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Daemon
Posted: Tuesday, August 28, 2012 12:00:00 AM
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off-color

(adjective) In violation of good taste even verging on the indecent.

Synonyms: indelicate

Usage: The shareholder's meeting was entirely the wrong forum for his off-color joke.
DavidScott
Posted: Tuesday, August 28, 2012 12:10:10 AM
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What a "colorful" word of the day!
Romany
Posted: Tuesday, August 28, 2012 1:20:07 AM
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But, strangely, no mention of the fact that every bit as common is the meaning alluding to feeling slightly ill.

As society becomes more open there isn't as much use of the word 'off-colour' in the sense given above. Not that it isn't still valid or used. But 'off colour' in the other sense is, I think, hugely useful. It has none of the yuk-factor of the early 'liverish' and sounds less slangy than 'blah' and is certainly a lot more versatile than saying one feels 'slightly ill' - because that isn't exactly what it means.

I think its a great compound.
MTC
Posted: Tuesday, August 28, 2012 6:09:26 AM
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Wikipedia has an interesting article on off-color humor at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Off-color_humor

In America the expression "off-color humor" which is sometimes referred to as "blue humor" still has currency.

In India (anybody home?) off-color humor is referred to as "non-veg" according to Wikipedia apparently because Indian society disapproves of a non-vegetarian diet. Some Indians may find non-veg humor hard to stomach, but others quite appetizing.
excaelis
Posted: Tuesday, August 28, 2012 6:19:07 AM

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Carrot Top should do well, then.

Sanity is not statistical
jeans&sneakers
Posted: Wednesday, September 12, 2012 4:31:51 AM

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I didn't notice this. Or rather, I ignored reading this.
In the Phil, we have a term called "green jokes" (no green humor).
And one is called "green-minded" if the person is into such jokes or has a, uh, "corrupted mind".
I don't know why it's called "green jokes"... and I'm curious why it's "blue jokes"?


At the touch of love, everyone becomes a poet. Plato
jacobusmaximus
Posted: Wednesday, September 12, 2012 6:24:02 AM

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Romany wrote:
But, strangely, no mention of the fact that every bit as common is the meaning alluding to feeling slightly ill.

As society becomes more open there isn't as much use of the word 'off-colour' in the sense given above. Not that it isn't still valid or used. But 'off colour' in the other sense is, I think, hugely useful. It has none of the yuk-factor of the early 'liverish' and sounds less slangy than 'blah' and is certainly a lot more versatile than saying one feels 'slightly ill' - because that isn't exactly what it means.

I think its a great compound.


You are in especially good form today Romany, if I may say so. 'off colour' is so polite (but not affectedly so). The phrase reminds me of an officer type in the Royal Air Force who described me as 'thick set'. In other words, fat.

I remember, therefore I am.
FounDit
Posted: Wednesday, September 12, 2012 10:59:16 PM

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jeans&sneakers wrote:

I didn't notice this. Or rather, I ignored reading this.
In the Phil, we have a term called "green jokes" (no green humor).
And one is called "green-minded" if the person is into such jokes or has a, uh, "corrupted mind".
I don't know why it's called "green jokes"... and I'm curious why it's "blue jokes"?


No one seems to know for a fact how certain jokes came to be called "blue". One theory has to do with "blue" laws" that were in force here in the U.S. up until modern times that forbade certain behaviors on Sunday. Many have been modified or eliminated in the past 50 years or so, but I think some still remain in force. They seem to have a long history. So anything that was seen as restrictive was labled as "blue". Bawdy or ribald jokes would fall into that category, and would have been restricted in some venues.

From TFD:

In 1781, the Reverend Samuel Peters published A General History of Connecticut, in which he used the term blue laws to refer to a set of laws that the Puritans had enacted in the 1600s to control morality. He claimed that the laws were printed on blue paper, hence the terminology. Historians, however, have concluded that this claim was false, as were many of the laws he purported to have discovered. Some have speculated that the use of the word blue came from a connotation that suggested a rigidly moral position, akin to the term bluenose that refers to a prudish, moralistic person.




We should look to the past to learn from it, not destroy our future because of it — FounDit
jeans&sneakers
Posted: Thursday, September 13, 2012 4:55:56 AM

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Thank you, FounDit, for explaining it to me.

I found this joke while looking for the origin of the term "green jokes". But it's not a green/blue joke.


Quote:
An Italian, French and Indian went for a job interview in England.

Before the interview, they were told that they must compose a sentence in
English with three main words: Green, pink, and yellow.

The Italian was first: "I wake up in the morning. I see the yellow
sun. I see the green grass and I think to myself, I hope it will be a pink
day."

The French was next: "I wake up in the morning, I eat a yellow banana,
a green pepper and in the evening I watch the pink panter on TV."

Last was the Indian: "I wake up in the morning, I hear the phone
"green green", I "pink" up the phone and I say "Yellow."


At the touch of love, everyone becomes a poet. Plato
Tovarish
Posted: Thursday, September 13, 2012 4:59:48 AM

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A bit crook
jeans&sneakers
Posted: Thursday, September 13, 2012 5:37:36 AM

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Location: Cavite, Calabarzon, Philippines

Sorry, Tov, I don't quite understand.
Did you mean it was a bad joke? I know it's not very funny. But is it a "bad" joke?
They were asked to compose a sentence using those words.... (?)
If I've been insensitive, I'm sorry! Pray


At the touch of love, everyone becomes a poet. Plato
Tovarish
Posted: Thursday, September 13, 2012 7:15:06 AM

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Location: Booligal, New South Wales, Australia
No, No.

No sensitivity felt.

'A bit crook', means in Aussie, a little ill/sick or a little 'off colour'.
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