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Poetry has been to me its own exceeding great reward; it has given me the habit of wishing to discover the good and beautiful... Options
Daemon
Posted: Saturday, September 29, 2012 12:00:00 AM
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Poetry has been to me its own exceeding great reward; it has given me the habit of wishing to discover the good and beautiful in all that meets and surrounds me.

Samuel Taylor Coleridge (1772-1834)
Thommy
Posted: Saturday, September 29, 2012 4:19:57 AM

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At first I thought this man must have led a very happy life.
However,after I read his biography the opposite seems to
be the case.Perhaps he wasn't able to accept that the world
isn't as good as he always wanted to see it and broke on it.
MTC
Posted: Saturday, September 29, 2012 8:31:06 AM
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It is the editorial policy of TFD to quote authors out of context. (They are not alone.) As a result authors' meanings are frequently misunderstood. Coleridge is only the latest victim of this policy. Anyone reading the quotation in isolation might get the mistaken impression Coleridge wore a pair of rose colored glasses, looking only for "the good and the beautiful" in life. The quotation in full context reveals Coleridge had no such colored and restricted view of life or poetry. See Poems, p. xix, available here: http://books.google.com/books/about/Poems.html?id=oHQCAAAAQAAJ. In the introduction to Poems Coleridge observes "(t)he Communicativeness of our Nature leads us to describe our own sorrows." Quoting another poet: "But O! How grateful to a wounded heart/ The tale of Misery to impart--" Coleridge states the "intellectual activity" of writing about misery provides him with "pleasure" and cathartic release. From context we the readers get a more complete picture of Coleridge's views from that implied by an isolated quotation. Just as with other quotations posted by TFD, I respectfully recommend anyone interested read the quotation in context before reaching any conclusions.
Thommy
Posted: Saturday, September 29, 2012 9:15:09 AM

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MTC wrote:
It is the editorial policy of TFD to quote authors out of context. As a result authors' meanings are frequently misunderstood. Coleridge is only the latest victim of this policy. Anyone reading the quotation in isolation might get the mistaken impression Coleridge wore a pair of rose colored glasses, looking only for "the good and the beautiful" in life. The quotation in full context reveals Coleridge had no such colored and restricted view of life or poetry. See Poems, p. xix, available here: http://books.google.com/books/about/Poems.html?id=oHQCAAAAQAAJ. In the introduction to Poems Coleridge observes "(t)he Communicativeness of our Nature leads us to describe our own sorrows." Quoting another poet: "But O! How grateful to a wounded heart/ The tale of Misery to impart--" Coleridge states the "intellectual activity" of writing about misery provides him with "pleasure" and cathartic release. From context we the readers get a more complete picture of Coleridge's views from that implied by an isolated quotation. Just as with other quotations posted by TFD, I respectfully recommend anyone interested read the quotation in context before reaching any conclusions.


Sorry MTC but your link leads into nothing!!!

Thommy
Posted: Saturday, September 29, 2012 9:30:13 AM

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Joined: 1/24/2010
Posts: 156
Neurons: 464
Perhaps I'm wrong but I guess the aim of "QOTD" isn't to get understanding for the author by looking for context but to collect different views on a quote from different people from different backgrounds from all over the world.
shelf
Posted: Saturday, September 29, 2012 10:19:29 AM

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And perhaps to put our owm meaning to the quote - what does it mean to me? That sort of thing. That's how I use it anyway.
MTC
Posted: Saturday, September 29, 2012 10:29:23 AM
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First, about the link, I double checked, and it is correct, an ebook entitled "Poems" by Coleridge which you can find if you Google the quotation. Why the link draws a blank I do not know.

Second, it may well be the purpose of TFD is to collect different views of a quotation (not quote) of an author, but what if that quotation taken in isolation misrepresents the true, correct, and complete views of the author on a given subject? Is it necessary to sacrifice an author's character to foster debate? Quoting out of context is a logical fallacy (false attribution) which I imagine you studied as an undergraduate. If not, here's a refresher which includes a section on out-of-context quotations. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fallacy_of_quoting_out_of_context. Your interpretation of the isolated quotation illustrates the risks of the practice. After reading Coleridge's brief biography and the isolated quotation, you reached a deeply personal conclusion about Coleridge: "Perhaps he wasn't able to accept that the world isn't as good as he always wanted to see it and broke on it." If you had read the quotation in context, however, you may have reaced a different conclusion about Coleridge the artist and the man.

Also, I believe reacting to a quotation in a knee-jerk fashion (you at least read the biography) encourages mental sloth and judgementalism. This unfortunate trend is endemic in the Twitter Generation along with the bite-sized (or byte-sized) bits approach to learning.
Marissa La Faye Isolde
Posted: Saturday, September 29, 2012 1:01:13 PM
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I think poetry illuminates the beauty and suffering of life in all its many facets. I think it is form of communications that facilitates our 'seeing'--and awareness of what is often 'unseen'.
MTC
Posted: Saturday, September 29, 2012 1:15:13 PM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 1/18/2011
Posts: 2,780
Neurons: 8,606
Marissa La Faye Isolde wrote:
I think poetry illuminates the beauty and suffering of life in all its many facets. I think it is form of communications that facilitates our 'seeing'--and awareness of what is often 'unseen'.


I agree. Well put.
LostinSC
Posted: Wednesday, October 3, 2012 8:42:05 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/30/2012
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The thougths that follow are not meant to be anything than other a lonley old man's grief in losing his love of 38 years to a horrible death of cancer... It has been almost 5 years and my life is finally moving on. Nights are better now and days are filled with activity. There is a dawn every day. Once there was nothing but darkness.

REMEMBERING LATRELLE


The times of life we remember most,
It seems to me, are the little joys and secret
Dreams that host the best of memories.

Evening brings peace; yet sadness
Within the breast of those alone.
Still, time itself cannot address
those days of joy that we have known.

For us, there never was the Spring
Of love, yet still, Summer sunshine
And Autumn warmth would bring
Her Loving arms and gentle heart close to mine.

I walk now into Winters cold
Dark night growing old without her -
And her guiding light.


Chill winds surround the space that
Once held my heart.



So, t’iz true,t’iz true –
As the gospel songs say:
“..at the end of life’s journey
We’ll meet again
Without life’s sorrow and
Without life’s pain“.


Taste…not the bitterness on your tongue
Of life’s regret for things undone.
Taste…still - if you will, those joys
Of life yet waiting to be won.



EPITAPH
E. StV. M.

Heap not on this mound
Roses that she loved so well:
Why bewilder her with roses,
That she cannot see or smell?

She is happy where she lies
With dust upon her eyes.

OTHER LESSONS
For all, life is short
For most life is good
For many life is unfair
For me life is empty.

Somewhere, maybe in an old country song, there is a refrain that goes through my head something like this:

Of all the rainbows in the mind
Deep greens and blues
Are the colors I choose
To leave behind.

I wish you:

Love in the Morning
Laughter at Noon
Happiness at Sunset
And Peace ‘neath the Moon



I must remind myself, again,
I am beyond three score and ten



I love the way words tumble about the page and fall upon the ear when spoken.

Neither limerick nor rhyme nor song or laughter bestirs the heart as can sweet words placed in a lovely order.


Dearest - - - - - - -

If I may. Somehow I seem to think of you that way.
Although we’ve never met-
Our hands have never touched, and yet
You are the joy I hope to see one day.


She sat in my heart and wrapped herself with my soul.


The older I grow the more I distrust the familiar doctrine that age brings wisdom. H. L. Mencken
Marissa La Faye Isolde
Posted: Thursday, October 4, 2012 7:50:50 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/10/2009
Posts: 1,648
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To LostinSC:

Thank you for the poems and the beautiful sentiments you have expressed.
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