson, sadly only pimps/pimpesses/pimpoids/pimpoidesses in my sight.

Recently I watched the Mike Tyson's life walkthrough spectacle, BRAVO, where he admitted how he misspelled common words as 'birthday' when trying to text some congratulations to his kids via cell phone, with his kids' reaction being "How this can be!" - if only a word directory was available in Brownsville, such educational atrocities could have been avoided.
Mike Tyson: Undisputed Truth (HBO Sports)

You know, I really don't know much about my mother.
I remember her drinking a lot and always angry and fighting.
I knew she had dreams of becoming a schoolteacher.
But then she met my father...
well, the man I was told was my father.
The fast-talking, cool-dressing pimp who I always credited with changing the path of my mother's life.
And before long, she was caught up in the street life.
But she paid the heavy toll because at heart she really wasn't that girl at all.
So she drank to cover up the pain.

There was a boy
A very strange, chatty/enchanted boy
They say he wandered very far
Very far, over land and sea
A little shy and sad of eye
But very wise was he
And then one day, a magic day
He passed my way
While we spoke of many things
Fools and Kings
This he said to me:
"The greatest thing you'll ever learn
Is just to love and be loved in return".


/Nat King Cole - 'Nature Boy'/

'Nature Boy' was written by Eden Ahbez, one of the strangest songwriters of the pre-Hippie era. He was a beatnik poet, a proto-Hippie with long hair , a full beard, and routinely dressed in long, white, flowing garments. He lived in Griffith Park in Los Angeles, ate fruit, vegetables and nuts. Ahbez was born in Brooklyn in 1908 and died, March 4, 1995.

The trigram 'sad_of_eye' caught me clueless of its existence so I threw a look at '_of_eye' suffixed phrases:

[&_of_eye&] 0,000,054 bright_of_eye /4andabove_Gamera17LBL.3.txt.sorted/
[&_of_eye&] 0,000,051 dark_of_eye /4andabove_Gamera17LBL.3.txt.sorted/
[&_of_eye&] 0,000,042 clear_of_eye /4andabove_Gamera17LBL.3.txt.sorted/
[&_of_eye&] 0,000,022 wild_of_eye /4andabove_Gamera17LBL.3.txt.sorted/
[&_of_eye&] 0,000,019 sharp_of_eye /4andabove_Gamera17LBL.3.txt.sorted/
[&_of_eye&] 0,000,015 steady_of_eye /4andabove_Gamera17LBL.3.txt.sorted/
[&_of_eye&] 0,000,015 cold_of_eye /4andabove_Gamera17LBL.3.txt.sorted/
[&_of_eye&] 0,000,014 witch_of_eye /4andabove_Gamera17LBL.3.txt.sorted/
[&_of_eye&] 0,000,014 dull_of_eye /4andabove_Gamera17LBL.3.txt.sorted/
[&_of_eye&] 0,000,013 merry_of_eye /4andabove_Gamera17LBL.3.txt.sorted/
[&_of_eye&] 0,000,013 alert_of_eye /4andabove_Gamera17LBL.3.txt.sorted/
[&_of_eye&] 0,000,011 haggard_of_eye /4andabove_Gamera17LBL.3.txt.sorted/
[&_of_eye&] 0,000,011 glad_of_eye /4andabove_Gamera17LBL.3.txt.sorted/
[&_of_eye&] 0,000,010 shine_of_eye /4andabove_Gamera17LBL.3.txt.sorted/
[&_of_eye&] 0,000,010 afraid_of_eye /4andabove_Gamera17LBL.3.txt.sorted/
[&_of_eye&] 0,000,008 fire_of_eye /4andabove_Gamera17LBL.3.txt.sorted/
[&_of_eye&] 0,000,007 innocent_of_eye /4andabove_Gamera17LBL.3.txt.sorted/
[&_of_eye&] 0,000,007 calm_of_eye /4andabove_Gamera17LBL.3.txt.sorted/
[&_of_eye&] 0,000,006 shrewd_of_eye /4andabove_Gamera17LBL.3.txt.sorted/
[&_of_eye&] 0,000,006 joyful_of_eye /4andabove_Gamera17LBL.3.txt.sorted/
[&_of_eye&] 0,000,005 sparkling_of_eye /4andabove_Gamera17LBL.3.txt.sorted/
[&_of_eye&] 0,000,005 simple_of_eye /4andabove_Gamera17LBL.3.txt.sorted/
[&_of_eye&] 0,000,005 sad_of_eye /4andabove_Gamera17LBL.3.txt.sorted/

Nice, I wasn't aware of these, only of 'with_sadful_eyes'.

He learns not to learn and reverts to what all men pass by.
Sanmayce
Posted: Saturday, February 22, 2014 4:15:02 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 5/29/2012
Posts: 193
Neurons: 975
Location: Sofia, Sofia-Capital, Bulgaria
Leon's nifty word 'plenipotent' got me thinking, vanity is good as far as appreciativeness lasts, I enjoyed for a moment the WORDSHIP (wo-ow, a wow coinage of mine) however the right adjective is:

prepotent
adj.
1. Greater in power, influence, or force than another or others; predominant.
2. Genetics Of, having, or exhibiting prepotency.
[Middle English, from Latin praepotēns, praepotent- present participle of praeposse, to be more powerful : prae-, pre- + posse, to be able or powerful; see poti- in Indo-European roots.]

/HERITAGE/

I felt the urge to complement existing Masakariids (words of MASAKARI family, or more poetically after falling stars, if making an even deeper poetical plunge into cosmos: MASAKARI is the star whereas all its words come as shootingstars) with 'plenus' prefixed words and all 'potent' postfixed words I can find.

Leonid
n. pl. Leonids or Leonides
One of the falling stars of the meteor shower recurring annually in mid-November.

/HERITAGE/

Perseid
n. pl. Perseids or Perseides
One of a shower of meteors that appears to originate in the vicinity of the constellation Perseus during the second week of August.
[From Latin Perseus, the constellation Perseus ; see Perseus, or from Greek Persēides, pl. of Persēis, offspring of Perseus (from Perseus, Perseus).]

/HERITAGE/

Nereid
n.
1. Greek Mythology Any of the sea nymphs, the 50 daughters of Nereus.
2. The satellite of Neptune that is eighth in distance from the planet.
[Latin Nērēïs, Nērēïd-, from Greek, from Nēreus, Nereus.]

/HERITAGE/

saturniid
n.
Any of various often large and colorful moths of the family Saturniidae, such as the emperor moth.
adj.
Of or belonging to the Saturniidae.
[From New Latin Sāturniidae, family name, from Sāturnia, type genus, from Latin, daughter of Saturn, from feminine of Sāturnius, Saturnian, from Sāturnus, Saturn ; see Saturn.]

/HERITAGE/

Hesitating for a minute with which one should I go, my choice is: 'Masakariids' instead of 'Masakarids'.
The cause for my hesitation was the wrong (I think 'Geminiids' is the correct one) usage of 'Geminids' in "sky & telescope" magazine from DECEMBER 2013, but SOED saved the situation:



acridid, noun & adjective.
M20.
[mod. Latin Acrididae (see below), from Greek akrid-, akris locust: see -ID3.]
Entomology.
A. noun. A grasshopper or locust of the family Acrididae, characterized by the possession of relatively short antennae. M20.
B. adjective. Of, pertaining to, or designating this family. M20.
* acridian noun & adjective = ACRIDID L19.
* acridiid noun & adjective = ACRIDID E20.


Thus, next 2 precious to me new words are to be added:
Masakariid
Masakariids


Only after inclusion, 'Masakariid' will become a 'masakariid'. And what a pleasant ring comes from: 'A corpus of unigrams 1,000,000+ masakariids worth.'
Also, instead of the boring 'unfamiliar to MASAKARI' I will use the plain 'nonmasakariid'.

Okay, back to 'plenus' and 'potent':

plenus
plenarius
PLENAR
PLENARY
plenierete
plenarily
plenilunium ! pleniluniums ! Wonderful! How else to say "Many a fullmoon" or "Many fullmoons"
Note: In Bulgarian we have both 'пълна луна'/'пълнолуние' i.e. 'full moon'/'fullmoon'.
plenilunal
plenilunar
plenilunary
plenipotent ! plenipotently !
plenipotence
plenipotency
plenipotential
plenipotentiarius
plenipotentiary
plenipotentiaries
plenish
plenishing
PLENUM ! PLENUMS !
plenist ! plenists !
plenipo ! plenipoes !
plenilune
plene
plenarty
plenarium ! plenariums !
plenitude ! plenitudes !
plenitudinous
plenteous
plenteously
plenteousness
plentiful
plentifully
plentifulness
plentify ! plentifies/plentified/plentifying !
plentitude !plentitudes!
plenty ! plenties !

Above ones still not exhausted as it should.

After 1-gram leprechauning (extracting the words from) the latest Wiktionary (enwiktionary-20140206-pages-articles.xml 3,493,442,310 bytes long) I wanted to see its:
'plenip*' words:
...
0,000,002 plenipo
0,000,002 plenipoten ???
0,000,003 plenipotence
0,000,006 plenipotenci ???
0,000,002 plenipotenciaria
0,000,007 plenipotenciario
0,000,001 plenipotency
0,000,002 plenipotens ???
0,000,001 plenipotense
0,000,006 plenipotent
0,000,001 plenipotentia
0,000,001 plenipotentiaire
0,000,002 plenipotential
0,000,001 plenipotentiari
0,000,008 plenipotentiaries
0,000,001 plenipotentiario
0,000,003 plenipotentiaris
0,000,001 plenipotentiarius
0,000,060 plenipotentiary
0,000,001 plenipotenziar
0,000,001 plenipotenziari
0,000,002 plenipotenziaria
0,000,002 plenipotenziarie
0,000,007 plenipotenziario
...
'plent*' words:
...
0,000,022 plent
0,000,001 plentami
0,000,002 plentas
0,000,003 plente
0,000,001 plenteif
0,000,002 plenteis
0,000,002 plenteive
0,000,002 plenteives
0,000,051 plenteous
0,000,017 plenteously
0,000,010 plenteousness
0,000,001 plentet
0,000,001 plenteth
0,000,002 plentevous
0,000,001 plentez
0,000,003 plenti
0,000,003 plentie
0,000,008 plenties
0,000,002 plentif
0,000,001 plentifil ???
0,000,270 plentiful
0,000,004 plentifull ???
0,000,006 plentifuller
0,000,001 plentifullest
0,000,061 plentifully
0,000,013 plentifulness
0,000,005 plentily
0,000,014 plentitude
0,000,004 plentitudes
0,000,001 plentiveus
0,000,002 plently ???
0,000,001 plentor
0,000,001 plentrafo
0,000,004 plentur
0,000,002 plentureus
0,001,269 plenty
0,000,001 plentya
0,000,028 plentyn
0,000,001 plentynaidd
0,000,003 plentyoffish
0,000,002 plentywood
...

Double-disappointing, the quality&quantity are inferior.
Finally, wanted to see whether my precious new coinage 'WORDSHIP' is among its 10,587,653 distinct words, no, yes, Wiktionarians lack the wordship of MASAKARI, as for the spirit within - FORGET.

Let's unfold next SOED ones with 'potence'/'potency'/'potential'/'potentiary'/'potentiaries':

armipotent ! armipotently/ armipotence/ armipotency/ armipotential/ armipotentiary/ armipotentiaries ! armipotentness
bellipotent ! bellipotently/ bellipotence/ bellipotency/ bellipotential/ bellipotentiary/ bellipotentiaries ! bellipotentness
cunctipotent ! cunctipotently/ cunctipotence/ cunctipotency/ cunctipotential/ cunctipotentiary/ cunctipotentiaries ! cunctipotentness
equipotent ! equipotently/ equipotence/ equipotency/ equipotential/ equipotentiary/ equipotentiaries ! equipotentness
idempotent ! idempotently/ idempotence/ idempotency/ idempotential/ idempotentiary/ idempotentiaries ! idempotentness
ignipotent ! ignipotently/ ignipotence/ ignipotency/ ignipotential/ ignipotentiary/ ignipotentiaries ! ignipotentness
impotent ! impotently/ impotence/ impotency/ impotential/ impotentiary/ impotentiaries ! impotentness
magnipotent ! magnipotently/ magnipotence/ magnipotency/ magnipotential/ magnipotentiary/ magnipotentiaries ! magnipotentness
multipotent ! multipotently/ multipotence/ multipotency/ multipotential/ multipotentiary/ multipotentiaries ! multipotentness
nilpotent ! nilpotently/ nilpotence/ nilpotency/ nilpotential/ nilpotentiary/ nilpotentiaries ! nilpotentness
omnipotent ! omnipotently/ omnipotence/ omnipotency/ omnipotential/ omnipotentiary/ omnipotentiaries ! omnipotentness
plenipotent ! plenipotently/ plenipotence/ plenipotency/ plenipotential/ plenipotentiary/ plenipotentiaries ! plenipotentness
pluripotent ! pluripotently/ pluripotence/ pluripotency/ pluripotential/ pluripotentiary/ pluripotentiaries ! pluripotentness
potent ! potently/ potence/ potency/ potential/ potentiary/ potentiaries ! potentness
prepotent ! prepotently/ prepotence/ prepotency/ prepotential/ prepotentiary/ prepotentiaries ! prepotentness
subpotent ! subpotently/ subpotence/ subpotency/ subpotential/ subpotentiary/ subpotentiaries ! subpotentness
totipotent ! totipotently/ totipotence/ totipotency/ totipotential/ totipotentiary/ totipotentiaries ! totipotentness
unipotent ! unipotently/ unipotence/ unipotency/ unipotential/ unipotentiary/ unipotentiaries ! unipotentness
ventripotent ! ventripotently/ ventripotence/ ventripotency/ ventripotential/ ventripotentiary/ ventripotentiaries ! ventripotentness
viripotent ! viripotently/ viripotence/ viripotency/ viripotential/ viripotentiary/ viripotentiaries ! viripotentness

I like a lot 'bellipotentiaries', it tops (at least comes shotgun with) the well-established 'warhawks', I think.
belligerent
adj.
1. Inclined or eager to fight; hostile or aggressive.
2. Of, pertaining to, or engaged in warfare.
n.
One that is hostile or aggressive, especially one that is engaged in war.
[Latin belligerāns, belligerant- present participle of belligerāre, to wage war, from belliger, warlike : bellum, war + gerere, to make.]

/HERITAGE/
As for 'impotentiaries', guess what, a playful synonym for 'good-for-nothing-s'.

plenipotentiary, adjective & noun.
...
B. noun. A person invested with plenipotentiary power or authority, esp. with regard to a particular transaction, as the conclusion of a treaty. M17.
L. Oliphant: Mr Wade ... delivered the ultimata to the French and English plenipotentiaries.

/SOED/

Oh, 'ventripotent' is a good mild substitute for greedy, SOED says:
literary. Now rare. E17.

Also, the existence of four adjectives prompts for further unfolding(s):
VENTRILOQUE, adjective
ventriloquous, adjective
VENTRILOQUISTIC, adjective
VENTRILOQUIAL, adjective

On second thought, the more correct 'prepotent/magnipotent' are trumped by the 'plenipotent', I guess vanity has the last word, he-he.

He learns not to learn and reverts to what all men pass by.
Sanmayce
Posted: Tuesday, March 18, 2014 3:52:15 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 5/29/2012
Posts: 193
Neurons: 975
Location: Sofia, Sofia-Capital, Bulgaria
For a long time I wanted to juxtapose raw words of SOED & EnWiktionary.

First, I had to filter a bit the incoming SOED's 123MB html data.
Three things were filtered:
- Now words like this
psychiatri&sm;zation noun L20. psychiatri_sm_zation noun L20.
will be restored to their full status.
- Also
* psychobio"graphic,
* psychobio"graphical adjectives L20.
* psychobio"graphically adverb L20.

- The data between square brackets will be omitted, there is 'NOISE', like Latin and other languages root forms.

Second, I extracted only the headdata (up to the '#' i.e. without definitions) from the incoming ENWIKT's 63MB TSV data.

Thus, SOED/EnWiktionary featured respectively 205,873/421,106 distinct words.

The interesting thing is to produce the wordlist featuring words both from SOED&EnWiktionary but not from current MASAKARI (319,675 words).
This will be a not-bad-at-all 'shortlist'.

The clash of SOED & EnWiktionary resulted in 143,790 collisions (common distinct words).
The total (after combining) number of distinct words is: 483,189.

205,873-143,790=62,083
62,083+421,106=483,189

Those 143,790 common words when combined with MASAKARI's became 341,673 common distinct words.
Now, 121,792 are both in the two camps (SOED&EnWiktionary) and (MASAKARI) i.e. the new words to MASAKARI are 21,998.

The script doing all this mumbo-jumbo is this:

dir _SOED_.TXT/b>s.lst
dir enwikt-defs-20140206-en.tsv_up-to-hashtag_689367-lines.txt/b>e.lst
Leprechaun_x-leton_32bit_Intel_01_4p.exe s.lst s.wrd 1234567 y
Leprechaun_x-leton_32bit_Intel_01_4p.exe e.lst e.wrd 1234567 y
dir s.wrd/b>2.lst
dir e.wrd/b>>2.lst
Leprechaun_x-leton_32bit_Intel_01_4p.exe 2.lst 2.wrd 1234567 Y
Kazahana "002" 2.wrd 7169
if exist SOED_and_Enwiktionary.txt del SOED_and_Enwiktionary.txt
ren Kazahana.txt SOED_and_Enwiktionary.txt
rem Here we want words that are in SOED_and_Enwiktionary.txt but not in Masakari...
dir MASAKARI_General-Purpose_Grade_English_Wordlist_319675.wrd/b>m.lst
dir SOED_and_Enwiktionary.txt/b>>m.lst
Leprechaun_x-leton_32bit_Intel_01_4p.exe m.lst 3.wrd 1234567 Y
Kazahana "002" 3.wrd 7169
if exist SOED_and_Enwiktionary_and_MASAKARI.txt del SOED_and_Enwiktionary_and_MASAKARI.txt
ren Kazahana.txt SOED_and_Enwiktionary_and_MASAKARI.txt
dir SOED_and_Enwiktionary_and_MASAKARI.txt/b>2vs1.lst
dir SOED_and_Enwiktionary.txt/b>>2vs1.lst
Leprechaun_x-leton_32bit_Intel_01_4p.exe 2vs1.lst 2vs1.wrd 1234567 Y
Kazahana "001" 2vs1.wrd 7169
if exist In_SOED_and_Enwiktionary_but_not_in_MASAKARI.txt del In_SOED_and_Enwiktionary_but_not_in_MASAKARI.txt
ren Kazahana.txt In_SOED_and_Enwiktionary_but_not_in_MASAKARI.txt
dir In_SOED_and_Enwiktionary_but_not_in_MASAKARI.txt/b>FINAL.LST
Leprechaun_x-leton_32bit_Intel_01_4p.exe FINAL.LST FINAL.WRD 1234567 y
sort FINAL.WRD /O In_SOED_and_Enwiktionary_but_not_in_MASAKARI.wrd


Some of the new words:
abastardise
aberrationally
aberred
abhomination
abrasional
absalom
abuseth
abyssian
accidens !!!
acean
aceous
acephaly
achirality
aciculae
acidise
acroparaesthesia
se !!!
zeolites
zeugmatographic
zingily
zippily
zips
zircaloy
zodiack
zylonite

per accidens, adverbial phr.
E16.
[mod. Latin, formed as PER + Latin accidens, accident-: see ACCIDENT.]
1. By virtue of some non-essential circumstance; contingently, indirectly. Opp. PER SE. E16.
2. Logic. By which the quantity of the proposition is changed from universal to particular in a conversion. Opp. SIMPLY 2c. L16.

/SOED/

per se, adverbial phr.
L16.
[Latin.]
By or in itself; intrinsically, essentially. Opp. PER ACCIDENS 1.
A per se: see A, A 1.
"Brain: Whether the determinant factor is actually the size of the external load per se."
Cf. AMPERSAND.

/SOED/

I was right in my estimation, in order to provide 'bare necessities' MASAKARI should hit the 450,000~480,000 mark.

Currently not having e.g.
bravA
bravissimA

is unacceptable, at least
bravo
bravissimo

are there.

So much work/fun ahead, eh.

Here I say thanks to Wiktionarians, their 'enwikt-defs-20140206-en.tsv.txt' is the richest descriptive list of words known to me.

Another four new words to be added:

It crossed over, becoming top 40 radio’s biggest vocalless hit since Robert Miles’ “Children” in 1996.
Country’s bad girl is yearning for simpler times, and this midtempo rocker is a trip back to her early recordings: ...
At the core are four bandmates eager to figure out how to turn their ups and downs into something lasting.
holding out the ball for the Toronto Raptors

/Billboard Magazine - 1 March 2014/

Also while browsing some Rudyard Kipling's stories I found missing these bold words:

"Charlie," I asked, "when the rowers on the gallies mutinied how did they kill their overseers?"
And to the King of the Saxons ...
It is that we may not remember our first wooings.
- Fuzzy-wuzzy
... and she made funny little gestures with her roseleaf hands
It makes me uncomfy.
And very incitedly he drew them all without stopping,
and after Hieroglyphics and Demotics, and Nilotics, and Cryptics, and Cufics, and Runics, and Dorics, and Ionics, and all sorts of other ...
And the Camel humphed himself, humph and all, and went away ...
And a snarly-yarly voice.
He was a Primitive, and he lived cavily in a Cave, ...
... from his mendy-bag and began to mend his spear.
We climb out of bed with a frouzly head ...
... with their Hetmans and Dolmans, all Neguses, Woons, and Akhoonds of the organisation, in addition to the Warlocks, Angekoks, ...
full of trees and bushes and stripy, speckly, patchy-blatchy shadows, and there they hid: and after another long time, what with standing half in the shade and half out of it, and what with the slippery-slidy shadows of the trees falling on them,
... speckly-spickly shadows of the forest,
... speckled and sprottled and spottled, dotted and splashed and slashed and hatched and cross-hatched with shadows.
I drawded them to show him the way through the swamp;
'Let us melt into the landscape--just us two by our lones.'
of fat, cold, pobby corpses,
But he will insist upon treating his ghosts--he has published half a workshopful of them--with levity.
... the turbid Amazon, eating green lettuces and things.
... and it makes me more mixy than before.
... Slow-and-Solid actually managed to curl up a tiddy wee bit.
... with their scales lying lippety-lappety one over the other, like pine-cone scales,
... the shifting sand of the Ganges' bed.
Riveters by the hundred swarmed about the lattice ...
...and it covered storm, sudden freshets,
... by two generations of sea-rovers all unaffected ...
In London I did poojah to the big temple by the river ...
... by the tool-issue sheds for bars and mattocks;
... by no more than eddies and spoutings,
... a long-drawn shriek of wire straining across gunnels.
And I, who am Ganesh of Good Luck, I bless my peoples.
... they will pay fewer dues to your fat Brahmins.
... the hunters of rats and noosers of dogs whisper ...
... Afrits and Djinns came Out of the earth to do whatever he told them.
So he went on between the lilies and the loquats and the roses and the cannas and the heavy-scented ginger-plants ...
He leaned back all weak and hiccoughy, and shook his finger at the Butterfly and said, 'O great wizard, ...
HEAR and attend and listen; for this befell and behappened and became and was, O my Best Beloved, when the Tame animals were wild.
... and wild cherries, and wild grenadillas.
... and spanked the Elephant's Child with his scalesome, flailsome tail.
... close to the Crocodile's musky, tusky mouth, ...
... doing he schlooped up a schloop of mud from the banks of the great grey-green, greasy Limpopo, and slapped it on his head, where it made a cool schloopy-sloshy mud-cap ...
... mad priest who is going in his estimation to sell petty gauds and insignificant trinkets ...
That was in a most mountaineous country, ...
... my unlover-like tardiness;
The syces, impassive as Orientals always are, had come up with the recaptured horses;
Very few natives care to irritate chamars for this reason.
Lone Sahib entered the room gingerly, and there, on the pillow of his bed, sprawled and whimpered a wee white kitten; not a jumpsome, frisky little beast, but a slug-like crawler with its eyes barely opened and its paws lacking strength or direction--a kitten that ought to have been in a basket with its mamma.
... from his seat on the sandflat and shouted, ...
... but I am not a budmash. I am a man!
... who had now gathered all his shirt round his neck, stringwise, and the yell subsided into a sob.
... to go shopping in the bazars on Wednesday,
They came up to the bowlders on which ...

/Rudyard Kipling/

Caramba, 'Rudyard' was missing too.

...
The runaround will wear you out
You break it off, I'll break you down
...
I wrote the book on it, don't test me now
I wrote the book on it

Going beyond 1,000,000 mark is what I want.
Here I recall one video-interview with Beth Ditto, a songstress sweetheart, wherein she animatedly said 'How amazing it is gonna be!'

I love loud clear voices like hers, one of her superb live performances:
Beth Ditto & The Gossip - Heavy Cross / LIVE on german TV Show

She reminds me of the states when reaching/touching precious things animates you, a magical driving force called...

He learns not to learn and reverts to what all men pass by.
leonAzul
Posted: Wednesday, March 19, 2014 2:21:44 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 8/11/2011
Posts: 7,965
Neurons: 25,156
Location: Miami, Florida, United States
Sanmayce wrote:

Here I recall one video-interview with Beth Ditto, a songstress sweetheart, wherein she animatedly said 'How amazing it is gonna be!'

I love loud clear voices like hers, one of her superb live performances:
Beth Ditto & The Gossip - Heavy Cross / LIVE on german TV Show

She reminds me of the states when reaching/touching precious things animates you, a magical driving force called...


…Was hast du vor?
Angel


"Make it go away, Mrs Whatsit," he whispered. "Make it go away. It's evil."
Jyrkkä Jätkä
Posted: Wednesday, March 19, 2014 2:57:01 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/21/2009
Posts: 38,304
Neurons: 265,027
Location: Helsinki, Southern Finland Province, Finland
The Freedelfinide Commissiom of Inquiry has taken your rendition under consideration.


In the beginning there was nothing, which exploded.
Sanmayce
Posted: Saturday, March 22, 2014 1:32:33 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 5/29/2012
Posts: 193
Neurons: 975
Location: Sofia, Sofia-Capital, Bulgaria
Grrr, my German vocabulary is worse than Beth's one.
Leon, nothing in particular, just playing around with some overlooked transformations.
I'm as Captain Apache, starring Lee Van Cleef, in which he was asked by the main protagonist what was he searching for when our guy was caught in rummaging the cabinets of the former, the answer was 'Nothing in particular, it is amazing how many things pop-up when one just searches.' Golden classic it is.



When one says 'a' it is good to say 'b' afterwards, here 'b' is my favorite dictionary.

Round #2 is juxtaposition of raw words of HERITAGE & EnWiktionary.

First, I had to filter a bit the incoming HERITAGE's 27MB textual data.
Two things were filtered:
- The stresses were removed in order to obtain the whole words:
* no?solog?ical (-se-låj?Ö-kel) or no?solog?ic (-Ök) adjective
* no?solog?ically adverb
* nosol?ogist noun

- The data between square/round brackets will be omitted, there is etymological/transcriptional 'NOISE'.

After grabbing, HERITAGE/EnWiktionary featured respectively 136,587/421,106 distinct words.

The interesting thing is to produce the wordlist featuring words both from HERITAGE&EnWiktionary but not from current MASAKARI (319,675 words).
This will be a not-bad-at-all 'shortlist'.

The clash of HERITAGE & EnWiktionary resulted in 116,155 collisions (common distinct words).
The total (after combining) number of distinct words is: 441,538.

136,587-116,155=20,432
20,432+421,106=441,538

Those 116,155 common words when combined with MASAKARI's became 329,803 common distinct words.
Now, 106,027 are both in the two camps (HERITAGE&EnWiktionary) and (MASAKARI) i.e. the new words to MASAKARI are 10,128.

Some of the new words:
aahed
aahing
abend
abrash
abronia
abruzzi
absalom
absaroke
absarokes
absquatulates
absurdisms
acadians
accolading
aciculae
adhesiotomies
adiantum
adrenalizes
adrenalizing
aeneid
aerobicizes
aerobicizing
aetolia
aetolian
aminoglycan
amniocenteses
amnioscopies
anadiploses
anadyr
anagoges
anencephalies
aphaereses
apractic
apraxic
aromatherapies
xylographing
yams
yatagan
yeaned
yeaning
yeans
yeats
yoghourt
zannesque
zappier
zappiest
zested
zesting
zhukov !!!
zips
zircaloy
zola
zonetime
zonks
zoochlorellas
zoonoses
zoophobe
zooplasties
zoos
zygoses
zygous
zymoses


Zhukov, Georgi Konstantinovich 1896-1974.
Soviet army officer. As chief of staff during World War II, he directed the counteroffensive at Stalingrad, relieved Leningrad (1942-1943), and captured Berlin (April 1945).

/HERITAGE/

Hm, I am confused here, the name of the Russian hero is 'Georgii' or 'Georgiy', there are many (I wanted to exhaust them all one day) variations both male/female in Greek/Bulgarian/Georgian/Russian and other languages. Please share yours here with us.
As in:
Volzhskiy
A city of southwest Russia on the Volga River, a manufacturing suburb of Volgograd. Population: 281,947.

/HERITAGE/

Ha, two more missing words 'Georgium' and 'Sidus':
Georgium Sidus, noun phr.
L18.
[mod. Latin, lit. 'planet of George'.]
Hist. The name given to the planet Uranus by its discoverer, William Herschel, in honour of King George III of Great Britain.

/SOED/

There was one modiste, half Bulgarian half German named 'Georgette', she was very passionate about clothings and style.
My grandgrandmother was called 'Gyorgena', the 'Georgena' variant exists also.

To get it started:
Georgos/Giorgos/Georgios/Georgius/Georg/Georgi/Georgii/Georgiy/George/Georges/Georgie/Geordie//Georgette/Gyorgena/Georgena/Georgia/Georgina/Georgiana/Giorgi/Gio/Gia/Gogi/Goga/Jorge/Giorgio...

And to get common words from the three (HERITAGE&SOED&EnWiktionary) and then to dump the nonmasakariids (unfamiliar to Masakari ones) is of some worth (strengthening the shortlist from Round #1).

The script doing all this mumbo-jumbo is this:

dir _SOED_.TXT/b>s.lst
dir _HERITA_.TXT/b>h.lst
dir enwikt-defs-20140206-en.tsv_up-to-hashtag_689367-lines.txt/b>e.lst
Leprechaun_x-leton_32bit_Intel_01_4p.exe s.lst s.wrd 1234567 y
Leprechaun_x-leton_32bit_Intel_01_4p.exe h.lst h.wrd 1234567 y
Leprechaun_x-leton_32bit_Intel_01_4p.exe e.lst e.wrd 1234567 y
dir s.wrd/b>3.lst
dir h.wrd/b>>3.lst
dir e.wrd/b>>3.lst
Leprechaun_x-leton_32bit_Intel_01_4p.exe 3.lst 3.wrd 1234567 Y
Kazahana "003" 3.wrd 7169
if exist SOED_and_HERITAGE_and_Enwiktionary.txt del SOED_and_HERITAGE_and_Enwiktionary.txt
ren Kazahana.txt SOED_and_HERITAGE_and_Enwiktionary.txt
rem Here we want words that are in SOED_and_HERITAGE_and_Enwiktionary.txt but not in Masakari...
dir MASAKARI_General-Purpose_Grade_English_Wordlist_319675.wrd/b>m.lst
dir SOED_and_HERITAGE_and_Enwiktionary.txt/b>>m.lst
Leprechaun_x-leton_32bit_Intel_01_4p.exe m.lst 3.wrd 1234567 Y
Kazahana "002" 3.wrd 7169
if exist SOED_and_HERITAGE_and_Enwiktionary_and_MASAKARI.txt del SOED_and_HERITAGE_and_Enwiktionary_and_MASAKARI.txt
ren Kazahana.txt SOED_and_HERITAGE_and_Enwiktionary_and_MASAKARI.txt
dir SOED_and_HERITAGE_and_Enwiktionary_and_MASAKARI.txt/b>2vs1.lst
dir SOED_and_HERITAGE_and_Enwiktionary.txt/b>>2vs1.lst
Leprechaun_x-leton_32bit_Intel_01_4p.exe 2vs1.lst 2vs1.wrd 1234567 Y
Kazahana "001" 2vs1.wrd 7169
if exist In_SOED_and_HERITAGE_and_Enwiktionary_but_not_in_MASAKARI.txt del In_SOED_and_HERITAGE_and_Enwiktionary_but_not_in_MASAKARI.txt
ren Kazahana.txt In_SOED_and_HERITAGE_and_Enwiktionary_but_not_in_MASAKARI.txt
dir In_SOED_and_HERITAGE_and_Enwiktionary_but_not_in_MASAKARI.txt/b>FINAL.LST
Leprechaun_x-leton_32bit_Intel_01_4p.exe FINAL.LST FINAL.WRD 1234567 y
sort FINAL.WRD /O In_SOED_and_HERITAGE_and_Enwiktionary_but_not_in_MASAKARI.wrd


The 'In_SOED_and_HERITAGE_and_Enwiktionary_but_not_in_MASAKARI.wrd' file is 5,671 words long.

I wanted all words 4 and above letters long (thus discarding all 1/2/3 letters long ones) which was produced by this line:

Kazahana.exe "$$$$." In_SOED_and_HERITAGE_and_Enwiktionary_but_not_in_MASAKARI.wrd 7119


Finally, the candidate shortlist is 4,400 words long:

aaas, abab, abbassid, abbrev, abdul, abel, abenaki, abib, abnaki, abram, abronia, absalom, acad, acantho, accus, acean, aceous, aceto, achaea, aciculae, aclu, acro, acte, acter, acth, actino, adair, adams, adar, addams, addis, aden, adeno, ades, adiantum, adler, admin, adonai, adrian, aemia, aeneas, aeneid, aeolia, aeolis, aeolus, afdc, agism, agnes, agones, agra, agri, agro, agrostis, ahab, ahmed, aholic, aidan, aires, aise, aisne, alai, alamein, alan, alaric, albans, albany, alberta, albumins, albus, alcaeus, alderney, aleck, alecky, alecto, aleichem, aleppo, alex, alfredo, alfv, algernon, algia, alhambra, alia, alios, alison, alistair, alkanes, alkenes, alkies, alla, allan, alles, allo, almer, alocasia, alosa, alpheus, alphonse, alsace, alta, altai, alton, alvin, amadeus, amanda, amati, ambi, ambones, amer, ames, amiens, amore, amorpha, amos, amoy, amphi, amur, anacreon, anarcho, anasazi, anatole, ance, anchises, ancien, ancy, anders, anderson, andr, andrea, andreas, andrews, andro, androus, andry, ands, andy, anecdota, anemo, angelo, angio, angiomas, anglesey, anguilla, angus, anhui, anim, aniso, anjou, annam, anne, annie, anno, annus, anselm, anson, antero, antho, anthropo, antioch, apelles, apennine, aper, apgar, appleton, appliqu, approx, apso, apulia, arak, aral, aram, aran, archaean, archaeo, archaeol, archeo, archi, arctica, arden, aren, arezzo, ariadne, aristae, arium, arius, ariz, arkansan, arminian, arminius, armlike, armoric, armorica, arnaise, arnhem, arno, aron, arran, arri, arte, artemia, arterio, arthro, artily, ascents, ashe, ashley, asians, asio, assed, assisi, assoc, assr, asti, astm, aston, astor, astro, asturias, ataraxic, aten, ation, ative, ator, atropin, attica, attn, atto, attrib, atty, aubrey, aufkl, augsburg, augusta, auguste, augustus, auks, aumur, aurelius, auriga, austen, australe, auvergne, avernus, aves, avignon, avis, aviv, avogadro, avon, awes, awns, axone, axonemal, azar, azores, azov, aztecs, azuki, azur, baas, babi, babism, backroom, bacterio, bactria, baden, baffin, baglike, baha, bahia, bahr, baht, bain, baines, bains, baird, baku, balearic, ballahou, ballard, balt, bamako, bancroft, bandlike, bangor, bankerly, baptisia, barbuda, barbudan, barbules, barclay, bareilly, barents, bargy, bari, barisal, barnabas, barnes, barnet, barnum, baro, barr, barrett, bart, baruch, baryonic, basho, basi, basse, bastia, batboy, batesian, bathy, bator, baum, beal, beaton, beatrice, bechuana, beckett, becois, bede, bedford, beene, bela, belfast, belitung, belize, bella, bemba, benito, bennett, bentham, bentley, benzo, berberis, bere, berenice, bergen, berkley, berlioz, bermudan, bern, bernard, berne, bert, bertie, bertrand, bess, bessel, bessie, bethe, betsy, beurre, bevan, beverly, bevin, biafra, biafran, biblio, bichon, bien, bifida, bingeing, bingham, binging, biog, biriani, biryani, biscay, biscotti, bissau, bius, blair, blaise, blake, blas, blasto, blearily, bleeper, bleeps, bleu, blindman, blivit, blondish, bluets, blythe, bocce, bock, bodysurf, boeotia, boer, boers, bohr, bois, boke, bokhara, bokm, bolton, bona, bonaire, bonheur, bonn, bono, bons, boojum, boos, bornholm, boro, bosch, bose, bossa, bosworth, bothe, boudins, boul, bourke, bourr, boutant, boutonni, bowen, boyd, boyle, boyne, brac, bradbury, bradford, bradley, bradshaw, brady, bragg, brainily, brama, brandade, bras, braxton, braz, breda, brendan, brescia, brest, bret, brezhnev, brian, bric, brie, brien, brighton, bris, britons, broglie, brom, bront, brooke, bros, browne, bruce, bruckner, bruges, brummel, brung, bryant, bryn, buchanan, buckley, buckner, buena, buenos, buffos, bulbils, bulblike, bullae, bullpen, bunyan, burbs, burk, burkina, burkitt, burne, burney, burnham, burnsian, burs, burt, buru, burundi, busto, butanoic, buts, butut, bylined, byob, byron, caba, cabler, caboclo, cachaca, caco, cadmus, cady, caelum, caen, caesarea, caesars, caff, cagliari, cagney, cagy, cahow, caine, cajuns, calabar, calais, calamari, calc, calci, calcutta, caliche, calicut, callisto, calvados, calvin, camassia, cambria, cameron, camille, camis, camo, campania, campbell, campeche, campions, cams, cana, canap, canberra, candelas, canids, canis, cannes, canopic, canute, capella, capensis, capetian, caplet, caplike, caponata, capri, capsian, capt, caranx, carbaryl, carboxy, cardi, cardio, carey, cargill, caria, carian, carib, caribs, carleton, carlist, carlists, carlo, carlos, carlson, carlton, carlyle, carmel, carnac, carne, carole, carpo, carr, carrara, carrie, carroll, carson, carta, carthage, cary, caseosa, caspar, cass, cassini, cassius, castell, castro, cata, catalans, cath, cathar, cathari, cathars, cathay, cato, catullus, cava, cavae, cayuga, cctv, cebus, cecil, cecilia, cecropia, cedi, cedric, ceilidh, cele, celom, centi, cephal, cephalo, cepheus, cerenkov, cern, cero, cert, cetacea, ceteris, cetus, ceuta, ceviche, chaco, chadless, chagas, chagatai, chalazia, chalcis, chaldaic, chaldea, chaldee, chalon, chamb, chamel, champak, chantal, chapatti, chaplin, charcot, charente, charg, chartres, chas, chass, chatham, chaucer, chch, cheiro, chekhov, chelae, chelsea, chem, chemi, chemin, chemo, chen, cheops, ches, chesnut, chetrum, chewa, cheyenne, chia, chicana, chich, chieti, chilo, chios, chippewa, chiron, chisholm, chlor, chloro, chner, choi, chole, chomsky, chon, chondro, chou, christi, chromat, chromato, chron, chrono, chryso, chuan, chumash, chunnel, churring, cide, cigaret, cilantro, cilicia, cilician, cineol, cion, circean, circinus, ciskei, cistron, cistus, citato, citral, cladist, claes, claire, clammer, clara, clare, clarissa, clarke, classist, clat, claude, claudia, claudius, clausum, clawlike, claylike, clayton, clich, clifford, clifton, clinton, cliver, cloisonn, clovis, clublike, clyde, cnut, cobb, cobham, coch, cockered, cocoyam, cods, cody, coele, coeli, coeno, coenurus, coeur, cohen, coho, coit, colchis, coleman, colet, coley, colicin, colloq, collum, colous, colp, colugos, comblike, comice, comm, commoved, compere, compton, comtism, comtist, conan, concr, conelike, conf, cong, connelly, connie, connolly, connor, connors, conrad, consomm, cont, convenor, conway, cooke, cooley, copro, copt, copts, copyable, corbin, corch, corda, cordlike, corinth, coriolis, cornelia, corneum, cornify, corol, corpocracies, corrigan, cort, corti, cortico, corv, coryph, cosmo, costello, coth, coting, cotswold, couldn, coupage, cowley, cowper, cowy, coxae, cracy, craftsy, cranio, crat, crawford, crenshaw, cresyl, crichton, crim, crimea, cris, crispus, crit, croats, croc, croce, croesus, croker, cromwell, crookery, crookes, crosby, crowdie, crowley, crucis, crumhorn, crura, crusoe, crustose, cruz, cryo, cubans, cufic, culs, cumae, cuman, cumbria, cumbrian, cumulo, cunha, cuplike, cupr, cupro, cura, curtis, curzon, custardy, cutgrass, cyano, cyathium, cyclades, cyclase, cygnus, cyma, cymric, cynthia, cyperus, cyrene, cyril, cystlike, cyte, cytidine, cytisus, cyto, cytol, cytosol, czechs, dacia, dacian, dactylo, daedalus, dagwood, dahomean, dahomey, daimyos, dakin, dakotan, dalai, dalasi, dall, damon, dana, dandie, danegelt, danelaw, dangly, daniels, danite, danny, danse, dante, dantean, danton, danubian, danzig, daps, dapsone, dard, darien, darius, dartmoor, dateness, dave, davidson, davie, davis, davy, dawes, dawson, dayak, daye, deane, debs, debye, deca, decaf, decanoic, deci, declaw, deco, deerlike, deferens, defoe, deforces, dehisces, dehra, deirdre, deka, della, delos, demi, dempsey, dendro, denis, denise, dennis, dente, dentils, deoxy, deplumed, dept, dermat, dermato, dermo, derri, derring, desmond, deum, deut, deuter, deutero, deutsche, dewey, dhurrie, diamant, diane, diapiric, dias, diazinon, dich, dict, dictu, didn, dieing, diels, diemen, diestrum, diff, digby, dijon, dikaryon, dillon, dims, dins, dionysia, diphasic, dipl, diplexer, diplo, diquat, dirac, dirige, disant, dishiest, disney, diss, dist, divi, divorc, dixon, dizygous, djibouti, dnase, dnieper, doble, dobles, dobro, docetist, dodona, doesn, dogrib, doine, dolmades, dolmas, dolorosa, domingo, dominica, domo, donald, donax, donn, donner, donovan, dons, doon, dooring, dopa, doppelg, dopy, dordogne, dorians, dorking, dorothea, dorothy, dorr, dors, dorset, dorso, doubs, doum, douro, dovey, downey, doyle, dracaena, dravidic, droplike, druids, drummond, dryden, drywall, dubai, duboisia, dubs, duchenne, dumfries, dumpty, duncan, dunkers, dunkirk, duns, dunstan, durango, durban, dwight, dyak, dyaks, dyck, dylan, eagled, earlike, eaton, ebcdic, ebro, ecce, eccl, eccles, echinococci, echium, echoey, econ, ecto, ectomy, edam, edda, eddic, eddie, edenic, edessa, edgar, edgily, edison, edith, edmund, edmunds, edna, edom, edta, edward, edwards, edwin, egbert, egeria, egested, eggless, eggy, egis, eifel, eigen, eileen, eing, elam, elamites, elba, elbe, elbert, eleanor, eleusine, elgar, elias, elijah, elinor, eliot, elis, elisha, eliza, elks, ella, ellen, elliot, ellis, ellison, elmo, elodea, eloigned, elsa, elsinore, elul, elvira, elvis, emanuel, emerson, emia, emil, emile, emilia, emily, emma, emmanuel, emmeline, emmy, emoter, empanada, employe, empt, emptive, ence, encephal, enchases, ency, endo, endrin, enfield, engels, enid, enoki, enol, enolase, enolic, enrooted, ensouled, entero, ento, entomo, entr, entrec, entrep, entropic, enwombed, enwraps, eous, ephahs, ephesian, ephesus, epirus, episomal, epoxied, eprom, equi, eras, erasmus, erastus, erat, ergs, eridanus, erie, ernesto, ernie, erodium, erotize, errs, erse, erskine, erucic, eryngium, erythr, erythro, esau, esce, escence, escent, escheats, esis, espa, esque, essenism, essex, este, estella, estriol, etagere, ethician, ethno, ethoxy, eton, etruria, etrurian, ette, euboea, euler, euphenic, euphotic, euploid, euploidy, eurocrat, eury, euryale, eusebius, eustele, evan, evans, evelyn, everett, evers, evill, ewart, ewing, exeter, exmoor, exod, exonic, extenso, eyelike, eyra, eyry, ezek, faber, fabius, fabulate, facedly, facemask, factness, factoids, fads, faeroese, faggoted, fags, fagus, fairfax, faits, fajita, faliscan, falkland, falmouth, falutin, fancily, fannie, fante, fanti, fasciae, faso, fata, fatha, fatima, fatimid, fatimite, faulkner, faut, faute, fauvists, fava, fawkes, fays, feal, feater, featest, fehling, feijoada, fein, felafel, felicia, fellator, femto, fera, ferguson, fermat, ferme, fernando, ferous, ferro, feyly, feynman, fianc, fibro, fibs, fication, fice, fictiveness, fide, fido, fifo, filaree, filariae, filo, filtre, fingal, finley, finno, fireable, fireclay, firn, fischer, fishmeal, fisk, fitz, fixe, flamb, flanders, flapless, flaubert, fleurs, flim, florian, flukily, fluoro, flysheet, foie, folacin, folate, fons, foote, footlike, foram, forbes, forkball, formosa, fornax, fors, forster, forsyte, foucault, foule, foveolae, foxtrots, fractals, fraktur, fran, francas, frances, franche, francis, frankish, franz, frapp, fraser, frcs, fred, frederic, freebase, frenches, freq, friesian, fris, frisbee, frittata, friuli, frou, froude, frutti, fuddy, fuego, fujian, fula, fulmined, furanose, furness, fust, fyke, gaba, gadgety, gads, gael, gaels, gags, gaia, gail, galatia, galatian, galenist, galium, gallo, gallup, galois, gama, gamay, gambusia, gammoned, gamo, gams, gandy, ganga, ganges, gant, gantt, garand, garcinia, gard, garda, gardiner, gardism, gardist, gareth, garfield, garni, garonne, garou, garrett, garrick, garrigue, gars, gary, gascony, gasque, gasted, gaston, gastr, gastro, gateau, gatsby, gatt, gaul, gaullism, gauls, gauzily, gaveled, gaveling, gawain, gaza, gdansk, geed, gees, gefilte, gehrig, gelato, gell, gels, gemaric, geminian, gemlike, gemmules, gemote, genevan, genevese, genghis, genoise, genro, gentium, geny, georgics, georgina, gerald, gerard, germaine, gerry, gessoed, geum, ghent, giardia, gibbs, gibson, gideon, giga, gigo, gigs, gila, gilead, gime, gimme, ginzo, girned, gironde, giselle, gite, giza, glac, gladys, glasnost, glauber, gley, glia, glochid, glomus, glozed, gluc, glucagon, gluck, glumes, gluon, gluons, glyco, gmat, gnatlike, goaty, gobs, godfrey, godwin, goethe, goethean, goethite, gogh, gogol, goldberg, golgi, gond, gonds, gonif, gono, goode, gooders, goodism, goodwin, goombah, gordius, gordon, gorm, goth, gotham, goths, gotland, gouda, gould, govt, gower, goya, goys, graaff, graafian, gracie, graeco, grainger, gramma, grammy, grandes, grano, grapey, grapher, gras, gravlax, greene, greenfly, greig, gren, grenoble, gresham, grex, gridded, griffith, grignard, grimm, grimsby, griot, gris, grises, grokked, groucho, grus, gruy, guangxi, guanylic, guar, guelder, guelf, guelph, guelphs, guenons, guiana, guido, guienne, guillain, guin, guinness, guizhou, gulag, gummas, gung, gunn, gunnera, gurdy, gurkha, gustav, gustave, guthrie, gutsily, gybes, gybing, gyne, gyno, gyps, habakkuk, habitu, haboob, habsburg, hachures, hadley, hadn, hadrian, haem, haemato, haemo, hagar, hagen, haggadah, haggai, hagio, haida, haig, haight, haka, halacha, haled, halesia, halley, hallowe, halluces, halm, halon, hamadan, hamites, hamitic, hamito, hammond, hampton, hams, hancock, hannah, hannibal, hanover, hans, hansen, happi, haps, hapsburg, haptenic, hara, harcourt, hari, harley, harmon, harold, haroun, harriet, harrison, harum, harz, hashanah, hasidic, hasidism, hasn, hassid, hawke, hawkins, haws, hazzan, hdtv, headwear, hebei, hebrides, hebron, hecate, hecto, hedera, hedral, hedron, heebie, hegel, hegirae, heimlich, heine, hela, helena, helenium, heli, hellenes, helpe, helter, helvetii, hemato, heme, hemi, hemic, hemo, henan, hendrick, hendrix, henle, henley, henson, hepato, hepburn, hept, hepta, hera, herat, herbart, herbed, herbert, herbes, herders, herero, herky, herman, herods, herriot, herschel, hesiod, hester, heter, hetty, heuchera, hexa, hexosan, hexoses, hiberno, hidey, hied, hiero, hies, higgins, higgledy, higgles, hilda, hilo, hilton, hines, hiram, hispano, histo, histones, hittites, hler, hmas, hmcs, hobart, 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scheldt, schiff, schizzy, schmidt, schr, schubert, schwann, scienter, scipio, scire, scopy, scotty, scotus, scried, scry, scuffer, sculpins, scutes, scuzzier, sealyham, sean, seances, seato, sech, seedlike, seismo, selen, selkirk, semillon, semilog, seminoma, semites, semple, sendai, sente, sephardi, septage, seqq, serbo, serbs, sero, serosal, serv, sess, seth, setswana, severn, sevruga, sewable, sexily, seymour, shabu, shaley, shamash, shangri, shannon, shanter, shantou, sharia, sharon, shasta, shavuot, shekinah, shelley, shem, sheridan, sherman, sherpas, shia, shiah, shih, shiites, shikse, shiloh, shimming, shiraz, shoepack, shouldn, showbiz, shtik, shuttler, siang, sichuan, sickbay, sicke, sidedly, sideless, sidero, sidon, sids, siena, sikhs, silphium, simeon, simmons, simone, simpson, simson, sinclair, singh, sinn, sion, sirach, sistance, sistine, situ, sitz, sivaism, skatol, skinlike, skis, skived, skives, skunked, skurry, skye, slalomer, slav, slbm, sleeked, slitty, sliven, sloane, slubbed, smetana, smirkily, smithson, smogless, smoothes, sneery, snellen, snowdon, soay, sobieski, socio, socotra, soie, soign, soir, solf, somalian, somalis, somme, songhai, sono, sophie, sops, sorbs, sordini, sorptive, soto, sotto, souffl, souped, sous, southey, sovkhoz, soweto, soya, spartina, spas, spectro, spenser, spermato, spezia, spheno, sphygmo, spiles, spinelle, spinules, spiro, spotlit, spurges, spurlike, squibbed, squirmer, srna, ssbauer, stadt, stafford, stan, standup, stanley, stanton, starr, statelet, staunton, steele, stefan, steiner, steller, sten, stenog, stenos, steplike, ster, stevens, stewart, stewy, stillson, stipules, stoddard, stoep, stol, stomas, stomato, stomy, stotinki, strakes, strauss, strepto, striata, stromal, stuart, stubbs, stums, sturm, stye, subsp, succoth, sudeten, suer, sues, suey, suffolk, sufis, suiter, sulawesi, sulf, sullivan, sulu, summum, sunnah, sunspace, superhelically, supp, sups, supt, surprize, susa, susanne, susie, sussed, suzanne, suzette, suzuki, sverdrup, swabian, swansea, sweeney, swindon, sybaris, sydenham, sympatry, synagog, syntenic, synteny, synth, syrette, szechuan, tabriz, tacan, tachy, tacitus, tackie, taconic, tadzhik, taeniae, taffia, taft, tagetes, tagma, tagmata, tagus, taimyr, taino, tajiks, taka, tali, talkback, tamarins, tambala, tamils, tammany, tammuz, tampico, tanagra, tanger, tankless, tannins, tans, tanz, tara, taranto, tarentum, targum, tarlike, tars, tarted, tartily, tarting, tasso, tatars, tate, tats, tatum, taunton, tauto, taylor, tbsp, teau, teaux, tebet, tebeth, tecta, tectal, tedding, teed, tees, tefl, tegu, tehran, teleosts, telia, telo, tempe, tenens, tenentes, tenerife, tenn, tennyson, tente, tentered, tentlike, tepary, tera, terence, teresa, terpenes, terr, tertium, terza, tesl, tess, testae, tetani, tetr, teucrium, teutons, tevet, tewa, texel, thaddeus, thatchy, thea, theban, thebans, theo, theresa, thess, thetis, thimblerigs, thiotepa, thira, thisaway, thomson, thon, thoreau, thornton, thrid, thromb, thrombo, thummim, thur, thurrock, thurs, thymoma, thyro, tian, tibetans, tibicen, ticino, ticky, tics, tien, tientsin, tierra, tigre, timucua, tise, tissular, titicaca, titis, titman, titrator, titus, tlich, tlingit, tmeses, tobias, tobit, todd, toea, togoland, togs, toms, tomy, toney, tonging, toni, tonks, tonys, tooke, topo, topsider, torbay, torrens, tors, tosca, tostadas, toto, tots, totten, toulon, tourette, towne, townes, townsend, tows, toxi, toxico, toxo, trabzon, tracy, transf, transp, travers, trendies, trent, triatoma, trich, tricho, tricing, trieste, trimeric, trna, trollope, tron, trop, troph, tropho, tropo, trouv, troyes, trudeau, trujillo, tryin, tsuga, tsunamic, tswana, tterd, tuaregs, tubist, tucana, tucum, tude, tudors, tues, tung, ture, turkmens, tuts, tuxedoed, tweely, twere, twinleaf, tylose, tylosin, tyndall, tyson, udaipur, ufos, uglies, uighur, ulama, ulva, umayyad, umbrians, umps, unglues, ungluing, unio, univ, unkink, unmowed, unsurely, updike, upstager, uptempo, upton, urano, urates, urbe, uria, urim, urns, urogram, uronic, ursa, ursi, ursula, uruses, usaf, usda, usnic, ussr, utahan, utero, utrecht, utricles, vade, vagally, vagi, vails, valdez, valens, vampy, vanned, vanuatu, varden, variceal, vaso, vats, vatu, vaudois, vaughan, veblen, veddah, veddas, veii, veinlike, velout, venatici, vendable, venereum, veneris, venn, ventro, verbum, verd, verde, vere, verne, verner, vernix, vernon, verrucae, vers, verte, vertuous, vetivert, vets, vety, viably, vibist, vibrioid, vicenza, vicu, vienne, vies, vila, villany, vince, vinland, vinnie, vins, viomycin, virgoan, virogenesis, visigoth, vistula, vitellogenetic, vitex, vittae, vitus, vivandi, viverrid, vivian, vivien, vladimir, vlbi, vlcc, vlsi, vocab, voce, voguer, vogul, voil, voir, voix, volap, volente, vologda, voltan, vorous, vosges, voto, vous, vres, vtol, waals, wads, waite, walapai, wald, waldo, wallace, wallis, walpole, walsall, walsy, walters, walton, wanda, warburg, wasn, waterski, waverley, wayne, wazoo, webb, weer, weil, weldon, weller, wels, weren, wergeld, werner, wernicke, wesley, weston, weymouth, wharton, wheatley, whipple, whitby, whitman, whitney, whys, wichitas, widal, wilbur, wilcox, wilde, wilfred, wilfrid, wilkes, wilkie, wilkins, willa, willard, williams, willis, wilmot, wingtip, wingtips, winifred, winnie, winston, winthrop, witcher, woking, wolfe, wolffian, wolfang, wonton, woodie, woodrow, woogie, woolf, woos, wooster, worde, worlder, wouldn, wows, wushu, wyandot, wyandots, wyatt, wych, xantho, xantippe, xavier, xeno, xero, xiamen, xiang, xmas, xtian, xylo, yackety, yagi, yams, yana, yaps, yarmouth, yavapai, yeats, yecch, yhwh, yipes, yips, ylang, ymca, yodh, yoghourt, yorkers, yorkists, yoruban, ypres, yucat, yuchi, yuchis, yunnan, yurok, ywca, zagros, zags, zaragoza, zastruga, zech, zeeland, zeeman, zeno, zeph, zhejiang, zhou, ziegler, zigs, zinn, zips, zircaloy, zola, zoot, zouaves, zululand, zygo, zymo

I would appreciate any buggy word spotted in above list, I have already boldfaced many of them. All prefixes and suffixes are to be excluded - they have no usage outwith the monolith words. I hate abbreviations, yet I didn't exclude 'Mlles' (Mesdemoiselles) and 'Mmes' (Mesdames), 'Mlle' (Mademoiselle) to be added. Most of the above listed words are kind of annoying, however a good spell-checker must be aware of them. Just an example, in above list there is 'ymca' but not 'ymha':

YMCA
abbr.
Young Men's Christian Association.

/HERITAGE/

YMHA
abbr.
Young Men's Hebrew Association.

/HERITAGE/

I would rather remove all the abbreviated words/phrases, check this stupid one (also in above list):
TEFL
abbr.
teaching English as a foreign language.

/HERITAGE/

The same goes for 'TOEFL'. Also, 'trna', 'usaf', 'usda', 'ussr'. In my opinion these abominations are not words. The proper usage is to put a dot after each letter.

He learns not to learn and reverts to what all men pass by.
leonAzul
Posted: Saturday, March 22, 2014 7:29:09 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 8/11/2011
Posts: 7,965
Neurons: 25,156
Location: Miami, Florida, United States
Many of the words in bold are not complete words at all but rather fragments, prefixes, suffixes, or combinatory elements. This is where pattern-matching is your friend, and why periodically testing for rules of construction would make your list much more valuable.

In my humble opinion, of course you should not apply inappropriate bias before you have a significant database to work with, but neither should you wait to complete the list before some tentative or statistical analysis is applied, because there is no end to the list. The list that can be listed is not the complete list (apologies to laozi).

Angel


"Make it go away, Mrs Whatsit," he whispered. "Make it go away. It's evil."
leonAzul
Posted: Saturday, March 22, 2014 7:56:55 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 8/11/2011
Posts: 7,965
Neurons: 25,156
Location: Miami, Florida, United States
Sanmayce wrote:

The same goes for 'TOEFL'. Also, 'trna', 'usaf', 'usda', 'ussr'. In my opinion these abominations are not words. The proper usage is to put a dot after each letter.

You are mistaken in this. Language and its orthography are dynamic; they change in response to the needs of the speakers and writers who use them on a daily basis.

The need for written English to be readily legible in print and on digitized screens has caused an immense change in "proper" orthography over the last four decades.

In short, acronyms are most clearly denoted by printing them in all upper case letters without additional punctuation. Thus, "USA" is the correct abbreviation for "The United States of America", and not "U. S. A."

Only when used in the contexts of mathematics and machine languages as variables or in marketing as a trademark is it proper to use lowercase letters and punctuation like that, and even then it is done to intentionally distinguish a special use of the word apart from everyday language.

There is still a large corpus of text that adheres to older styles of punctuation because they remain expressive. The most obvious is the continued use of the apostrophe to indicate contractions involving "not", "have", "am", "is", "will", "would", etc., along with the (now considered) very formal abbreviations of address such as "Mr." and "Mrs."


"Make it go away, Mrs Whatsit," he whispered. "Make it go away. It's evil."
Sanmayce
Posted: Monday, March 24, 2014 2:35:45 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 5/29/2012
Posts: 193
Neurons: 975
Location: Sofia, Sofia-Capital, Bulgaria
Caramba, the beautiful shot from 'Captain Apache' from my lats post is gone.



The original dialogue was this:
- Are you looking for something?
- Yes.
- What?
- I don't know.
- It's surprising what you can turn up if you just keep looking.


I have to watch it again.

>This is where pattern-matching is your friend, and why periodically testing for rules of construction would make your list much more valuable.
Agreed, as you said they are very handy in forging and analyses but those fragmets have no place in the list.

>The list that can be listed is not the complete list (apologies to laozi).
Apologies! What for? Quite well said, yet AFAIU (no one writes 'A.F.A.I.U.', stands for 'As Far As I Understand') your idea is to be much more less restrictive than I wanna be, that way, the more appropriate sayings would be: "The Great Tailor cuts little."
Leon, my goal is not to mimic the Dictionaries' 'ways' but to follow the spell-check policy where each word has its own standalone role. I catch myself using abominations like above one 'AFAIU', however when comes to 1-gram list used for spell-checking or more precisely said spell-suggesting such trash makes the corpus tainted.
Outside Masakari, e.g. 'USA' may have its properness, not in a wordlist for general spell-checking. Have you noticed how the laziness quickly turns into ugliness, don't tell me that is a new orthography trend, as in abominable 'eg' and 'ie', I see many people to omit the dots 'for their convenience'.

http://public.wsu.edu/~brians/errors/e.g.html

>In my humble opinion, of course you should not apply inappropriate bias before you have a significant database to work with, ...
Here you are partially right, because I do want to screen more severely than is necessary.
To tell you the truth I don't believe that I will succeed, this troubles me little though, one of my weird strengths is that I don't care for the outcome/result, I care for keeping the spirit of constant enriching and bettering the x-gram lists alive.

>The need for written English to be readily legible in print and on digitized screens has caused an immense change in "proper" orthography over the last four decades.
No problem in my eyes even if one day all the people start to use mostly simplified/crippled/abominated 'words' up to 8-9 letters in length or 'thanx' instead of 'thanks', my wish is simply to have all the good stuff under one roof not relying on third party resources, the trends and styles are of no concern to me.

>In short, acronyms are most clearly denoted by printing them in all upper case letters without additional punctuation. Thus, "USA" is the correct abbreviation for "The United States of America", and not "U. S. A."
I won't argue with that, I argue about including acronyms/abbreviations into the wordlist.

>...very formal abbreviations of address such as "Mr." and "Mrs."
Ha-ha, this is funny, once I used the full form and no reply followed, that is, 'MISTRESS' instead of 'Mrs.', I guess one of the bottom meanings struck a chord, I remember using 'Masteress' crossed my mind then.

Leon, one example for 100% atrociousness occurred to me - 'PhD':
Doctor of Philosophy


He learns not to learn and reverts to what all men pass by.
Sanmayce
Posted: Wednesday, March 26, 2014 1:17:47 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 5/29/2012
Posts: 193
Neurons: 975
Location: Sofia, Sofia-Capital, Bulgaria
Time for Round #3, fashioning the mumbo-jumbisms into one pretty useful wordlist called 'Goyathlay' featuring 656,563 distinct words.



Yes, the famous Geronimo.
A medicine man and prophet of the Chiricahua Apache who, in the latter part of the 19th century, acquired notoriety through his opposition to the authorities...

That is the spirit I want to preserve, a free man against all the assheads in the world.

'Goyathlay' is composed of 5 wordlists, the nifty thing about it is the ability to filter words by their appearance within all the 2^5-1=31 possible mixes.

Wordlist #1, called 'H', is derived from filtered HERITAGE dictionary, features 136,587 words.
Wordlist #2, called 'L', is derived from filtered LATIN descriptive list, features 84,668 words.
Wordlist #3, called 'M', is derived from MASAKARI, features 319,675 words.
Wordlist #4, called 'S', is derived from filtered SOED, features 205,873 words.
Wordlist #5, called 'W', is derived from filtered English Wiktionary (2014 February), features 421,106 words.

For example, if you want all words appearing into the five lists the first word in your new wordlist will be 'a' because its attributes are HLMSW (an uppercased letter means that this word appears within this wordlist).
As for 'aa' it will not be included into the new wordlist because it appears only in HERITAGE&SOED&Wiktionary, HlmSW.

That is how 'Goyathlay.txt' looks like:

HLMSW a
HlmSW aa
HlmSW aaa
...
HlMSW claptrap
hlmSw claptrappy
hlMsW claptraps
HlMSW claque
hlmsW claques
hlMSW claqueur
hlMsW claqueurs
...
hlMSW nebris
hlmsW nebs
HlMSW nebuchadnezzar
hlmsW nebuchadnezzars
hlMsw nebuchadrezzar
hlmSW nebul
HLMSW nebula
HLMSW nebulae
hlmsW nebulalike
hlMsw nebulaphobia
HlMSW nebular
hlMSw nebularia
...
hlMsW necessaire
hlMsw necessaires
hLmsw necessare
hLmsw necessari
hLmsw necessaria
hLmsw necessariae
hlMSW necessarian
hlMSW necessarianism
hlMSW necessarians
hLMSw necessarie
HlMSW necessaries
hlmsW necessariest
hLmsw necessarii
HlMSW necessarily
hlMSW necessariness
hLmsw necessario
hLMSw necessarium
hLMsw necessarius
hlMsw necessarly
HlMSW necessary
hLmsw necessatus
hLmsw necessavi
hLmsw necesse
hLmsw necessest
hLmsw necessis
hlMsw necessism
HlMSW necessitarian
HlMSW necessitarianism
hlMSW necessitarians
hLMSw necessitas
hlMsw necessitat
HlMSW necessitate
HlMSW necessitated
HlMSW necessitates
HlMSW necessitating
HlMSW necessitation
hLmsW necessitatis
HlMsw necessitative
hlMsw necessite
hlmSw necessitie
hlMSW necessitied
HlMSW necessities
HlMSW necessitous
HlMSW necessitously
hlMSW necessitousness
hlMSW necessitude
hlmsW necessitudes
hLmsw necessitudinis
hLMsw necessitudo
HlMSW necessity
hLmsw necesso
hLmsw necessum
hLmsw necessus
...
hLMSW zythum
hlmsW zyxin
hlmsW zyxins
HlMsW zyzzyva
hlmsW zyzzyvas
hlmSw zz
hlmSw zze
hlmSw zzes
hlmSw zzi
hlmSw zzos
hlmsW zzyzx
hlmsW zzz
hlmsW zzzed
hlmsW zzzing
hlmsW zzzs


The dandyism 'claptrappy' appears only in SOED.

Ay-ay-ya! Only Masakari holds the 'nebuchadrezzar', at first I thought it was a bug but it is ok: Nebuchadrezzar also Nebuchadnezzar.
Excellentia, having 'necessarius' feels good.

multiplicious, adjective.
Long rare. E17.
[App. from Latin multiplic-: see MULTIPLY verb, -IOUS.]
Multiplex.

/SOED/

Next playful synonyms for richly/richness are missing:
multipliciousLY
multipliciousNESS


Also 'Hauff' is missing - intolerable, not to mention the playful 'hauffesquely' as in the 2-gram 'hauffesquely_spellbinding'.

Oh, what a crime against warriorism, Marshal Manstein is nowhere to be found, even in German Moby corpus, are we living on one planet, Marshal Paulus is nowhere to find too.

Also on prima vista I don't see the beautiful 'buran' derivatives, in case of not knowing the Russian shuttle is named after the Asian heavy snowstorm.



Often I need a mindstopper, a word that describes the powerfulness and speed of some etude avoiding the cliches as the gorgeous:
'buranesquely_captivating', wut-wut, 2-grams of gold, pretty much as the classic 'gone_with_the_wind' but stormier (more storming).

...
* storming: adjective (a) that storms; (b) slang (chiefly Sport) displaying outstanding vigour, speed, or skill; (c) slang excellent, fantastic: M16.
/SOED/

stormy, adjective.
ME.
[from STORM noun + -Y1.]
1. (Of the weather, sky, sea, etc.) disturbed or affected by a storm or tempest; wild, rough, tempestuous; (of a place or region) subject to storms. ME.
Milton: Beyond the stormy Hebrides. Manchester Examiner An Atlantic steamer..ploughing..across stormy oceans.
2. (Of a person, an expression, etc.) angry, angry-looking; (of an event, period, etc.) full of or characterized by violent or emotional outbursts. ME.
Ina Taylor: Stepchildren, with whom she had..a stormy relationship. Times The Central Committee postponed a final assessment..after a stormy debate.
3. Associated or connected with storms; indicative or symbolic of storms. poet. M16.
Special collocations: stormy petrel = STORM PETREL.
* stormily adverb LME.
* storminess noun L16.

/SOED/

How much nicer 'with whom she had..a burany/buranesque relationship' sounds, ha-ha, reminds me of 'burlesque'.

stormy
adj. stormier, stormiest
1. Subject to, characterized by, or affected by storms; tempestuous.
2. Characterized by violent emotions, passions, speech, or actions: a stormy argument.
stormily adv.
storminess n.

/HERITAGE/

burany
buranier
buraniest
buranily
buraniness
buranize
buranizes
buranizing
buranized
buranned
buranesque
buranesquely
buranian
buranianist
buranianists
buranic
buranish

buran, noun.
M19.
[Russian from Turkic boran.]
In the steppes, a snowstorm, esp. one accompanied by high winds; a blizzard.

/SOED/

Japanize, verb trans.
Also Japanise. L19.
[formed as JAPANISM + -IZE.]
Make Japanese.
* Japanization noun L19.

/SOED/

japanned, adjective.
L17.
[from JAPAN verb, JAPAN noun: see -ED1, -ED2.]
1. That has been japanned. L17.
japanned leather: treated with Japan lacquer and dried by heat.
2. (Japanned.) Made or become Japanese. rare. M19.

/SOED/

Japanesque, adjective & noun.
L19.
[from JAPAN noun + -ESQUE.]
A. adjective. Japanese in style or manner. L19.
B. noun. A design or ornament in Japanese style. L19.

/SOED/

Iranian, noun & adjective.
L18.
[from Iran (see below) + -IAN.]
A. noun.
1. A native or inhabitant of Iran (formerly Persia), a country in the Middle East; a speaker of an Iranian language. L18.
2. Linguistics. One of the two groups of languages in the Indo-Iranian branch of Indo-European, comprising Old Persian and Avestan and their modern descendants or cognates; the language of the Iranians. E19.
B. adjective. Of or pertaining to Iran (formerly Persia) or Iranian. M19.
* Iranianist noun a student of Iran or Iranian L20.
* Iranic adjective M19.
* Iranize verb trans. make Iranian in character etc. L19.

/SOED/

Alcoran, noun.
arch. Also Alkoran. LME.
[Old & mod. French from Arab. al-3ur'Qn: see AL-2, KORAN.]
The Koran.
* Alcoranic adjective M19.
* †Alcoranish adjective M17–M18.
* Alcoranist noun a person who adheres to the original text of the Koran E17.

/SOED/

Enough, hell no, looking deeply there are some nifty 'WOMAN' counterparts:

womanly, adjective.
ME.
[from WOMAN noun + -LY1.]
1. (Of a person, an act, etc.) having or showing the qualities or attributes (as gentleness, devotion, fearfulness, etc.) regarded as characteristic of or appropriate for women; (of a quality) characteristic of or appropriate for a woman, feminine. Formerly also, (of a man) effeminate. ME.
Southey: Womanly sobs were heard, and manly cheeks Were wet with silent tears. M. Kennedy Telemachus..upbraids his mother for not behaving like a womanly woman. A. Brookner Harmless womanly things, like spending money on clothes.
2. Having the character of, befitting, or characteristic of a woman as opp. to a girl. E18.
Steele: The Girl was very proud of the Womanly Employment of a Nurse. Dickens A short, brown, womanly girl of fourteen.
* womanliness noun M16.

/SOED/

womanish, adjective.
LME.
[from WOMAN noun + -ISH1.]
1. Of, pertaining to, or used by a woman or women. Now rare. LME.
2. Now chiefly derog.
a. Characteristic of or suitable for a woman or women. LME.
b. Resembling a woman, womanlike; spec. (a) (of a man) effeminate; (b) (of a girl) behaving like a woman. LME.
† 3. Excessively fond of women. rare. Only in 16.
* womanishly adverb L16.
* womanishness noun M16.

/SOED/

Thus:
buranly
buranliness
buranish !AGAIN, TO BACK UP THE "OBSOLETE" 'Alcoranish'! !Heh-heh, excessively fond of burans, me-me.!
buranishly
buranishness

Behaving like a woman/buran, how well this pair complements each other.

Enough, no way, not halved the list yet:

womanfully, adverb.
E19.
[from WOMAN noun after manfully: see -LY2.]
With womanly courage or perseverance.
Bucks Examiner: The two sopranos..rose womanfully to Mozart's demands.

/SOED/

womanhood, noun.
LME.
[from WOMAN noun + -HOOD.]
1. The state or condition of being a woman (as opp. to a man). LME.
b. The state of being a grown woman; female maturity. E17.
J. Dunn: Sisters groping their way towards womanhood, with no sympathetic older woman as..guide.
2. The disposition, character, or qualities natural to a woman; womanliness. LME.
Dickens: Miss Brass's maiden modesty and gentle womanhood.
3. Women collectively, womankind. E16.

/SOED/

womanism, noun.
M19.
[from WOMAN noun + -ISM.]
Advocacy of or enthusiasm for the rights, achievements, etc., of women; spec. (chiefly Black English) a form of feminism emphasizing the celebration of the contribution of women to society as a whole.

/SOED/

womanthrope, noun.
rare. L19.
[Joc. formation on WOMAN noun after misanthrope.]
A hater of women.

/SOED/

The joke is two-way, why SOED provided the haters' version only!?
It could be 'A lover of women', WOMAN noun after philanthrope.

Let's derive:
buranfully
buranhood
buranism

To continue the joke:
buranthrope
buranthropy
buranthropic
buranthropism
buranthropical
buranthropically
buranthropist
buranthropists
buranthropize !'philanthropize' verb (a) verb intrans. be philanthropic, practise philanthropy; (b) verb trans. treat (a person) philanthropically: E19.!
buranthropizes
buranthropized
buranthropizing
buranthropoid
buranthropoids

Hellenophile, adjective & noun.
Also Hellenophil /-fIl/. L19.
[from HELLENE + -O- + -PHIL, -PHILE.]
(A person who is) friendly towards or fond of Greece and things Greek.

/SOED/

buranophile
buranophiles
buranophil
buranophils
buranophilia
buranophilic
buranization !'Sudanization' noun the action or process of making Sudanese in character, ...!
buranizations

Germano-, combining form.
[from GERMAN noun1 & adjective1 + -O-.]
Forming adjectives and nouns with the sense 'German, of Germany'.
* Germano-Coleridgean adjective (rare) (of opinions) derived from German writers through Coleridge or from the Germans and Coleridge jointly M19.
* Germanomania noun a craze or excessive liking for Germany and things German L19.
* Germanophil(e) adjective & noun (a person who is) friendly towards Germany or fond of Germany and things German L19.
* Germanophilist noun = Germanophile noun M19.
* Germanophobe adjective & noun (a person who is) affected with Germanophobia E20.
* Germanophobia noun dread or dislike of Germany and things German L19.

/SOED/

buranomania
buranophilist
buranophilists
buranophobe
buranophobes
buranophobia
buranophobic

Well, 53 so far, more, more remain to be forged, of course for those who are obsessed with plays of Wind God.

buranesque
buranesquely
buranfully
buranhood
buranian
buranianist
buranianists
buranic
buranier
buraniest
buranily
buraniness
buranish
buranishly
buranishness
buranism
buranization
buranizations
buranize
buranized
buranizes
buranizing
buranliness
buranly
buranned
buranomania
buranophil
buranophile
buranophiles
buranophilia
buranophilic
buranophilist
buranophilists
buranophils
buranophobe
buranophobes
buranophobia
buranophobic
buranthrope
buranthropic
buranthropical
buranthropically
buranthropism
buranthropist
buranthropists
buranthropize
buranthropized
buranthropizes
buranthropizing
buranthropoid
buranthropoids
buranthropy
burany

I would forge a sentence for each one of the above buranids, but not now.
Looking back into 'buran' section of 'Goyathlay' I feel desolation:
...
hlmsW buraku
hlMsW burakumin
hlmsW burali
HlMSW buran
hlMsw buranelli
...

And to illustrate a single quick query I used Gallowwalker's case sensitive wildcard matching, here H#m#W* pattern:





From Round #2, the number for H&m&W was the same, 10128, 'it feels alright' as Beth sings.

Enfun!

We Shall Remain, Episode 4 Geronimo Part 7



Crazy! The most untamed said on his dead bed: "I should never have surrendered. I should have fought until I was the last man alive."
Really free people appear crazy to the "normal", that is for sure.

He learns not to learn and reverts to what all men pass by.
Sanmayce
Posted: Friday, March 28, 2014 2:19:17 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 5/29/2012
Posts: 193
Neurons: 975
Location: Sofia, Sofia-Capital, Bulgaria
Today I compiled a must-print index: Goyathlay_844-pages.pdf
It requires 422 sheets and is one must-have appendix to any English dictionary.



I love it.






He learns not to learn and reverts to what all men pass by.
Jyrkkä Jätkä
Posted: Friday, March 28, 2014 4:32:15 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/21/2009
Posts: 38,304
Neurons: 265,027
Location: Helsinki, Southern Finland Province, Finland
What can you get out of "Heautontimoroumenos"?


In the beginning there was nothing, which exploded.
Sanmayce
Posted: Monday, March 31, 2014 1:17:56 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 5/29/2012
Posts: 193
Neurons: 975
Location: Sofia, Sofia-Capital, Bulgaria
I don't get it.

Explanation:
'timoroumenos' (=he who punishes) 'heauton' (=himself)

/Panayota Georgakopoulou/

'Goyathlay' holds:
...
hlMsw>heautomorphism
hlMsw>heautontimorumenos
hlMsw>heautophany
...


"The play
itself, as the author tells us in the Prologue, is drawn from the Greek of
Menander, a distinguished writer of comedy, who was born at Athens B. C.
342 ; and who, as we are told, was the author of a hundred and eight come-
dies, of which only a few fragments now remain. " Heautontimorumenos,"
(EavTOVTi/XGOCfovjuevo?) which means, literally, "Taking Vengeance
on One's Self," is the name given to the play composed by Menander; and
Terence finding it more euphonious than its Latin synonym, gave it to his
own."

/Source: http://www.archive.org/stream/selftormentorhea00rico/#page/n7/mode/2up/

Why in the book they omitted the 'o' in 'Heautontimoroumenos', I don't know, perhaps it came this way because of Latin:
'HEAVTON TIMORVMENOS'

He learns not to learn and reverts to what all men pass by.
Jyrkkä Jätkä
Posted: Monday, March 31, 2014 3:01:59 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/21/2009
Posts: 38,304
Neurons: 265,027
Location: Helsinki, Southern Finland Province, Finland
Yes, it's Greek. And it's the title of one of the poems in Baudelaire's Fleurs du mal, "The Flowers of Evil".

The French poem, and several English translations, are here: http://fleursdumal.org/poem/151


In the beginning there was nothing, which exploded.
Sanmayce
Posted: Sunday, June 04, 2017 8:12:05 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 5/29/2012
Posts: 193
Neurons: 975
Location: Sofia, Sofia-Capital, Bulgaria
In order to address the "challenge" thrown by a popular YouTube channel, I made the richest on Internet 1-gram corpus, junkful, though.
The idea is to have all English words under one roof, in one sorted wordlist inhere at TFD forum.
The package (searchable) is downloadable at my Google Internet drive:
https://drive.google.com/file/d/0BzKgu_YpO6uZT0RHcEo1eEVacDA/view?usp=sharing

While Vsauce saying the word 'quizzaciously' appears in OED he is wrong, only the adjective but not the adverb is there.

The Zipf Mystery



https://drive.google.com/file/d/0BzKgu_YpO6uZMVJteGFxcHlzR3M/view?usp=sharing

A short description of used 1-gram corpora:

enwiki-20170101-pages-articles.xml_(37112070_words).wrd: 37,112,070 unique words

06/04/2017 02:11 AM 60,182,193,037 enwiki-20170101-pages-articles.xml
06/04/2017 02:11 AM 392,023,425 enwiki-20170101-pages-articles.xml_(37112070_words).wrd

Google_Books_corpus_All_Nodes_ripped_7477257_1gramlist_out_of_3473595_English_books.txt: 7,477,257 unique words

06/04/2017 02:11 AM 81,324,663 Google_Books_corpus_All_Nodes_ripped_7477257_1gramlist_out_of_3473595_English_books.txt

Oxford_English_Dictionary_2nd_Edition_Version_4_(En-En)_WHOLEWORDS.dsl_(1089240_words).wrd: 1,089,240 unique words

06/04/2017 02:11 AM 564,235,251 Oxford_English_Dictionary_2nd_Edition_Version_4_(En-En)_WHOLEWORDS.dsl
06/04/2017 02:11 AM 11,252,560 Oxford_English_Dictionary_2nd_Edition_Version_4_(En-En)_WHOLEWORDS.dsl_(1089240_words).wrd

Urban_Dictionary_2015_(Eng-Eng)_utf8.txt_(1454941_words).wrd: 1,454,941 unique words

06/04/2017 02:11 AM 900,933,776 Urban_Dictionary_2015_(Eng-Eng)_utf8.txt
06/04/2017 02:11 AM 15,093,413 Urban_Dictionary_2015_(Eng-Eng)_utf8.txt_(1454941_words).wrd

Webster's_Unabridged_3_(En-En)_WHOLEWORDS_ANSI.dsl_(364352_words).wrd: 364,352 unique words

06/04/2017 02:11 AM 134,706,719 Webster's_Unabridged_3_(En-En)_WHOLEWORDS_ANSI.dsl
06/04/2017 02:11 AM 3,789,032 Webster's_Unabridged_3_(En-En)_WHOLEWORDS_ANSI.dsl_(364352_words).wrd

As for GoogleBooks corpus:

Quote:
"This dataset is based on the English Google Books corpus. This is the same corpus used to derive the Google Books Ngrams, and is described in detail in Michel et.al 2011.
The corpus consists of the text of 3,473,595 English books which were published between 1520 and 2008, with the majority of the content published after 1800."


Source:
http://storage.googleapis.com/books/syntactic-ngrams/index.html

Below, the actual making of the corpus is given.

G:\Latin_HERITAGE_SOED_EnWIKT_MASAKARI_(Urban_OED_MW_Enwiki_Google)\v2>MERGE.BAT

G:\Latin_HERITAGE_SOED_EnWIKT_MASAKARI_(Urban_OED_MW_Enwiki_Google)\v2>dir/og/on

06/04/2017 02:11 AM 60,182,193,037 enwiki-20170101-pages-articles.xml
06/04/2017 02:11 AM 392,023,425 enwiki-20170101-pages-articles.xml_(37112070_words).wrd
06/04/2017 02:11 AM 81,324,663 Google_Books_corpus_All_Nodes_ripped_7477257_1gramlist_out_of_3473595_English_books.txt
06/04/2017 02:11 AM 217,088 Kazahana_r1-++fix+nowait_critical_nixFIX_WolfRAM+fixITER+EX+CS_fix_DEFINE_HEXADECAD-Threads_IntelV12_SSE2_64bit.exe
06/04/2017 02:11 AM 195,072 Kazahana_r1-++fix+nowait_critical_nixFIX_WolfRAM+fixITER+EX+CS_fix_DEFINE_MONAD-Thread_IntelV12_SSE2_64bit.exe
06/04/2017 02:11 AM 133,632 Leprechaun_x-leton_32bit_Intel_01_512p.exe
06/04/2017 02:11 AM 147,456 Leprechaun_x-leton_64bit_Intel_01_001p.exe
06/04/2017 02:11 AM 1,114,552 libiomp5md.dll
06/04/2017 02:11 AM 411 MERGE.BAT
06/04/2017 02:11 AM 1,632 MokujIN GREEN 224 prompt.lnk
06/04/2017 02:11 AM 564,235,251 Oxford_English_Dictionary_2nd_Edition_Version_4_(En-En)_WHOLEWORDS.dsl
06/04/2017 02:11 AM 11,252,560 Oxford_English_Dictionary_2nd_Edition_Version_4_(En-En)_WHOLEWORDS.dsl_(1089240_words).wrd
06/04/2017 02:11 AM 900,933,776 Urban_Dictionary_2015_(Eng-Eng)_utf8.txt
06/04/2017 02:11 AM 15,093,413 Urban_Dictionary_2015_(Eng-Eng)_utf8.txt_(1454941_words).wrd
06/04/2017 02:11 AM 134,706,719 Webster's_Unabridged_3_(En-En)_WHOLEWORDS_ANSI.dsl
06/04/2017 02:11 AM 3,789,032 Webster's_Unabridged_3_(En-En)_WHOLEWORDS_ANSI.dsl_(364352_words).wrd

G:\Latin_HERITAGE_SOED_EnWIKT_MASAKARI_(Urban_OED_MW_Enwiki_Google)\v2>dir enwiki*.wrd Google*.txt urb*.wrd oxfo*.wrd web*.wrd/b
enwiki-20170101-pages-articles.xml_(37112070_words).wrd
Google_Books_corpus_All_Nodes_ripped_7477257_1gramlist_out_of_3473595_English_books.txt
Urban_Dictionary_2015_(Eng-Eng)_utf8.txt_(1454941_words).wrd
Oxford_English_Dictionary_2nd_Edition_Version_4_(En-En)_WHOLEWORDS.dsl_(1089240_words).wrd
Webster's_Unabridged_3_(En-En)_WHOLEWORDS_ANSI.dsl_(364352_words).wrd

G:\Latin_HERITAGE_SOED_EnWIKT_MASAKARI_(Urban_OED_MW_Enwiki_Google)\v2>dir enwiki*.wrd Google*.txt urb*.wrd oxfo*.wrd web*.wrd/b 1>enwiki_google_urban_oxford_webster.lst

G:\Latin_HERITAGE_SOED_EnWIKT_MASAKARI_(Urban_OED_MW_Enwiki_Google)\v2>Leprechaun_x-leton_64bit_Intel_01_001p.exe enwiki_google_urban_oxford_webster.lst enwiki_google_urban_oxford_webster.wrd 4200123 Y
Leprechaun_singleton (Fast-In-Future Greedy n-gram-Ripper), rev. 16FIXFIXfixfix, written by Svalqyatchx.
Purpose: Rips all distinct 1-grams (1-word phrases) with length 1..31 chars from incoming texts.
Feature1: All words within x-lets/n-grams are in range 1..31 chars inclusive.
Feature2: In this revision 512MB 1-way hash is used which results in 67,108,864 external B-Trees of order 3.
Feature3: In this revision, 1 pass is to be made.
Feature4: If the external memory has latency 99+microseconds then !(look no further), IOPS(seek-time) rules.
Pass #1 of 1:
Size of input file with files for Leprechauning: 371
Allocating HASH memory 536,870,977 bytes ... OK
Allocating memory 4102MB ... OK
Size of Input TEXTual file: 392,023,425
-; 02,854,774P/s; Phrase count: 37,112,070 of them 37,112,070 distinct; Done: 64/64
Size of Input TEXTual file: 81,324,663
|; 02,972,621P/s; Phrase count: 44,589,327 of them 41,155,309 distinct; Done: 64/64
Size of Input TEXTual file: 15,093,413
-; 02,877,766P/s; Phrase count: 46,044,268 of them 41,893,690 distinct; Done: 64/64
Size of Input TEXTual file: 11,252,560
\; 02,945,844P/s; Phrase count: 47,133,508 of them 42,259,459 distinct; Done: 64/64
Size of Input TEXTual file: 3,789,032
-; 02,968,616P/s; Phrase count: 47,497,860 of them 42,288,560 distinct; Done: 64/64
Bytes per second performance: 31,467,693B/s
Phrases per second performance: 2,968,616P/s
Time for putting phrases into trees: 16 second(s)
Flushing UNsorted phrases: 100%; Shaking trees performance: 01,838,633P/s
Time for shaking phrases from trees: 46 second(s)
Leprechaun: Current pass done.

Total memory needed for one pass: 3,272,632KB
Total distinct phrases: 42,288,560
Total time: 63 second(s)
Total performance: 753,934P/s i.e. phrases per second
Leprechaun: Done.

G:\Latin_HERITAGE_SOED_EnWIKT_MASAKARI_(Urban_OED_MW_Enwiki_Google)\v2>sort /+10 enwiki_google_urban_oxford_webster.wrd /O enwiki_google_urban_oxford_webster_(unique-1-grams).wrd

G:\Latin_HERITAGE_SOED_EnWIKT_MASAKARI_(Urban_OED_MW_Enwiki_Google)\v2>dir/og/on

06/04/2017 12:11 PM 371 enwiki_google_urban_oxford_webster.lst
06/04/2017 12:12 PM 874,575,018 enwiki_google_urban_oxford_webster.wrd
06/04/2017 12:16 PM 874,575,018 enwiki_google_urban_oxford_webster_(unique-1-grams).wrd
06/04/2017 02:11 AM 60,182,193,037 enwiki-20170101-pages-articles.xml
06/04/2017 02:11 AM 392,023,425 enwiki-20170101-pages-articles.xml_(37112070_words).wrd
06/04/2017 02:11 AM 81,324,663 Google_Books_corpus_All_Nodes_ripped_7477257_1gramlist_out_of_3473595_English_books.txt
06/04/2017 02:11 AM 217,088 Kazahana_r1-++fix+nowait_critical_nixFIX_WolfRAM+fixITER+EX+CS_fix_DEFINE_HEXADECAD-Threads_IntelV12_SSE2_64bit.exe
06/04/2017 02:11 AM 195,072 Kazahana_r1-++fix+nowait_critical_nixFIX_WolfRAM+fixITER+EX+CS_fix_DEFINE_MONAD-Thread_IntelV12_SSE2_64bit.exe
06/04/2017 02:11 AM 133,632 Leprechaun_x-leton_32bit_Intel_01_512p.exe
06/04/2017 02:11 AM 147,456 Leprechaun_x-leton_64bit_Intel_01_001p.exe
06/04/2017 02:11 AM 1,114,552 libiomp5md.dll
06/04/2017 02:11 AM 411 MERGE.BAT
06/04/2017 02:11 AM 1,632 MokujIN GREEN 224 prompt.lnk
06/04/2017 02:11 AM 564,235,251 Oxford_English_Dictionary_2nd_Edition_Version_4_(En-En)_WHOLEWORDS.dsl
06/04/2017 02:11 AM 11,252,560 Oxford_English_Dictionary_2nd_Edition_Version_4_(En-En)_WHOLEWORDS.dsl_(1089240_words).wrd
06/04/2017 02:11 AM 900,933,776 Urban_Dictionary_2015_(Eng-Eng)_utf8.txt
06/04/2017 02:11 AM 15,093,413 Urban_Dictionary_2015_(Eng-Eng)_utf8.txt_(1454941_words).wrd
06/04/2017 02:11 AM 134,706,719 Webster's_Unabridged_3_(En-En)_WHOLEWORDS_ANSI.dsl
06/04/2017 02:11 AM 3,789,032 Webster's_Unabridged_3_(En-En)_WHOLEWORDS_ANSI.dsl_(364352_words).wrd

G:\Latin_HERITAGE_SOED_EnWIKT_MASAKARI_(Urban_OED_MW_Enwiki_Google)\v2>type "enwiki_google_urban_oxford_webster_(unique-1-grams).wrd"
0,000,005 a
0,000,005 aa
0,000,005 aaa
0,000,004 aaaa
0,000,003 aaaaa
0,000,003 aaaaaa
0,000,003 aaaaaaa
0,000,003 aaaaaaaa
0,000,003 aaaaaaaaa
0,000,003 aaaaaaaaaa
0,000,003 aaaaaaaaaaa
0,000,003 aaaaaaaaaaaa
0,000,003 aaaaaaaaaaaaa
0,000,003 aaaaaaaaaaaaaa
0,000,003 aaaaaaaaaaaaaaa
0,000,003 aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa
0,000,003 aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa
0,000,003 aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa
0,000,003 aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa
0,000,003 aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa
0,000,002 aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa
0,000,003 aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa
0,000,003 aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa
0,000,002 aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa
0,000,002 aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa
0,000,003 aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa
0,000,003 aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa
0,000,003 aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa
0,000,003 aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa
0,000,003 aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa
0,000,003 aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa
0,000,001 aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaad
0,000,001 aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaah
...

G:\Latin_HERITAGE_SOED_EnWIKT_MASAKARI_(Urban_OED_MW_Enwiki_Google)\v2>"Kazahana_r1-++fix+nowait_critical_nixFIX_WolfRAM+fixITER+EX+CS_fix_DEFINE_HEXADECAD-Threads_IntelV12_SSE2_64bit.exe" 3e "quizzacious" enwiki_google_urban_oxford_webster.wrd 1536
Kazahana, a superfast exact & wildcards & Levenshtein Distance (Wagner-Fischer) searcher, r. 1-++fix+nowait_critical_nixFIX_Wolfram+fixITER+EX+CS_fix_DEFINE, copyleft Kaze 2014-Dec-04.
Pattern: quizzacious
omp_get_num_procs( ) = 4
omp_get_max_threads( ) = 4
Enforcing HEXADECAD i.e. hexadecuple-threads ...
Allocating Master-Buffer 1536KB ... OK
\; Speed: 00,000,008,956 bytes/clock; Traversed: 874,506,795 bytes
Kazahana: Total/Checked/Dumped xgrams: 42,288,560/2,569,786,480/61
Kazahana: Performance: 8 KB/clock
Kazahana: Performance: 432 xgrams/clock
Kazahana: Performance: Total/fread() clocks: 97,860/342
Kazahana: Performance: I/O time, i.e. fread() time, is 0 percents
Kazahana: Performance: RDTSC I/O time, i.e. fread() time, is 802,246,437 ticks
Kazahana: Done.

G:\Latin_HERITAGE_SOED_EnWIKT_MASAKARI_(Urban_OED_MW_Enwiki_Google)\v2>type Kazahana.txt
0,000,001 locquacious
0,000,001 coquillaceous
0,000,001 ubiquitarious
0,000,001 laquacious
0,000,001 sequaciousnesse
0,000,001 quintatiousgooch
0,000,001 sesquipedalianloquaciousness
0,000,001 squirtatious
0,000,001 marquacious
0,000,002 soliloquacious
0,000,001 squidlicious
0,000,002 quacious
0,000,005 loquaciously
0,000,001 overloquacious
0,000,001 quotacious
0,000,001 equivocacious
0,000,001 unloquacious
0,000,001 izzarious
0,000,001 precedentsequacious
0,000,001 quizzaciously
0,000,001 requiencious
0,000,001 fluidacious
0,000,001 quizzlicious
0,000,001 liquacious
0,000,001 desquicious
0,000,001 bloquacious
0,000,001 ventriloquizations
0,000,001 quintagious
0,000,001 cameretiquacious
0,000,001 tranquilicious
0,000,001 jerarquizacion
0,000,001 squillacius
0,000,005 loquaciousness
0,000,001 loquaciousnika
0,000,001 colloquacious
0,000,001 jaquacious
0,000,001 dequicious
0,000,001 loquaciousfluffy
0,000,001 liquicious
0,000,001 quimbacious
0,000,001 fizznacious
0,000,002 circumloquacious
0,000,002 quizzacious
0,000,001 aquasacious
0,000,001 spequilicious
0,000,001 liquidacious
0,000,001 quilicious
0,000,001 quaciousness
0,000,001 quinarious
0,000,004 sequacious
0,000,001 quintavious
0,000,001 somniloquacious
0,000,001 cquacious
0,000,001 multiloquacious
0,000,001 loquaciousmuse
0,000,001 nonsequacious
0,000,001 fruitacious
0,000,001 eloquacious
0,000,005 loquacious
0,000,002 sequaciously
0,000,004 sequaciousness

G:\Latin_HERITAGE_SOED_EnWIKT_MASAKARI_(Urban_OED_MW_Enwiki_Google)\v2>"Kazahana_r1-++fix+nowait_critical_nixFIX_WolfRAM+fixITER+EX+CS_fix_DEFINE_HEXADECAD-Threads_IntelV12_SSE2_64bit.exe" "*quizzacio*" enwiki_google_urban_oxford_webster.wrd 1536
Kazahana, a superfast exact & wildcards & Levenshtein Distance (Wagner-Fischer) searcher, r. 1-++fix+nowait_critical_nixFIX_Wolfram+fixITER+EX+CS_fix_DEFINE, copyleft Kaze 2014-Dec-04.
Enforcing Case Insensitive wildcard mode ...
Enforcing SLOW wildcard mode ...
Pattern: *quizzacio*
omp_get_num_procs( ) = 4
omp_get_max_threads( ) = 4
Enforcing HEXADECAD i.e. hexadecuple-threads ...
Allocating Master-Buffer 1536KB ... OK
\; Speed: 00,000,120,273 bytes/clock; Traversed: 874,506,795 bytes
Kazahana: Total/Checked/Dumped xgrams: 42,288,560/42,288,560/2
Kazahana: Performance: 117 KB/clock
Kazahana: Performance: 5,804 xgrams/clock
Kazahana: Performance: Total/fread() clocks: 7,286/378
Kazahana: Performance: I/O time, i.e. fread() time, is 5 percents
Kazahana: Performance: RDTSC I/O time, i.e. fread() time, is 792,749,796 ticks
Kazahana: Done.

G:\Latin_HERITAGE_SOED_EnWIKT_MASAKARI_(Urban_OED_MW_Enwiki_Google)\v2>type Kazahana.txt
[*quizzacio*] 0,000,001 quizzaciously /enwiki_google_urban_oxford_webster.wrd/
[*quizzacio*] 0,000,002 quizzacious /enwiki_google_urban_oxford_webster.wrd/

G:\Latin_HERITAGE_SOED_EnWIKT_MASAKARI_(Urban_OED_MW_Enwiki_Google)\v2>"Kazahana_r1-++fix+nowait_critical_nixFIX_WolfRAM+fixITER+EX+CS_fix_DEFINE_HEXADECAD-Threads_IntelV12_SSE2_64bit.exe" "*quizza*" enwiki_google_urban_oxford_webster.wrd 1536
Kazahana, a superfast exact & wildcards & Levenshtein Distance (Wagner-Fischer) searcher, r. 1-++fix+nowait_critical_nixFIX_Wolfram+fixITER+EX+CS_fix_DEFINE, copyleft Kaze 2014-Dec-04.
Enforcing Case Insensitive wildcard mode ...
Enforcing SLOW wildcard mode ...
Pattern: *quizza*
omp_get_num_procs( ) = 4
omp_get_max_threads( ) = 4
Enforcing HEXADECAD i.e. hexadecuple-threads ...
Allocating Master-Buffer 1536KB ... OK
\; Speed: 00,000,123,990 bytes/clock; Traversed: 874,506,795 bytes
Kazahana: Total/Checked/Dumped xgrams: 42,288,560/42,288,560/28
Kazahana: Performance: 120 KB/clock
Kazahana: Performance: 5,983 xgrams/clock
Kazahana: Performance: Total/fread() clocks: 7,068/327
Kazahana: Performance: I/O time, i.e. fread() time, is 4 percents
Kazahana: Performance: RDTSC I/O time, i.e. fread() time, is 793,710,813 ticks
Kazahana: Done.

G:\Latin_HERITAGE_SOED_EnWIKT_MASAKARI_(Urban_OED_MW_Enwiki_Google)\v2>type Kazahana.txt
[*quizza*] 0,000,001 quizzarre /enwiki_google_urban_oxford_webster.wrd/
[*quizza*] 0,000,002 quizzability /enwiki_google_urban_oxford_webster.wrd/
[*quizza*] 0,000,001 squizzarette /enwiki_google_urban_oxford_webster.wrd/
[*quizza*] 0,000,001 bubquizzal /enwiki_google_urban_oxford_webster.wrd/
[*quizza*] 0,000,002 unquizzable /enwiki_google_urban_oxford_webster.wrd/
[*quizza*] 0,000,002 quizzaz /enwiki_google_urban_oxford_webster.wrd/
[*quizza*] 0,000,001 squizzato /enwiki_google_urban_oxford_webster.wrd/
[*quizza*] 0,000,001 squizzado /enwiki_google_urban_oxford_webster.wrd/
[*quizza*] 0,000,001 quizzazz /enwiki_google_urban_oxford_webster.wrd/
[*quizza*] 0,000,001 quizzawiddapizza /enwiki_google_urban_oxford_webster.wrd/
[*quizza*] 0,000,001 quizzar /enwiki_google_urban_oxford_webster.wrd/
[*quizza*] 0,000,001 quizzatorial /enwiki_google_urban_oxford_webster.wrd/
[*quizza*] 0,000,002 quizzable /enwiki_google_urban_oxford_webster.wrd/
[*quizza*] 0,000,001 quizzaciously /enwiki_google_urban_oxford_webster.wrd/
[*quizza*] 0,000,002 quizzards /enwiki_google_urban_oxford_webster.wrd/
[*quizza*] 0,000,001 quizzam /enwiki_google_urban_oxford_webster.wrd/
[*quizza*] 0,000,001 squizzamaroo /enwiki_google_urban_oxford_webster.wrd/
[*quizza*] 0,000,001 quizzaire /enwiki_google_urban_oxford_webster.wrd/
[*quizza*] 0,000,001 squizzay /enwiki_google_urban_oxford_webster.wrd/
[*quizza*] 0,000,002 quizzacious /enwiki_google_urban_oxford_webster.wrd/
[*quizza*] 0,000,001 squizzard /enwiki_google_urban_oxford_webster.wrd/
[*quizza*] 0,000,002 squizza /enwiki_google_urban_oxford_webster.wrd/
[*quizza*] 0,000,001 squizzar /enwiki_google_urban_oxford_webster.wrd/
[*quizza*] 0,000,001 quizzart /enwiki_google_urban_oxford_webster.wrd/
[*quizza*] 0,000,003 quizzard /enwiki_google_urban_oxford_webster.wrd/
[*quizza*] 0,000,001 smoquizza /enwiki_google_urban_oxford_webster.wrd/
[*quizza*] 0,000,001 quizzardry /enwiki_google_urban_oxford_webster.wrd/
[*quizza*] 0,000,001 quizzacle /enwiki_google_urban_oxford_webster.wrd/

G:\Latin_HERITAGE_SOED_EnWIKT_MASAKARI_(Urban_OED_MW_Enwiki_Google)\v2>

If you are not accustomed to use Command Prompt a.k.a. Console, use my GUI (Graphics-User-Interface) tool - Gallowwalker - see above in this thread for more info.

Feel free to ask me anything related to quering/making/using 'Lichfield' corpus...

https://drive.google.com/file/d/0BzKgu_YpO6uZNmF1MzFWaTBRbkU/view?usp=sharing



Grmbl, seeing 'quizzaciosness' in the 'ElderSpeak: A Thesaurus or Compendium of Words Related to Old Age' book makes me feel uneasy - not having this word is unacceptable - the "blame" falls entirely on Google Books Team - they simply have it but included it not since it is published 2014 while the corpus used was derived from books up to 2008 - Version 2013-05-01 is the stamp for the dump not for the books included, so the "blame" is lifted.



He learns not to learn and reverts to what all men pass by.
Sanmayce
Posted: Monday, June 05, 2017 5:42:29 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 5/29/2012
Posts: 193
Neurons: 975
Location: Sofia, Sofia-Capital, Bulgaria
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lich
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lichfield

Having looked up the etymology of the hometown name of Samuel Johnson made me coin a less morbid word - 'schizandrafield'. In fact, it is a vivid word in all senses:

Quote:
Whether it’s in its whole berry form, beverage or powder, schizandra berry supports healthy energy, vitality, cell function, calming relaxation, mental clarity, stamina, immunity, detoxification, reproduction and digestion.

Source:
http://www.prworkzone.com/dr-changs-farm-of-whately-mass-receives-organic-recertification-for-schizandra-berries/

Moreover, its meaning 'Five Tastes' suggests the richness within - the same goes for the corpus.



Despite unseen until today, it is equally acceptable since it shares the "rule" of concatenating two nouns into one, as in the popular game 'Battlefield'. Other instances as 'cornfield' and ... ok let's find all 'field' suffixes occurring in all the 5 wordlists:

H:\Richest_1-gram_corpus_revision-A_(Urban_OED_MW3_Enwiki_GoogleBooks)>"Kazahana_r1-++fix+nowait_critical_nixFIX_WolfRAM+fixITER+EX+CS_fix_DEFINE_HEXADECAD-Threads_IntelV12_SSE2_64bit.exe" *field "enwiki_google_urban_oxford_webster_(4
2,288,560_unique_words).wrd" 1535
Kazahana, a superfast exact & wildcards & Levenshtein Distance (Wagner-Fischer) searcher, r. 1-++fix+nowait_critical_nixFIX_Wolfram+fixITER+EX+CS_fix_DEFINE, copyleft Kaze 2014-Dec-04.
Enforcing Case Insensitive wildcard mode ...
Enforcing SLOW wildcard mode ...
Pattern: *field
omp_get_num_procs( ) = 4
omp_get_max_threads( ) = 4
Enforcing HEXADECAD i.e. hexadecuple-threads ...
Allocating Master-Buffer 1535KB ... OK
\; Speed: 00,000,043,123 bytes/clock; Traversed: 873,937,575 bytes
Kazahana: Total/Checked/Dumped xgrams: 42,288,560/42,288,560/9,745
Kazahana: Performance: 42 KB/clock
Kazahana: Performance: 2,082 xgrams/clock
Kazahana: Performance: Total/fread() clocks: 20,302/7,618
Kazahana: Performance: I/O time, i.e. fread() time, is 37 percents
Kazahana: Performance: RDTSC I/O time, i.e. fread() time, is 21,604,619,043 ticks
Kazahana: Done.

H:\Richest_1-gram_corpus_revision-A_(Urban_OED_MW3_Enwiki_GoogleBooks)>sort /R Kazahana.txt |more
0,000,005 wingfield
0,000,005 whitfield
0,000,005 whitefield
0,000,005 westerfield
0,000,005 wakefield
0,000,005 upfield
0,000,005 summerfield
0,000,005 subfield
0,000,005 stubblefield
0,000,005 stansfield
0,000,005 springfield
0,000,005 sommerfield
0,000,005 snowfield
0,000,005 smithfield
0,000,005 sheffield
0,000,005 rosenfield
0,000,005 redfield
0,000,005 pittsfield
0,000,005 penfield
0,000,005 outfield
0,000,005 minefield
0,000,005 midfield
0,000,005 masefield
0,000,005 mansfield
0,000,005 macclesfield
0,000,005 longfield
0,000,005 littlefield
0,000,005 litchfield
0,000,005 lancefield
0,000,005 kentfield
0,000,005 infield
0,000,005 huddersfield
0,000,005 hayfield
0,000,005 hatfield
0,000,005 hartfield
0,000,005 hadfield
0,000,005 greenfield
0,000,005 goldfield
0,000,005 garfield
0,000,005 fifield
0,000,005 field
0,000,005 fairfield
0,000,005 enfield
0,000,005 duffield
0,000,005 driffield
0,000,005 downfield
0,000,005 deerfield
0,000,005 dangerfield
0,000,005 cornfield
0,000,005 copperfield
0,000,005 chesterfield
0,000,005 centerfield
0,000,005 caulfield
0,000,005 canfield
0,000,005 butterfield
0,000,005 burchfield
0,000,005 brownfield
0,000,005 bromfield
0,000,005 bradfield
0,000,005 boatfield
0,000,005 bloomfield
0,000,005 benfield
0,000,005 benefield
0,000,005 bedingfield
0,000,005 battlefield
0,000,005 barnfield
0,000,005 banfield
0,000,005 backfield
0,000,005 airfield
0,000,005 afield
0,000,004 ziegfield
0,000,004 woodfield
0,000,004 winterfield
0,000,004 winnfield
0,000,004 winfield
0,000,004 wheatfield
0,000,004 wethersfield
0,000,004 westfield
0,000,004 waterfield
0,000,004 warfield
0,000,004 urnfield
0,000,004 topsfield
0,000,004 tofield
^C
H:\Richest_1-gram_corpus_revision-A_(Urban_OED_MW3_Enwiki_GoogleBooks)>

For 2000 years the Chinese medicine uses 'schisandra chinensis' a.k.a. 'schizandra'. Here in Sofia a Chinese herbal shop is selling liquid extracts of Ginseng and Schizandra, so to pay tribute to this superberry the next revision B of the 'Lichfield' corpus will carry the name 'Schizandrafield'.



Download Richest_1-gram_corpus_revision-B_(Urban_OED_MW3_Enwiki_GoogleBooks_Wiktionaries).zip (278,573,296 bytes) at:
https://drive.google.com/file/d/0BzKgu_YpO6uZUjdDYjJkZVYtWjQ/view?usp=sharing

Download Schizandrafield.pdf (578,004 bytes) at:
https://drive.google.com/file/d/0BzKgu_YpO6uZWkxVUzdXVm9hMGs/view?usp=sharing



Omijacha is a traditional Korean tea that is made from dried fruits of Schisandra chinensis. The word 'Omijacha' occurs once in 'Lichfield'.
When ordering/exploring herbs too often I need the local (in above example Korean) term as well as the Latin one, so 'Lichfield' serves well by giving both.

In 'Schizandrafield' corpus my intent is to enrich the present 42,288,560 words with Japanese words:

s - surname (138,500)
p - place-name (99,500)
u - person name, either given or surname, as-yet unclassified (139,000)
g - given name, as-yet not classified by sex (64,600)
f - female given name (106,300)
m - male given name (14,500)
h - full (usually family plus given) name of a particular person (30,500)
pr - product name (55)
c - company name (34)
st - stations (8,254)

Source:
http://www.csse.monash.edu.au/~jwb/enamdict_doc.html

As well as all words from Latin-ish Wiktionaries:

DE Germany
EN English
ES Spain
FI Finland
FR France
IE Ireland
IS Iceland
IT Italy
NO Norway
PT Portugal
RO Romania

Thus, little known native (e.g. Italian) terms will be searchable.

And how it was made:

H:\Richest_1-gram_corpus_revision-B_(Urban_OED_MW3_Enwiki_GoogleBooks_Wiktionary)>dir/og/oe

06/04/2017 02:47 PM 147,456 Leprechaun_x-leton_64bit_Intel_01_001p.exe
06/05/2017 05:49 PM 863,064,152 eswiktionary-20170501-pages-articles.xml
06/05/2017 05:43 PM 1,008,892,714 dewiktionary-20170501-pages-articles.xml
06/05/2017 05:42 PM 3,352,455,315 frwiktionary-20170501-pages-articles.xml
06/05/2017 05:42 PM 2,733,992 iewiktionary-20170501-pages-articles.xml
06/05/2017 05:42 PM 28,217,978 iswiktionary-20170501-pages-articles.xml
06/05/2017 05:42 PM 435,912,328 itwiktionary-20170501-pages-articles.xml
06/05/2017 05:49 PM 393,591,505 fiwiktionary-20170501-pages-articles.xml
06/05/2017 05:48 PM 5,019,399,749 enwiktionary-20170501-pages-articles.xml
06/05/2017 05:42 PM 133,602,036 nowiktionary-20170501-pages-articles.xml
06/05/2017 05:42 PM 312,139,461 ptwiktionary-20170501-pages-articles.xml
06/05/2017 05:43 PM 195,414,605 rowiktionary-20170501-pages-articles.xml

H:\Richest_1-gram_corpus_revision-B_(Urban_OED_MW3_Enwiki_GoogleBooks_Wiktionary)>dir *.xml/b>11.lst

H:\Richest_1-gram_corpus_revision-B_(Urban_OED_MW3_Enwiki_GoogleBooks_Wiktionary)>Leprechaun_x-leton_64bit_Intel_01_001p.exe 11.lst DE_EN_ES_FI_FR_IE_IS_IT_NO_PT_RO_Wiktionaries.wrd 2300123 y
Leprechaun_singleton (Fast-In-Future Greedy n-gram-Ripper), rev. 16FIXFIXfixfix, written by Svalqyatchx.
Purpose: Rips all distinct 1-grams (1-word phrases) with length 1..31 chars from incoming texts.
Feature1: All words within x-lets/n-grams are in range 1..31 chars inclusive.
Feature2: In this revision 512MB 1-way hash is used which results in 67,108,864 external B-Trees of order 3.
Feature3: In this revision, 1 pass is to be made.
Feature4: If the external memory has latency 99+microseconds then !(look no further), IOPS(seek-time) rules.
Pass #1 of 1:
Size of input file with files for Leprechauning: 462
Allocating HASH memory 536,870,977 bytes ... OK
Allocating memory 2247MB ... OK
Size of Input TEXTual file: 1,008,892,714
|; 03,559,518P/s; Phrase count: 106,785,554 of them 2,797,126 distinct; Done: 64/64
Size of Input TEXTual file: 5,019,399,749
/; 03,870,526P/s; Phrase count: 665,730,543 of them 15,827,981 distinct; Done: 64/64
Size of Input TEXTual file: 863,064,152
|; 03,881,731P/s; Phrase count: 764,701,035 of them 17,947,938 distinct; Done: 64/64
Size of Input TEXTual file: 393,591,505
/; 03,860,179P/s; Phrase count: 806,777,515 of them 18,912,574 distinct; Done: 64/64
Size of Input TEXTual file: 3,352,455,315
-; 03,931,022P/s; Phrase count: 1,198,961,906 of them 25,445,123 distinct; Done: 64/64
Size of Input TEXTual file: 2,733,992
/; 03,919,573P/s; Phrase count: 1,199,389,489 of them 25,451,249 distinct; Done: 64/64
Size of Input TEXTual file: 28,217,978
-; 03,930,255P/s; Phrase count: 1,202,658,184 of them 25,502,169 distinct; Done: 64/64
Size of Input TEXTual file: 435,912,328
|; 03,922,002P/s; Phrase count: 1,251,118,832 of them 26,188,048 distinct; Done: 64/64
Size of Input TEXTual file: 133,602,036
\; 03,920,569P/s; Phrase count: 1,266,343,955 of them 26,429,851 distinct; Done: 64/64
Size of Input TEXTual file: 312,139,461
|; 03,921,595P/s; Phrase count: 1,301,969,738 of them 26,914,014 distinct; Done: 64/64
Size of Input TEXTual file: 195,414,605
-; 03,929,523P/s; Phrase count: 1,324,249,356 of them 27,341,524 distinct; Done: 64/64
Bytes per second performance: 34,852,889B/s
Phrases per second performance: 3,929,523P/s
Time for putting phrases into trees: 337 second(s)
Flushing UNsorted phrases: 100%; Shaking trees performance: 02,187,321P/s
Time for shaking phrases from trees: 25 second(s)
Leprechaun: Current pass done.

Total memory needed for one pass: 2,209,206KB
Total distinct phrases: 27,341,524
Total time: 363 second(s)
Total performance: 3,648,069P/s i.e. phrases per second
Leprechaun: Done.

H:\Richest_1-gram_corpus_revision-B_(Urban_OED_MW3_Enwiki_GoogleBooks_Wiktionary)>sort DE_EN_ES_FI_FR_IE_IS_IT_NO_PT_RO_Wiktionaries.wrd /O Wiktionaries_DE_EN_ES_FI_FR_IE_IS_IT_NO_PT_RO_(27341524_words).wrd

H:\Richest_1-gram_corpus_revision-B_(Urban_OED_MW3_Enwiki_GoogleBooks_Wiktionary)>dir *.wrd

06/05/2017 06:23 PM 282,164,291 DE_EN_ES_FI_FR_IE_IS_IT_NO_PT_RO_Wiktionaries.wrd
06/05/2017 06:28 PM 282,164,291 Wiktionaries_DE_EN_ES_FI_FR_IE_IS_IT_NO_PT_RO_(27341524_words).wrd

H:\Richest_1-gram_corpus_revision-B_(Urban_OED_MW3_Enwiki_GoogleBooks_Wiktionary)>

And one example:

K:\Richest_1-gram_corpus_revision-B_(Urban_OED_MW3_Enwiki_GoogleBooks_Wiktionaries)>dir

06/05/2017 11:59 PM <DIR> Support
06/05/2017 11:59 PM 217,088 Kazahana_r1-++fix+nowait_critical_nixFIX_WolfRAM+fixITER+EX+CS_fix_DEFINE_HEXADECAD-Threads_IntelV12_SSE2_64bit.exe
06/05/2017 11:59 PM 195,072 Kazahana_r1-++fix+nowait_critical_nixFIX_WolfRAM+fixITER+EX+CS_fix_DEFINE_MONAD-Thread_IntelV12_SSE2_64bit.exe
06/05/2017 11:59 PM 133,632 Leprechaun_x-leton_32bit_Intel_01_512p.exe
06/05/2017 11:59 PM 147,456 Leprechaun_x-leton_64bit_Intel_01_001p.exe
06/05/2017 11:59 PM 1,114,552 libiomp5md.dll
06/05/2017 11:59 PM 77,312 LineWordreporter.exe
06/05/2017 11:59 PM 11,474 log.txt
06/05/2017 11:59 PM 475 MERGE.BAT
06/05/2017 11:59 PM 1,632 MokujIN GREEN 224 prompt.lnk
06/05/2017 11:59 PM 1,343,341,031 Urban_OED_MW3_Enwiki_GoogleBooks_Wiktionaries_JapaneseNames.wrd_(64869182_unique-1-grams).wrd
06/05/2017 11:59 PM 35,015 Yoshi.exe

K:\Richest_1-gram_corpus_revision-B_(Urban_OED_MW3_Enwiki_GoogleBooks_Wiktionaries)>"Kazahana_r1-++fix+nowait_critical_nixFIX_WolfRAM+fixITER+EX+CS_fix_DEFINE_HEXADECAD-Threads_IntelV12_SSE2_64bit.exe" nakamichi "Urban_OED_MW3_Enwiki_GoogleBooks_Wiktionaries_JapaneseNames.wrd_(64869182_unique-1-grams).wrd" 1536
Kazahana, a superfast exact & wildcards & Levenshtein Distance (Wagner-Fischer) searcher, r. 1-++fix+nowait_critical_nixFIX_Wolfram+fixITER+EX+CS_fix_DEFINE, copyleft Kaze 2014-Dec-04.
Pattern: nakamichi
omp_get_num_procs( ) = 4
omp_get_max_threads( ) = 4
Enforcing HEXADECAD i.e. hexadecuple-threads ...
Allocating Master-Buffer 1536KB ... OK
/; Speed: 00,001,331,236 bytes/clock; Traversed: 1,343,217,139 bytes
Kazahana: Dumped xgrams: 38
Kazahana: Performance: 1,295 KB/clock
Kazahana: Performance: Total/fread() clocks: 1,013/733
Kazahana: Performance: I/O time, i.e. fread() time, is 72 percents
Kazahana: Performance: RDTSC I/O time, i.e. fread() time, is 1,917,183,330 ticks
Kazahana: Done.

K:\Richest_1-gram_corpus_revision-B_(Urban_OED_MW3_Enwiki_GoogleBooks_Wiktionaries)>type Kazahana.txt
[nakamichi] 0,000,001 higashinakamichi /Urban_OED_MW3_Enwiki_GoogleBooks_Wiktionaries_JapaneseNames.wrd_(64869182_unique-1-grams).wrd/
[nakamichi] 0,000,001 inakamichi /Urban_OED_MW3_Enwiki_GoogleBooks_Wiktionaries_JapaneseNames.wrd_(64869182_unique-1-grams).wrd/
[nakamichi] 0,000,001 kitakazannakamichi /Urban_OED_MW3_Enwiki_GoogleBooks_Wiktionaries_JapaneseNames.wrd_(64869182_unique-1-grams).wrd/
[nakamichi] 0,000,001 kitakazannakamichichou /Urban_OED_MW3_Enwiki_GoogleBooks_Wiktionaries_JapaneseNames.wrd_(64869182_unique-1-grams).wrd/
[nakamichi] 0,000,001 kitanakamichi /Urban_OED_MW3_Enwiki_GoogleBooks_Wiktionaries_JapaneseNames.wrd_(64869182_unique-1-grams).wrd/
[nakamichi] 0,000,001 kuchinakamichi /Urban_OED_MW3_Enwiki_GoogleBooks_Wiktionaries_JapaneseNames.wrd_(64869182_unique-1-grams).wrd/
[nakamichi] 0,000,001 minaminakamichi /Urban_OED_MW3_Enwiki_GoogleBooks_Wiktionaries_JapaneseNames.wrd_(64869182_unique-1-grams).wrd/
[nakamichi] 0,000,001 nakajimanakamichi /Urban_OED_MW3_Enwiki_GoogleBooks_Wiktionaries_JapaneseNames.wrd_(64869182_unique-1-grams).wrd/
[nakamichi] 0,000,001 nakajimanakamichichou /Urban_OED_MW3_Enwiki_GoogleBooks_Wiktionaries_JapaneseNames.wrd_(64869182_unique-1-grams).wrd/
[nakamichi] 0,000,004 nakamichi /Urban_OED_MW3_Enwiki_GoogleBooks_Wiktionaries_JapaneseNames.wrd_(64869182_unique-1-grams).wrd/
[nakamichi] 0,000,001 nakamichibashi /Urban_OED_MW3_Enwiki_GoogleBooks_Wiktionaries_JapaneseNames.wrd_(64869182_unique-1-grams).wrd/
[nakamichi] 0,000,001 nakamichicr /Urban_OED_MW3_Enwiki_GoogleBooks_Wiktionaries_JapaneseNames.wrd_(64869182_unique-1-grams).wrd/
[nakamichi] 0,000,001 nakamichidai /Urban_OED_MW3_Enwiki_GoogleBooks_Wiktionaries_JapaneseNames.wrd_(64869182_unique-1-grams).wrd/
[nakamichi] 0,000,001 nakamichidan /Urban_OED_MW3_Enwiki_GoogleBooks_Wiktionaries_JapaneseNames.wrd_(64869182_unique-1-grams).wrd/
[nakamichi] 0,000,001 nakamichidani /Urban_OED_MW3_Enwiki_GoogleBooks_Wiktionaries_JapaneseNames.wrd_(64869182_unique-1-grams).wrd/
[nakamichi] 0,000,001 nakamichidoori /Urban_OED_MW3_Enwiki_GoogleBooks_Wiktionaries_JapaneseNames.wrd_(64869182_unique-1-grams).wrd/
[nakamichi] 0,000,001 nakamichidragon /Urban_OED_MW3_Enwiki_GoogleBooks_Wiktionaries_JapaneseNames.wrd_(64869182_unique-1-grams).wrd/
[nakamichi] 0,000,001 nakamichidragonct /Urban_OED_MW3_Enwiki_GoogleBooks_Wiktionaries_JapaneseNames.wrd_(64869182_unique-1-grams).wrd/
[nakamichi] 0,000,001 nakamichieki /Urban_OED_MW3_Enwiki_GoogleBooks_Wiktionaries_JapaneseNames.wrd_(64869182_unique-1-grams).wrd/
[nakamichi] 0,000,001 nakamichigawa /Urban_OED_MW3_Enwiki_GoogleBooks_Wiktionaries_JapaneseNames.wrd_(64869182_unique-1-grams).wrd/
[nakamichi] 0,000,001 nakamichihideki /Urban_OED_MW3_Enwiki_GoogleBooks_Wiktionaries_JapaneseNames.wrd_(64869182_unique-1-grams).wrd/
[nakamichi] 0,000,001 nakamichihigashi /Urban_OED_MW3_Enwiki_GoogleBooks_Wiktionaries_JapaneseNames.wrd_(64869182_unique-1-grams).wrd/
[nakamichi] 0,000,001 nakamichijuumonji /Urban_OED_MW3_Enwiki_GoogleBooks_Wiktionaries_JapaneseNames.wrd_(64869182_unique-1-grams).wrd/
[nakamichi] 0,000,001 nakamichikita /Urban_OED_MW3_Enwiki_GoogleBooks_Wiktionaries_JapaneseNames.wrd_(64869182_unique-1-grams).wrd/
[nakamichi] 0,000,001 nakamichimachi /Urban_OED_MW3_Enwiki_GoogleBooks_Wiktionaries_JapaneseNames.wrd_(64869182_unique-1-grams).wrd/
[nakamichi] 0,000,001 nakamichimae /Urban_OED_MW3_Enwiki_GoogleBooks_Wiktionaries_JapaneseNames.wrd_(64869182_unique-1-grams).wrd/
[nakamichi] 0,000,001 nakamichinishi /Urban_OED_MW3_Enwiki_GoogleBooks_Wiktionaries_JapaneseNames.wrd_(64869182_unique-1-grams).wrd/
[nakamichi] 0,000,001 nakamichisawa /Urban_OED_MW3_Enwiki_GoogleBooks_Wiktionaries_JapaneseNames.wrd_(64869182_unique-1-grams).wrd/
[nakamichi] 0,000,001 nakamichishinden /Urban_OED_MW3_Enwiki_GoogleBooks_Wiktionaries_JapaneseNames.wrd_(64869182_unique-1-grams).wrd/
[nakamichi] 0,000,001 nakamichishita /Urban_OED_MW3_Enwiki_GoogleBooks_Wiktionaries_JapaneseNames.wrd_(64869182_unique-1-grams).wrd/
[nakamichi] 0,000,001 nakamichiue /Urban_OED_MW3_Enwiki_GoogleBooks_Wiktionaries_JapaneseNames.wrd_(64869182_unique-1-grams).wrd/
[nakamichi] 0,000,001 nakamichizawa /Urban_OED_MW3_Enwiki_GoogleBooks_Wiktionaries_JapaneseNames.wrd_(64869182_unique-1-grams).wrd/
[nakamichi] 0,000,001 narutakinakamichi /Urban_OED_MW3_Enwiki_GoogleBooks_Wiktionaries_JapaneseNames.wrd_(64869182_unique-1-grams).wrd/
[nakamichi] 0,000,001 narutakinakamichichou /Urban_OED_MW3_Enwiki_GoogleBooks_Wiktionaries_JapaneseNames.wrd_(64869182_unique-1-grams).wrd/
[nakamichi] 0,000,001 tanakamichishita /Urban_OED_MW3_Enwiki_GoogleBooks_Wiktionaries_JapaneseNames.wrd_(64869182_unique-1-grams).wrd/
[nakamichi] 0,000,001 tanakamichiue /Urban_OED_MW3_Enwiki_GoogleBooks_Wiktionaries_JapaneseNames.wrd_(64869182_unique-1-grams).wrd/
[nakamichi] 0,000,002 uminonakamichi /Urban_OED_MW3_Enwiki_GoogleBooks_Wiktionaries_JapaneseNames.wrd_(64869182_unique-1-grams).wrd/
[nakamichi] 0,000,001 uminonakamichisen /Urban_OED_MW3_Enwiki_GoogleBooks_Wiktionaries_JapaneseNames.wrd_(64869182_unique-1-grams).wrd/

K:\Richest_1-gram_corpus_revision-B_(Urban_OED_MW3_Enwiki_GoogleBooks_Wiktionaries)>


Seeing 'nakamichi' appearing 4 times suggests that the word is well established, which indeed is so.

And finally, for those who are interested in making their own mixes, the 'Support' folder contains all the C sources of tools used.

He learns not to learn and reverts to what all men pass by.
Sorin F. Ghinescu
Posted: Friday, June 16, 2017 1:15:17 PM

Rank: Newbie

Joined: 3/9/2016
Posts: 26
Neurons: 20,916
Location: Bucharest, Bucuresti, Romania
So , where can we grab this amazing list?
leonAzul
Posted: Friday, June 16, 2017 4:13:04 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 8/11/2011
Posts: 7,965
Neurons: 25,156
Location: Miami, Florida, United States
Sorin F. Ghinescu wrote:
So , where can we grab this amazing list?


If you go back to the very first post in this topic you shall find:

Quote:
Free download, here


You might notice from the date, that was almost five years ago.

You might also notice from the rest of the thread that Sanmayce's major participation involves sharing the results of his latest language analysis software. Throughout this thread you will find links to the most up-to-date versions of the software and the corpora (the bodies of printed language which are examined). You can also find them here. These are all freely available. Use these to generate the most up-to-date list.

"Make it go away, Mrs Whatsit," he whispered. "Make it go away. It's evil."
Sorin F. Ghinescu
Posted: Saturday, June 17, 2017 5:10:24 AM

Rank: Newbie

Joined: 3/9/2016
Posts: 26
Neurons: 20,916
Location: Bucharest, Bucuresti, Romania
Thank you Leon
Sanmayce
Posted: Saturday, June 17, 2017 6:30:48 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 5/29/2012
Posts: 193
Neurons: 975
Location: Sofia, Sofia-Capital, Bulgaria
Hi Leon and Sorin,
glad that you find this thread somewhat useful.

Sadly, my intent to enrich the "base" Masakari's 300,000 words up to 750,000 has been hibernated, still alive, though.

To be specific, my wish to present the first [FREE] phrase-checker of orders 1/2/3/4 is to be postponed even more. Simply the computational power needed for making-n-using the checker will advent in next 5 years, almost certain of that I am.
My fidelity to keep things simple forms my faith in realizing the first-free phrase suggester/checker. Currently I did amass some 120GB of ASCII English texts - more than 500,000 ebooks - they need to be ripped down to x-grams and put into pagoda trees, once done this will be the basis, from then on actual benefits will be put to the test.
The good news come in form of drastically reduced access times known as latency, this new memory bridges the gap between the fast-but-insufficient operational RAM and not-so-fast-but-sufficientish virtual RAM:



What is the word for kinda sufficient?
Recently, watched an episode from Supernatural series where the king of hell coined jokingly the word 'loyalish' meaning 'kind of loyal' - the scene was set as demons between him and the former king of hell listening to his expose - he stressed it as this in order to show how little he thought so.

Always good to check the "official" add-ons:
http://public.oed.com/the-oed-today/recent-updates-to-the-oed/september-2016-update/new-words-list-september-2016/

As soon as I opened the link one word caught my attention:
biatch, n.

Immediately I did recall the feeling when hearing 'Prince Igor' song sung by Sissel - not knowing it my first association was being a [informal] form of 'bitch', it turned out to be so.
Funny how some things are imprinted heavily, the reason was that prior to listening to the song I watched an interview with Sissel in which she did strike me with her positive attitude and light (and passionate at the same time) way of explaining her transition from classical singing to "pop" one. She was asked to sing acapella - the aftermath was feeling grace, I daresay.
I reckon, 20 years passed, yet the imprint stays. This very interview and the followed videoclip made me rethink the importance of "opening" a theme, that is, feeding the listener/learner with an horderve, thus having the attention locked on the matter. Concentration reinforced by the initial emotional phase led to my high soakability - to be open for imprinting.
My point, learning/exploring words/phrases/lyrics reaches its climax when one feels the matter.

Source:
https://genius.com/Warren-g-prince-igor-lyrics

One new word I enliked at once:
filthifying

My obsession with verbing, or as I prefer verbifying, ceases not.

Surprisingly, next words had not been included up to Sep 2016:

cheffy
costumey

The first, my guess, is kinda counterpart of 'bossy'.
I noticed a steady trend on sitcoms and for example sci-fi series as 'Stargate Altlantis' where noun+'y' is used quite a lot to form adjectives in a outlaw manner, one such example was when the main scientist coined 'sciencey' to describe that some aliens did not look being science advanced to him.

A good one is 'shopland', some years ago I used 'trollland' in spirit of 'troldom'.

Misterduncan presented some new words to the 2016 OED, 'chefdom' was one of them:
https://youtu.be/FvARDsCQHMI?t=136

Also, a good new word is 'vape[r]' analogous to the 'smoke[r]' here:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=siLl2VOajRQ&t=3s

In the 'Prince Igor' lyrics, at the end, one intersting to me question arises:
How "But I'm down for mine biatch" differs, if at all, from "down with"?
Looking up the pagoda 'down' of order 2 the stats are:

0,075,309 down_with
0,031,979 down_for

D:\z2>dir Kazahana_down.2-1.txt

06/18/2017 12:14 AM 236,733 Kazahana_down.2-1.txt

D:\z2>type Kazahana_down.2-1.txt
0,587,451 down_the
0,415,980 down_to
0,179,724 down_on
0,179,155 down_and
0,160,989 down_in
0,127,250 down_at
0,095,565 down_from
0,087,967 down_into
0,079,700 down_a
0,075,309 down_with
0,067,682 down_his
0,067,132 down_by
0,061,607 down_upon
0,047,614 down_there
0,038,573 down_here
0,036,193 down_again
0,033,754 down_her
0,031,979 down_for
0,030,346 down_as
0,028,827 down_list
0,020,524 down_their
0,019,010 down_before
0,018,781 down_my
0,018,547 down_through
0,016,825 down_beside
0,016,491 down_that
0,015,558 down_over
0,013,022 down_menu
0,012,356 down_all
0,012,329 down_your
0,011,867 down_stairs
0,011,439 down_below
0,011,214 down_like
0,011,132 down_of
0,010,941 down_this
0,010,418 down_or
0,010,141 down_one
0,009,566 down_under
...

It is challenging to know if they are interchangeable or there is some subtle difference, this is one of the questions the phrase-checker cannot answer.

Sorin, maybe you will find more useful having next three wordlists than querying Schizandrafield corpus:

Webster's_Unabridged_3_(En-En)_WHOLEWORDS_ANSI.dsl_(364352_words).wrd.txt:
https://drive.google.com/file/d/0BzKgu_YpO6uZaHRXdUt3RzBpUXc/view?usp=sharing

Urban_Dictionary_2015_(Eng-Eng)_utf8.txt_(1454941_words).wrd.txt:
https://drive.google.com/file/d/0BzKgu_YpO6uZc2xKVmJHTGJSNEE/view?usp=sharing

Oxford_English_Dictionary_2nd_Edition_Version_4_(En-En)_WHOLEWORDS.dsl_(1089240_words).wrd.txt:
https://drive.google.com/file/d/0BzKgu_YpO6uZVWJyN1I4WUlORjA/view?usp=sharing

I used to ... use OED and SOED software a lot, those two are really superb. Once a lexicographer from Oxford was asked how many words are in the OED and the answer was something like 750,000, looking at the rip above you can see 1,089,240 words, of course there are lots of nonwords so my estimation is 900,000.


He learns not to learn and reverts to what all men pass by.
Sanmayce
Posted: Thursday, June 22, 2017 8:56:10 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 5/29/2012
Posts: 193
Neurons: 975
Location: Sofia, Sofia-Capital, Bulgaria
Just watched Deep Purple - Child In Time - 1970 and spotted a nifty word not included in Schizandrafield:

"Child in Time" is an essentially simple composition, featuring an organ intro, three power chords, and a two-minute-long guitar solo. Lyrically dark, vocalist Ian Gillan utilizes his wide vocal range and goes from quiet singing to loud, high-pitched, banshee-esque screaming.

Source: Wikipedia

It is a shame such a monstrous corpus to lack such a must-have as bansheeesque.

To me, all those nonhyphened (non-hyphened) variants are cooler than hyphened ones.



And looking up the resultant file 'Kazahana.txt' it is missing:



And to form a sentence:

Describing 'Child In Time' in three words - bansheeesquely sung song.

Makes me wonder, how many expressive words as these two are missing!

He learns not to learn and reverts to what all men pass by.
Sanmayce
Posted: Friday, June 23, 2017 4:55:41 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 5/29/2012
Posts: 193
Neurons: 975
Location: Sofia, Sofia-Capital, Bulgaria
Caramba, the two screenshots from the previous post are missing and editing is off?!

Shot1


Shot2



"Bjork, the little elfin Icelander with a voice like a banshee, first got famous as the singer for the Sugarcubes, and has since gone solo to far greater success. She's become known for innovation and her fearless approach to music, mixing styles and genres together and putting her own unmistakable stamp-- that Bansheeesque voice-- on the final product."

Source: http://www.ign.com/articles/2000/01/28/bjork-all-is-full-of-love

Also, a random thought:
Today I heard in hi-fi Dream Theater - Pull Me Under and was ... immersed. Made me wonder what does "Pull Me Under" mean?!

Looking up the idiom "pull under":

pull someone or something under
1. Lit. to drag someone or something beneath the surface of something. The strong undertow pulled John under the surface. The whirlpool nearly pulled the boat under.
2. Fig. to cause someone or something to fail. The heavy debt load pulled Don under. He went out of business. The recession pulled his candy shop under.

Taking into account the TFD encyclopedia pull+me+under:

And the lyrics:

Lost in the sky
Clouds roll by and I roll with them
Arrows fly
Seas increase and then fall again

This world is spinning around me
This world is spinning without me and
Every day sends future to past
Every breath leaves me one less to my last

Watch the sparrow falling
Gives new meaning to it all
If not today nor yet tomorrow then some other day

I'll take seven lives for one
And then my only father's son
As sure as I did ever love him I am not afraid

This world is spinning around me
The whole world keeps spinning around me and
All life is future to past
Every breath leaves me one less to my last

Pull me under
Pull me under
Pull me under I'm not afraid
All that I feel is honor and spite
All I can do is to set it right

Dust fills my eyes
Clouds roll by and I roll with them
Centuries cry
Orders fly and I fall again

This world is spinning inside me
The whole world is spinning inside me
Every day sends future to past
Every step brings me closer to my last

Pull me under
Pull me under
Pull me under I'm not afraid
Living my life too much in the sun
Only until your will is done

Pull me under
Pull me under
Pull me under I'm not afraid
All that I feel is honor and spite
All I can do is to set it right
Pull me under
Pull me under
Pull me under I'm not afraid
Living my life too much in the sun
Only until your will is done

Oh that this too
Too solid flesh
Would melt


I assume the second (the figurative one) is not figurative enough, my understanding is that this superb song added another twist and created a new definition, namely, "to be immersed in a dramatic way".

Thus, combining Moore's and Hamlet's lyrics:

"Lyricist Kevin Moore refers to Shakespeare's Hamlet, as told from Prince Hamlet's point of view.[2] The lyrics allude heavily to the play, echoing Hamlet's desire to give in to his urge to gain revenge for his father at the cost of his own sanity. Over the final moment of the song, James LaBrie can be heard singing the song's only direct quote from the play: "O, that this too, too solid flesh would melt". Therein, Prince Hamlet is pleading for escape from his mortal trappings."

O, that this too, too solid flesh would melt,
Thaw, and resolve itself into a dew!
Or that the Everlasting had not fix'd
His canon 'gainst self-slaughter! O God! God!
How weary, stale, flat, and unprofitable
Seem to me all the uses of this world!

—Prince Hamlet in Hamlet, Act I Scene II

Dream Theater and Shakespeare form a strong duo inhere, the core of my assumption is "resolve itself into a dew" which to me is equal to full immersion into the world i.e. accepting/living the world as it is.

He learns not to learn and reverts to what all men pass by.
shahidmost
Posted: Friday, June 23, 2017 5:45:39 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 7/1/2013
Posts: 517
Neurons: 57,003
Location: London, England, United Kingdom

Well done, this far!

Quite inspiring work, that needs to be kept up.

Sometime ago, I asked a question here in this very forum: what is the word for a lover of words?

I received no answer

May be you can help me with that old enquiry of mine.
leonAzul
Posted: Friday, June 23, 2017 10:23:59 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 8/11/2011
Posts: 7,965
Neurons: 25,156
Location: Miami, Florida, United States
shahidmost wrote:

Well done, this far!

Quite inspiring work, that needs to be kept up.

Sometime ago, I asked a question here in this very forum: what is the word for a lover of words?

I received no answer

May be you can help me with that old enquiry of mine.


That would be logophile.

"Make it go away, Mrs Whatsit," he whispered. "Make it go away. It's evil."
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